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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 9 document sections:

Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Run. (search)
After McClellan had been safely housed at his new base on James River, Major General John Pope, of the United States Army, made his appearance in Northern Virginia, e corps of McDowell, Banks, and Fremont, the latter being then under Sigel. General Pope issued a vain-glorious address to his troops, in which he declared that he hd to any further operations. During the night, General Jackson ascertained that Pope's whole army had concentrated in his front, and he therefore determined not to aeparing to move back to our former position south of the Rapidan, as the army of Pope concentrated in our front was entirely too large for us to fight. Our movement In this action, Banks commanded the Federal troops immediately on the field, but Pope came up at its close with a portion of McDowell's Corps and the whole of Sigel'sce), besides securing one piece of artillery and more than 5,000 small arms. Pope, or at least his soldiers, had now seen something more of the rebels than their
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 10: operations on the Rappahannock. (search)
rapidly as possible, for the purpose of uniting with Pope, and interposing for the defence of Washington-Burns. B. Mcclellan: A dispatch just received from General Pope, says that deserters report that the enemy is mo1862, 10 A. M. Major General G. B. McClellan: General Pope again telegraphs that the enemy is reported to bto Gordonsville for the purpose of advancing against Pope, and the three first named arrived about the 15th of receiving large reinforcements from the South. General Pope's army, now covering Washington, is only about 4. You are about thirty miles from Richmond, and General Pope eighty or ninety, with the enemy directly betweeRegiment, Colonel William Smith, joined my brigade. Pope's army, then reinforced by the greater part of Burnsanied Stuart on a raid to Catlett's Station and upon Pope's headquarters, arrived from the direction of Warreneyond the reach of our artillery on the south bank. Pope's whole army was in easy supporting distance of the
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 11: capture of Manassas Junction. (search)
ion of his cavalry, after crossing the river above, had made a raid to Catlett's Station and upon Pope's headquarters at Warrenton Junction, and among other things had captured Pope's dispatch book. Pope's dispatch book. The captured correspondence showed that Pope was being reinforced from the Kanawha Valley and also from McClellan's army, and General Lee determined to send General Jackson to the enemy's rear, to Pope was being reinforced from the Kanawha Valley and also from McClellan's army, and General Lee determined to send General Jackson to the enemy's rear, to cut the railroad, so as to destroy his communications and bring on a general engagement before the whole of the approaching reinforcements could arrive. Jackson's wing of the army was put in motio General Jackson to remain at Bristow with his three remaining brigades to check any advance from Pope's army along the railroad, but, if the enemy appeared in heavy force, to retire upon the Junction shots from the artillery, but the enemy's main force, which consisted of the advance division of Pope's army under Hooker, did not come further than the station. Shortly after dark, under orders
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 12: the affair at Groveton. (search)
Chapter 12: the affair at Groveton. It having become evident that Pope had found it necessary to look after his lines of retreat, and was moving his whole army back for the purpose of falling upon General Jackson's comparatively small force, the latter determined to move to the left so as to be in a position to unite with the right wing of General Lee's army under Longstreet. Jackson's division, under Brigadier General W. S. Taliaferro, had therefore been moved on the night of the 27th to the vicinity of the battlefield of the 21st of July, 1861, and A. P. Hill's to Centreville, with orders to Ewell to move up, by the northern bank of Bull Run, to the same locality with Taliaferro early on the morning of the 28th. At dawn on that morning, my brigade resumed the march, moving across Bull Run at Blackburn's Ford and then up the north bank to Stone Bridge, followed by Trimble's brigade. We crossed at a ford just below Stone Bridge, and moved across the Warrenton Pike and through
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 13: second battle of Manassas. (search)
s Corps moving on the left flank of that corps, with which the engagement took place on the afternoon of the 28th, had retreated in the direction of Manassas, other troops had moved up to the vicinity, and early next morning it was discovered that Pope was moving his whole army against us from the direction of Manassas and Centreville, to which point it had gone in search of us. It now became necessary to change our front to meet the approaching columns, and Ewell's division, under the commason had accomplished his purpose of resisting the enemy until General Lee with Longstreet's force could effect a junction with him. The latter force was now up and a part of it had been engaged just about night with one of the enemy's columns. Pope, in his report, claims that General Jackson was retreating through Thoroughfare Gap, when his attack arrested this retreat and compelled Jackson to take position to defend himself, and that he drove our troops several miles, but there was no thoug
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
vered that the enemy had retired from our front, and during that day Pope made good his escape into the fortifications around Washington. He air at Ox Hill closed the series of engagements with the enemy under Pope, and it was again the old story of the rebels in overwhelming numbers, opposed to a small army of Union soldiers. According to Pope's account, his army was wearied out and broken down by the fatigues of the caons were short, their chances of supplying themselves were slim. Pope's army had at the time of the battles of the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30 and in the letter of Halleck to McClellan, dated the 6th of August, Pope's army is stated to be about 40,000. In a telegram from Halleck to the battles around Richmond or before or during the campaign against Pope or the campaign in Maryland. D. H. Hill's division of five brigades; 2nd, the day after the affair at Ox Hill, and Walker later, so that Pope had only to confront the 29 brigades before mentioned. My brigade w
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 16: battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam. (search)
s South Mountain in the direction of Hagerstown, and the division of General D. H. Hill had been left to defend Boonsboro Gap against the Federal Army, composed of Pope's army and McClellan's army combined, and heavy reinforcements which had arrived to their assistance, now approaching under General McClellan. General Hill had beee18,400 Artillery, estimated at 400 guns6,000 Total97,445 It is to be presumed that this estimate was made by Banks when General Jackson was figuring around Pope's rear, as he did not have a command in McClellan's army, and it is well known that Banks always saw things with very largely magnifying glasses when Stonewall Jacassigned to the command of this army in Washington, it was suffering under the disheartening influence of defeat. It had been greatly reduced by casualties in General Pope's campaign, and its efficiency had been much impaired. The sanguinary battles of South Mountain and An- tietam Creek had resulted in a loss to us of ten gener
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 28: devastation of the country. (search)
red that Meade's army had almost entirely devastated that county. Many beautiful residences of gentlemen had been pulled down, and some within sight of Meade's own headquarters, for the purpose of making huts for the soldiers and chimneys to the officers' tents. It was a scene of desolation, and the population was almost gone. I had been on the track of this army under all the other commanders, but I think it committed more depredations under Meade than under any of the rest, not excepting Pope himself. After resuming our positions on the Rapidan, the condition of things was pretty much as it had been before, the enemy making some demonstrations but no serious movement until the last of the month. A little after the middle of the month, General Ewell's health had been impaired, and I succeeded temporarily to the command of the corps. There had been some demonstrations with the enemy's cavalry force, and General Lee, apprehending that the enemy might attempt to turn our r
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
5, 262, 386, 394 Pickett, General, 163, 236, 275, 342, 360 Piedmont, 165, 370, 374-75-76, 382, 434 Piedmont Station, 11 Pisgah Church, 105, 285 Pittsylvania House, 26 Pitzer, Major A. L., 107, 187, 211, 220, 226-27, 377 Plank Road, 167, 169, 182, 203-212, 214, 216, 218, 220, 222-23, 225- 233, 317-18, 320, 322, 324, 344, 351-52 Pleasant Valley, 154 Plymouth, 340 Po River, 353-54-55, 357 Point Lookout, 385-86, 390 Pole Green Church, 361, 362 Poolsville, 394 Pope, General (U. S. A.), 40, 92, 102- 106, 110, 112, 114-15, 117, 119, 122, 131-32-33, 139 Port Conway, 185 Port Republic, 75, 139, 366, 369-70, 432-33-34, 475 Port Royal, 166, 168, 179, 184-85, 189, 477 Port Tobacco, 184 Porter, General (U. S. A.), 131, 152 Posey, General C., 231, 233 Potomac District, 51 Potomac River, 4, 33, 40-41-42-43, 45-46-47-48, 51, 91, 134-141, 146, 152, 154-55, 157, 160, 237, 253-55, 277, 281-82, 284, 297, 326, 332, 366-69, 371, 380, 382- 384, 386, 3