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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
master, he contributed more to the establishment of American independence than many whose names are proudly emblazoned on the page of history. In the language of Pope, The noblest work of God is an honest man. There was more truth in this old homely epitaph probably than in many more elegant and heroic inscriptions upon towee hero from the first battlefield of the war desire his encomiums upon their courage? Need they boast that they were men who had fought and defeated McClellan and Pope, and Burnside and Hooker and Rosencranz; who had driven McClellan to his gunboats and chased Pope to Washington; who had slaughtered Burnside at Fredericksburg anPope to Washington; who had slaughtered Burnside at Fredericksburg and routed Hooker at Chancellorsville; who had held Fort Sumter against all comers; who had left their dead from Charleston to Gettysburg, from Gettysburg to Chickamauga, and from Chickamauga to Knoxville, and from Knoxville to the Wilderness; who had defeated a much greater man than Sherman—Grant himself—in every engagement from th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal Corps in the Confederate States army. (search)
ure of ruin and desolation. The parapet was plowed up in every direction and torn to pieces. Trees were hacked down and torn to shreds by the heavy shells and the rifled cannon. The signal men at Battery No. 1 had no protection whatever—not even that of the parapet behind which the gunners squatted when not firing—for their position was in rear of the guns, where fell, as Captain Rucker says, many shot and shell. Upon the capture of New Madrid and Island No.10 by Admiral Foote and General Pope, the signal party escaped across Reelfoot lake, taking French leave of the commanding generals and paddling across on a raft of their own construction They repaired at once, of their own motion and without orders, to Corinth, Mississippi, then headquarters of the army, and reported for duty. The signal officer is merely mentioned by General Beauregard in his report of the fight at Shiloh Chapel (or Pittsburg landing) as doing active staff duty. After the battle, seventeen men were detai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Colonel Edward McCrady, Jr. before Company a (Gregg's regiment), First S. C. Volunteers, at the Reunion at Williston, Barnwell county, S. C, 14th July, 1882. (search)
on an open field, and an answer to this boast that we would fight three to one. No victory by mere strategical skill, aided by gunboats, would appease the Northern desire that the Army of Northern Virginia should be whipped on a fair field. So Pope was tried; and you recollect, my comrades, that after a march of sixty miles in two days, on three ears of green corn apiece for rations, we broke our fast on Westphalia hams, Mocha coffee, and sherry wine out of his stores, and sent him back to Washington to tell that he was mistaken in telegraphing that he had captured Jackson and his corps. During those two terrible days (August 28-29), before Longstreet came up, our corps of 17,309 men withstood Pope's army of 74,578—you recollect with what terrible sacrifice to our brigade; and in the great battle of the 30th, after Longstreet had joined us, we had but 49,077 of all arms, and yet we gained a second victory on Manassas plains. At Sharpsburg you fought 35,255 under Lee against 87,16
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
, next to those of Grant and Sherman, were from our own soil. From West Point there came forth forty-five graduates of Southern birth, who became Federal Generals. I have their names, from George H. Thomas and George Sykes to David Hunter and John Pope, with the States of their nativity, viz: George H. Thomas, Va.; George Sykes, Del.; E. O. C. Ord, Md; R. C. Buchanan, Md.; E. R. S. Canby, Ky.; Jesse L. Reno, Va.; John Newton, Va.; R. W. Johnson, Ky.; J. J. Reynolds, Ky.; J. M. Brannan, D. C.;.; B. S. Alexander, Ky.; E. B. Alexander, Ky.; Washington Seawell, Va.; P. S. Cook, Va.; G. R. Paul, Mo.; W. H. Emory, Md.; R. H. K. Whitely, Md.; W. H. French, Md.; H. D. Wallen, Mo.; J. L. Donaldson, Md.; Fred T. Dent, Mo.; David Hunter, Va.; John Pope, Ky. Most of these were good officers, and some of them were superb. I could name six or eight of them who did the very best they could for their native land by going on the Federal side. In addition to these forty-five West Point Southerners
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
h, Battle of, 232. Polk, Gen. L., 43, 69, 80, 81, 204; address of, to army, 229; criticizes Gen. Pillow, 74; 301, 311, 370, 385. Polk, Capt. Marshall T., 71. Polybius, 93. Poole, Capt. W. G., 304. Poore, Major, 66. Pond, Col., 303. Pope, Gen. John, 31, 97, 257. Pope, Capt. Y. I., 379. Porter, Rev., A. Toomer, 142. Porter, Gov. James D., 352. Porterfield, Col., Geo. A., Narrative of Services, 1861-1861, 82, 88. Port Royal captured, 122. Powell, Sergeant J. L., 92. Pope, Capt. Y. I., 379. Porter, Rev., A. Toomer, 142. Porter, Gov. James D., 352. Porterfield, Col., Geo. A., Narrative of Services, 1861-1861, 82, 88. Port Royal captured, 122. Powell, Sergeant J. L., 92. Pratt, Capt , 48, 52. Pray. Lt. A. W., 20. Prentiss, Gen., 301, 306; his cavalry, 62, 64. Presidents of the U. S. born North and South, 431, 436. Pressley, H. M., 175. Pressley. Col. J. G., 116, 134, 189 Preston, Gen. John S , 32. Preston, Col. J. T. L., 44. Preston. Gen Wm., 274. Price, Gen., Sterling. 81. Prieur. D., and Col. E. Waggaman, Duel of, 447. Prince, A. H., 396 Pryor Gen. Roger A., 183 Purcell, John, 208. Quarles, Gen., 107. Quinine, Price of, 149 Q