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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James M. Pomeroy or search for James M. Pomeroy in all documents.

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Lieutenant-Colonel; Buel Palmer, Major; Joseph Howland, Adjutant; Arthur Dewint, Quartermaster; Wm. B. Crandall, Surgeon; John H. Moore, Surgeon's Mate; Henry D. Townsend, Paymaster; Royal B. Stratton, Chaplain. non-commissioned staff.--Fred. C. Tapley, Sergeant-Major; C. F. Moore, Quartermaster-Sergeant; Howard B. Utter, Drum-Major; Chas. C. Fleming, Assistant-Adjutant. Company A--David A. Nevins, Captain; Peter L. Van Ness, First Lieutenant; Chas. L. Jones, Ensign. Company B--Jas. M. Pomeroy, Captain; Watson Hopkins, First Lieutenant; Geo. B. Eastman, Ensign. Company C--Frank Palmer, Captain; Royal Corbin, First Lieutenant; Pliny Moore, Ensign. Company D--Geo. Parker, Captain; Albert M. Barney, First Lieutenant; Robert P. Wilson, Ensign. Company E--John L. Stetson, Captain; Ransom M. Pierce, First Lieutenant; Charles H. Bently, Ensign. Company F--John C. Gilmore, Captain; John A. Vance, First Lieutenant; Jos. Holbrook, Ensign. Company G--N. M. Curtis, Captain; Simon C.
It was utterly subversive of the Constitution and of public liberty to clothe any one with dictatorial powers. He then referred to the speech of Mr. Dixon, of Connecticut, who said, in substance, that if African slavery stood in the way it must be abolished. Mr. Dixon had the secretary read what he did say on the subject, as published. Mr. Breckinridge said it appeared to him that the most violent Republicans had possession of the Government, and referred to the bill introduced by Mr. Pomeroy to suppress the slave-holder rebellion, and which also contained a provision for the abolition of slavery. He contended that the very title was enough to show that the Constitution was to be put aside. Mr. Bingham (Mich.) asked if he contended this was not a slaveholders' rebellion. Mr. Breckinridge--I do, sir; I do. He then referred to the refusal of last session to make any compromise, though the Southern leaders said they would be satisfied with the Crittenden Compromise. But a
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-battle of Scarytown, Va. Fought July 17 (search)
, they met the party returning. They were not pursued by the rebels. All the dead and a few of the wounded were left oil the field, as they could not be gathered under the enemy's fire. Among the latter was Col. Norton, who is said to have behaved with great bravery. He sustained a severe, though not dangerous flesh wound, and is now in the rebel camp, where, we learn, he is doing well. About thirty of our wounded were brought in by their comrades. The wounds are generally slight. Lieut. Pomeroy and private Mercer, both of the Twenty-first, and private Haven of the Cleveland Artillery, are the only ones, I think, who cannot recover. An official list of the killed, wounded, and missing has been rendered, which places our loss at 57, as follows: killed, 9; wounded, 38; missing, 9. The loss of the enemy must have been fully equal to our own. The greatest misfortune of the day, however, was the loss of Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieut.-Col. Neff, and Captains Austin and H
nant with significance. But later occurrences are not lacking to corroborate this construction of the motive of these bad men. Innumerable lesser lights are constantly developing the sentiment that pervades the public mind of the abolitionists, and their war cry seems with great unanimity to be, down with slavery. Senator Dixon, of Connecticut, has proclaimed in a recent debate in the Congress of the United States, that if slavery stands in the way of the Union, it must be abolished. Pomeroy, of Kansas, another member of that undignified congregation of petty legislators, introduced a bill the other day to suppress those slaveholders' rebellion, containing a provision for the abolition of slavery. Others have uttered sentiments quite as atrocious in relation to the subject. This feeling is exhibiting itself, too, with renewed energy among the old abolition agitators, who but a few years since clamored loudly for disunion, pronouncing the Federal Constitution a league with h