Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Pope or search for Pope in all documents.

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urned to the sky, And beaten by the rain. Joseph O'connor. Such is the death the soldier dies The General's death This sylvan scene, as it looked a few months after the death of General George W. Taylor, on August 27, 1862, recalls Pope's Virginia campaign. Stonewall Jackson in a series of forced marches had swept round to the rear of Pope's army, seized the railroad, and then captured the immense depot of supplies at Manassas Station. To meet him, after an all-day's march fromPope's army, seized the railroad, and then captured the immense depot of supplies at Manassas Station. To meet him, after an all-day's march from near Alexandria on August 26th, Union troops under General Taylor crossed Bull Run near the spot pictured above. They advanced about two miles to occupy the important point Taylor made all the dispositions for an attack on the Confederate force, which at once opened upon the advancing brigade with a heavy discharge of round-shot, shell, and grape. The men nevertheless moved forward undaunted and defiant. Within 300 yards of the earthworks Taylor discovered that he was greatly outnumbered. A
young poet, Sidney Lanier, to write his elegy, beautiful in its serene resignation. He's in the saddle now. Fall in! Steady! the whole brigade! Hill's at the ford, cut off; we'll win His way out, ball and blade! What matter if our shoes are worn? What matter if our feet are torn? ‘Quick step! we're with him before morn!’ That's ‘Stonewall Jackson's way.’ The sun's bright lances rout the mists Of morning, and, by George! Here's Longstreet, struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Dutchmen, whipped before; ‘Bay'nets and grape!’ hear Stonewall roar; ‘Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score!’ In ‘Stonewall Jackson's way.’ Ah, Maiden! wait and watch and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, Widow! read, with eyes that burn, That ring upon thy hand. Ah, Wife! sew on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn; The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in ‘Stonewall's way.’ John Williamson Palmer. The dying words of Stonewall