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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
to receive an attack from the enemy.) The day before Captain Pope had mounted on the Richmond's forecastle one of his 9-iOne of them lodged in a drawer of the bureau containing Captain Pope's clothes, and there seemed to have spent itself, withoe shot from our ships falling short, it was reported to Captain Pope that several boats filled with men were leaving the Vin officers, presented himself on the quarter-deck before Captain Pope, with the American flag wrapped around his waist in larond. Capt. Handy's reception on board the flagship by Capt. Pope was not a flattering one. He was immediately ordered baey crossed the bar and anchored safely in deep water. Capt. Pope in his report of this unhappy affair says: My retrer when I leave her? Respectfully, Robert Handy. Capt. Pope seemed quite aware of the ludicrousness of this propositer from falling into their hands. Respectfully, etc., John Pope, Captain, U. S. N. Com. Robert Handy, U. S. N., Commandi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
Having established his batteries, it was Gen. Pope's intention to cross the river with his armyon saw that it was a positive necessity that Gen. Pope should transport his troops to the opposite dron that the Carondelet was safe, and that General Pope could now bid defiance to the enemy's gun-bmed with long-range rifles, had been harrassing Pope's command from below, and from their position c deal of havoc to the light transports on which Pope depended to pass his troops over the river. Ththe turning point in the siege, and to this General Pope had looked forward from the time he moved h The credit, however, fell where it was due, to Pope and Foote, for their harmonious co-operation, aquered by a combined army and navy force. Gen. Pope, with twenty thousand men in transports prot but nothing could be learned concerning it. Pope's first idea was to reach the enemy's works by f Island 10, and finally, to the capture by General Pope, of the forts on the Tennessee shore, and t[14 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
atter of time, and that the Union forces must win in the end. The Confederate troops at Iuka, Corinth and other places in West Tennessee, were being gradually driven back, and once more the base of operations was to undergo a change in obedience to the law of strategy. Fort Pillow had to be evacuated, and when the Confederates did evacuate a position they generally did so with an unaccountable haste. In this case they may have heard that an army was marching on them from the rear, or that Pope was returning with a great force from Pittsburg Landing. Whatever it was, something had a very demoralizing effect upon the garrison, and the guns of the fort were no longer well aimed or rapidly fired. On the night of June 4th, a great many explosions were heard in the fort, which indicated to the officers of the fleet that the enemy was preparing to evacuate. The Flag-officer on receiving this intelligence, gave orders for the gun-boats to get under way at 4 o'clock on the morning of J
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
of-Marines; John Dwyer, First-class Fireman; Thomas Salmon and Patrick O'Conner, Second-class Firemen; Geo. H. Harrison and George Andrew, Ordinary Seamen; Charles Moore, Seaman; George A. Whipple, Ordinary Seaman; Edward Wallace, Seaman; Thomas Marsh, Coalheaver; Thomas Buckley, Ordinary Seaman; Edward Wilt, Captain-of-Top; Geo. H. Kinnie, Ordinary Seaman; Augustus Johnson, Jeremiah Horrigan, William O'Halloran and William Turner, Seamen; Joshua Collins and James McBeath, Ordinary Seamen; John Pope, Coalheaver; Charles Mattison, Ordinary Seaman; George Baker, Timothy G. Cauty, John Shields, Thomas Alloway, Philip Weeks and Wm. Barnes, Landsmen; George E. Smart, Second-class Fireman; Chas. A. Poole, Timothy Lynch, Sylvanus P. Brackett and John W. Sanborn, Coal-heavers; W. H. Donnally, First-class Fireman. All the above natives of the United States. Win. Alsdorf and Clement Antoine, Coalheavers; Jose Dabney, Landsmen; Benjamin Button and Jean Briset, Coalheavers; Vanburn Francois, La
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Petty officers and crew. (search)
of-Marines; John Dwyer, First-class Fireman; Thomas Salmon and Patrick O'Conner, Second-class Firemen; Geo. H. Harrison and George Andrew, Ordinary Seamen; Charles Moore, Seaman; George A. Whipple, Ordinary Seaman; Edward Wallace, Seaman; Thomas Marsh, Coalheaver; Thomas Buckley, Ordinary Seaman; Edward Wilt, Captain-of-Top; Geo. H. Kinnie, Ordinary Seaman; Augustus Johnson, Jeremiah Horrigan, William O'Halloran and William Turner, Seamen; Joshua Collins and James McBeath, Ordinary Seamen; John Pope, Coalheaver; Charles Mattison, Ordinary Seaman; George Baker, Timothy G. Cauty, John Shields, Thomas Alloway, Philip Weeks and Wm. Barnes, Landsmen; George E. Smart, Second-class Fireman; Chas. A. Poole, Timothy Lynch, Sylvanus P. Brackett and John W. Sanborn, Coal-heavers; W. H. Donnally, First-class Fireman. All the above natives of the United States. Win. Alsdorf and Clement Antoine, Coalheavers; Jose Dabney, Landsmen; Benjamin Button and Jean Briset, Coalheavers; Vanburn Francois, La