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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George E. Pond or search for George E. Pond in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
d what was expected of a cavalry regiment. In General Early's narrative he gives Wickham's brigade an honorable record and credits them for the work done. George E. Pond, assistant editor of the Army and Navy Journal, has written a book (which is regarded as having General Sheridan's approval), in which he gives Wickham's brig driven their best division of cavalry back upon their infantry, and we had bearded the lion in his den and returned to camp without being pressed. On page 135, Pond's book, we take the following. Sheridan to Halleck, official, August 23d: My position at best was a bad one, and as there is much dependent upon this army, I fello, tis greater glory for us That you remember it, than for ourselves Vainly to report it. But listen to what he has to say a little further on. September 12th, Pond's book, he writes to General Grant. It is exceedingly difficult to attack him (Early) in his position. Opequon creek is a very formidable barrier; there are vario
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
e field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrative, and decide this mever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant)neral Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley and to push them vigorously. Pond says, page 178: Unfortunately Torbert did not succeed in driving Wickham's cavalry from itsidan has already said he could not get at, and that they were in a poor condition! On page 190 Pond says: After the cavalry action at Millford on the 22d, Early had sent in haste for a brigade of Wuster returned, when they withdrew and went back to Front Royal, as has already been described by Pond. Finding that they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Payne with his brigade. (At that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
at one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry dCavalry Division, with General Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley and to push them vigorously. Pond says, page 178: Unfortunately Torbert did not succeed in driving Wickham's cavalry from its strong defensive positio small brigades whom Sheridan has already said he could not get at, and that they were in a poor condition! On page 190 Pond says: After the cavalry action at Millford on the 22d, Early had sent in haste for a brigade of Wickham's force to join hinued to be active until Custer returned, when they withdrew and went back to Front Royal, as has already been described by Pond. Finding that they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Payne with his brigade. (At that time Payne was the Colon