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ating breath; And, from the sods of grove and glen, Rose ranks of lion-hearted men To battle to the death. The number belonging to Medford who were killed on that day is not known. A worthy old man told us that lie knew of four who fell: William Polly and Henry Putnam, at Concord; and a man named Smith, and another named Francis, in West Cambridge. The two last mentioned were killed by the flank guard of the British, on the retreat to Boston. William Polly was brought to Medford alive,William Polly was brought to Medford alive, but died of his wounds April 25. The Medford men followed the retreating British from Lexington woods to Charlestown ferry, and shot their last ball during the embarkation. Medford men were with Washington at Monmouth, at Brandywine, at the crossing of the Delaware, and in other places, and fought bravely for the liberties and independence of their country. Mr. Nowell, in his diary, kept at Boston, has the following:-- Aug. 6, 1775: Skirmishing Mistick River. Several soldiers brou
un., Aaron Crowell, Jonathan Tufts, Benjamin Peirce, Thomas Wakefield, Jonathan Teel, Aaron Blanchard, Richard Cole, William Binford, Thomas Bradshaw, Daniel Tufts, Peter Tufts, jun., Ebenezer Tufts, Isaac Cooch, Daniel Conery, Richard Paine, William Polly, Peter Conery, David Hadley, Jacob Bedin, Joseph Clefton, Samuel Hadley, jun., Moses Hadley, John Callender, John Clarke, Andrew Bradshaw, Thomas Savels, Francis Hall, and Benjamin Savils. Here are fifty-nine Medford men in actual service; and the State paid them for their services £ 28. 16s. 5d. Each man received pay for five days service, except William Polly, who was killed in battle. Captain Isaac Hall made a report of his company to the heads of the department, Oct. 6, 1775, then stationed on Prospect Hill. He resigned, before the end of the year, for the purpose of taking command of another company; and Lieutenant Caleb Brooks was chosen captain in his stead, and, as such, made a report, January 3, 1776. The cor
ton, on land inherited from Percival, his great-grandfather.  g.Mary, b. Feb. 22, 1785; m. Eli Servey.  h.Calvin, b. Jan. 23, 1789; is of Sutton. 46 c.-111 b.Joseph Hall, a mason, resided in Richmond, Vt.; and d. there, Nov. 22, 1822. He m., in 1769, Mary Trowbridge, of Newton, b. Nov., 1750; d. Dec. 28, 1824; and had--  111 b.-211 i.Thaddeus, b. Mar. 28, 1770.  j.Sarah, b. Nov. 26, 1771; m. Orin Stevens.  k.Amasa, b. June 4, 1774; d. young.  l.Abner, b. July 25, 1775; d. young.  m.Polly, b. May 15, 1777; m. James Butler.  n.Joseph, b. Sept. 14, 1779; is living.  o.Louis, b. Dec. 7, 1781; d. in infancy.  p.Edmund T., b. June 1, 1783; is living.  q.Ethen, b. Sept. 12, 1785; m. Isaac Hallock.  r.Asher, b. June 25, 1787.  s.Anna, b. Apr. 19, 1789; m. Aaron Curtis.  t.John, b. 1791; d. young.  u.Betsey, b. 1793; d. young.  v.Lucy, b. Sept. 22, 1796; m. Nathan Smith. 46 c.-111 d.John Hall, of Sutton, m., Jan. 28, 1777, Dolly Ward, and had--   Lucy, b. Jan. 1
Giles, 1719; Gill, 1738; Goddard, 1745; Gowen, 1773; Grace, 1779; Greatton, 1718; Green, 1785. Hosmer, 1746; Hunt, 1751. Kendall, 1752; Kettle, or Kettell, 1740. Lathe, Laithe, and Leathe, 1738; Learned, 1793; Le Bosquet, 1781. Mack, 1790; Mallard, 1753; Mansfield, 1759; May, 1759; MacCarthy, 1747; MacClinton, 1750; Mead, 1757; Melendy, 1732; Morrill, 1732. Newell, 1767; Newhall, 1751; Nutting, 1729. Oakes, 1721-75. Page, 1747; Pain, 1767; Parker, 1754; Penhallow, 1767; Polly, 1748; Poole, 1732; Powers, 1797; Pratt, 1791. Rand, 1789; Reed, 1755; Richardson, 1796; Robbins, 1765; Rouse, 1770; Rumril, 1750; Rushby, 1735; Russul, 1733. Sables, 1758; Sargent, 1716; Scolly, 1733; Semer, 1719; Simonds, 1773; Souther, 1747; Sprague, 1763; Stocker, 1763; Storer, 1748. Tebodo, 1757; Teel, 1760; Tidd, 1746; Tilton, 1764; Tompson, 1718; Trowbridge, 1787; Turner, 1729; Tuttle, 1729; Tyzick, 1785. Wait, 1725; Waite, 1785; Wakefield, 1751; Walker, 1779; Ward, 1718;
. Norton, 74. Nowell, 3, 7, 9, 14, 37, 43. Noyes, 36, 97, 121. Nutting, 531. Oakes, 36. Oldham family, 531. Oldham, 89, 100. Oliver, 538, 570. One Hundred Laws, 101. Osgood, 236, 240, 531. Oysters, 387. Palmer, 37. Parker, 51, 52, 531. Patch family, 532. Paterson, 533. Patten family, 533. Pauperism, 441. Peirce family, 533. Pemberton, 36. Pepperrell, 538. Perkins, 534. Perry, 534. Physicians, 302. Pierpont, 262, 312. Polly, 151, 534. Ponds, 5. Population, 451. Post Office, 421. Porter family, 534. Porter, 36, 49, 51, 52, 211, 309. Pounds, 449. Prices Current, 400. Pritchard, 36. Productions, 12. Putnam, 151, 306. Public Buildings, 325. Pynchon, 4. Quincy, 4, 73. Railroads, 57. Raleigh, Sir, Walter, 17. Raymond family, 535. Real Estate, Sales of, 44. Records, Town and Church, 28, 29. Reed, 535. Reeves family, 535. Reeves, 36, 106, 449, 560. Register
the following: 1775, April 21, Mr. Henry Putnam—slain at Menotomy by the enemy, in the retreat from Concord on the 19th inst. He was about 70 years. April 26, William Polly, a young man, of a wound in Concord Battle. Mr. Henry Putnam, according to the Medford records, met his death, April 19, and William Polly died April 25, 1775William Polly died April 25, 1775. These persons having connection here, are named in the Genealogies. It is said that William Polly was shot by the British flank-guard while he was riding on horseback at a distance from the main road in Menotomy. A hand-bill published soon after the battle, with forty coffins and the names of the Americans slain presented upWilliam Polly was shot by the British flank-guard while he was riding on horseback at a distance from the main road in Menotomy. A hand-bill published soon after the battle, with forty coffins and the names of the Americans slain presented upon it, entitled the Bloody Butchery by the British Troops; or the Runaway Fight of the Regulars, contains A Funeral Elegy, to the Immortal Memory of those Worthies who were slain in the Battle of Concord, April 19, 1775, from which we extract the following lines: Let's not forget the Danvers race, So late in battle slain, Their v
o be, and hoped that we with thankful hearts and contented minds should enjoy ourselves together through life. The summer, fall and winter passed away: spring came on pleasant; and the 27th of April, 1771, we had a son [John] born — an addition to our comfort: in ‘73, another son Levi; in ‘75, a daughter Joanna; in ‘77, another son Jonas; in ‘79, another son James; in ‘81, another daughter Rebecca; in ‘83, another son Walter Russell; in ‘85, another daughter Betsey; in ‘88, another daughter Polly: all well, and in time all grew old enough and married; and my wife and myself left alone as at first. I invited one son to come and live with me: time passed on until we had been married fifty-three years. She was taken sick, and, alas, she died. And here, my dear friend, I find a period to my earthly happiness. I have kind children and friends; but my bosom friend sleeps in the grave, and earth cannot heal the wound. I have many things in regard to your grandmother and fam
Lexington, 1 June, 1805. Samuel, Jr., and w. Polly O. C. 3 Aug. 1806. Had Samuel, bap. 3 Aug. 18h, m. John Bathrick, 24 Dec. 1746. Hopkins, Polly, m. Seth Stone, of New Salem, 13 Mar. 1803. J, m. Thomas Brown, of Waltham, 30 June, 1793. Polly, m. Gad Wyeth, 1 Dec. 1793. Betsey, m. NewellPolly Horton, 17 Sept. 1806. Ar- Temas and w. Polly were adm. Pct. ch. 18 Oct. 1807. Had CharlesBenjamin, m. Almira Prentiss, 1 Sept. 1836. Polly, Ruth, of Medford, m. William Swan, 13 Apr. 17802, a. 39. Miss Lucy, d. July, 1799, a. 35. Polly, was admitted Prect. ch. 23 Mar. 1806. Mrs. Eston, m. Joseph Weeks, of Camb., 5 Jan. 1778. Polly, d. 12 Oct. 1790, a. 20 mos. Mary, of Camb., m1781. Both o. c. Pet. ch. 28 Oct. 1781. Had Polly, bap. 9 Dec. 1781, perhaps a sister Mary, of Ce knew nothing of them, excepting that George, Polly, Francis and Henry resided near the Susquehann of Martinsville, Morgan Co., Ind.; Hannah and Polly, unknown; Fanny, of Springfield. Ohio; Willia[9 more...]
ry, 17, 28, 37, 58, 83, 96, 111, 112-15, 137, 138, 140, 169-71, 185, 187, 198, 205, 234,246, 258, 269, 270, 272, 273, 276, 282, 283, 298, 316 Phelps, 187, 283, 321 Philbrick, 283 Phillips, 32, 84, 266, 279, 283, 320, 329 Phips, 2 Phipps, 60 Pierce, see Peirce. Pierpont, 283, 331 Pilkington, 283 Pinkerton, 283 Piper, 94, 96, 167, 168, 283, 327 Pitcairne, 52 Pitts, 239, 281, 283 Plympton, 283 Poland, 160, 171, 283, 285 Pollard, 166, 178, 308, 351 Polly, 72, 96, 221, 283, 284, 305 Pomroy, 257, 284 Pool and Poole, 165, 211, 272, 284 Poor, 273 Porter, 31, 32, 80, 90, 91, 207, 223, 252, 273, 284, 344 Potamea, 58 Potter, 54, 154, 165, 170, 172, 177, 189, 284 Powers, 342 Pradox, 58 Pratt, 164, 188, 194,284 Prentice and Prentiss, 9, 20, 25, 27, 28, 94, 96, 110, 112, 113, 120,121, 131, 132,137, 140, 154, 167, 169, 170,186, 197, 198, 201, 203, 209,213, 232, 239, 243, 246,255, 268, 263, 282-87, 289-91, 295, 303, 310, 31
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3., Medford in the War of the Revolution. (search)
omy, and tradition says two men named Smith and Francis were victims of the fight. The minute-men brought home one of their number mortally wounded. He was William Polly, the son of Widow Hannah Polly. He was only eighteen years old. Henry Putnam earned the title of lieutenant during the Louisburg campaign. On account of hs numerous descendants in Medford. Aaron Tufts and William Bucknam were also veterans, and had been honorably discharged from the army six months before. William Polly, a youth of nineteen, had served three months in New Jersey, in 1779. He was a kinsman of William Polly who was shot at Lexington. The youngest in this levy William Polly who was shot at Lexington. The youngest in this levy was sixteen years old—Josiah Cutter, 2d. There were seven others under twenty-one. While these men were in service, Arnold's treason and the execution of Andre occurred. The Medford men were stationed on guard duty at North river. William Bucknam was promoted and served as sergeant. His name is on the muster-roll dated Tap
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