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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for S. J. Pope or search for S. J. Pope in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s Of morning; and, by George! Here's Longstreet struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees whipped before, ‘Bayonets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay olecture before the Maryland Line, by General J. A. Early, on Stonewall Jackson's Campaign against Pope. We acknowledge the courtesy of invitations to attend the lecture and banquet, and very much regttalion marched with General Lee's army, and at Rappahannock Station engaged the batteries of General Pope, and then moved forward through Thoroughfare Gap. Manassas's great battle, of two days duration, followed, resulting in the defeat and flight of Pope's army, notwithstanding his vain glorious proclamation from headquarters in the saddle. The greatest compliment the Washington Artillery evereday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operation
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson's way. (search)
es to scoff; Attention! it's his way. Appealing from his native sod, In forma pauperis, to God, “Lay bare thine arms! Stretch forth thy rod; Amen!” —that's Stonewall's way. He's in the saddle now. Fall in! Steady, the whole brigade! Hill's at the ford, cut off. We'll win His way out, ball and blade. What matter if our shoes are worn? What matter if our feet are torn? Quick step! We're with him before dawn. That's Stonewall Jackson's way. The sun's bright lances rout the mists Of morning; and, by George! Here's Longstreet struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees whipped before, ‘Bayonets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score In Stonewall Jackson's way! Ah, maiden! wait and watch, and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, widow! read with eyes that burn That ring upon thy hand. Ah, wife! sew on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn, The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in Stonew
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
onding Secretary and Treasurer, R. M. Blundon, Secretary, Colonel J. Lyle Clarke, Wm. P. Zollinger, R. W. Gwathmey, Dr. Wm. H. Cole, M. O. Shriver), by whose efficient work this splendid success was achieved. the annual Reunion and banquet of the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland, will take place on the evening of the 22nd of February, and will be preceded by a lecture before the Maryland Line, by General J. A. Early, on Stonewall Jackson's Campaign against Pope. We acknowledge the courtesy of invitations to attend the lecture and banquet, and very much regret that our Southern tour will compel us to forego our full purpose of being present. We hope, however, that we shall have the privilege of publishing General Early's paper, which will, doubtless, be an able and valuable discussion of that splendid campaign. the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia held its annual Reunion and Banquet in New Orleans on the 22nd of January. It
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
es's Mill, Savage Station, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, will attest. Leaving McClellan upon the James, after his famous change of base, the battalion marched with General Lee's army, and at Rappahannock Station engaged the batteries of General Pope, and then moved forward through Thoroughfare Gap. Manassas's great battle, of two days duration, followed, resulting in the defeat and flight of Pope's army, notwithstanding his vain glorious proclamation from headquarters in the saddle. ThePope's army, notwithstanding his vain glorious proclamation from headquarters in the saddle. The greatest compliment the Washington Artillery ever received was from the great Stonewall, who, on this occasion, turned to General Longstreet and said: General, your artillery is much superior to mine. On to Maryland! was then the cry, and the heads of columns were directed to the Potomac, and the river was forded with the high hope of winning peace upon the soil of that State, but, alas, at Sharpsburg, from early morn till dewy eve, we fought till To the right, to the left and around,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
nd—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders. He is not careful to state the strength of the f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
awoke feeling badly, and as the rain was still falling, I sought shelter in a car attached for the sick. At half past 2 o'clock, we started at a snail's pace, and reached Humboldt at seven o'clock this morning having travelled seventy-nine miles in nineteen hours. I suffered greatly from hunger and thirst. At Humboldt I got a good breakfast, and at nine o'clock, we were off for Jackson. I was obliged to ride in an open platform car, and notwithstanding Miss Fackler's comfortable helmet, Mrs. Pope's gloves, and mother's overcoat, I suffered intensely from the cold. Enjoyed a fine dinner at the Jackson City Hotel; but had to borrow money to pay for it, as I had loaned my last cent to my hungry comrades to get breakfast at Humboldt. Such is my experience of the retreat from Columbus. March 4th.—Humboldt. Left Jackson this morning at 8 o'clock, and rejoined my regiment at this place. Arrived here at ten o'clock, and pitched tents in the afternoon. Lost my knapsack with several
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
his aim, and at the same time Grant had reduced Vicksburg. The government at Washington deemed it all important to their arms that the success of Rosecrans should be utilized and his position, at all hazards, maintained. To effect this, and to prevent a flank movement on Rosecrans's right flank, through Alabama, General Halleck at once sent telegrams to Generals Burnside, in East Tennessee; Hurlburt, at Memphis; Grant, or Sherman, at Vicksburg; also to General Schofield, in Missouri, and Pope, in command of the Northwestern Department, to hasten forward to the Tennessee line every available man in their departments, and the commanding officers in Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, were ordered to make every possible exertion to secure General Rosecrans's line of communication. And learning that Longstreet had been ordered to Bragg, Meade was ordered to attack General Lee, at least to threaten him, so as to prevent him from sending off any more troops. In the meanwhile Thomas's corps,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Conner's South Carolina brigade at Cedar Creek, October 19th, 1864. (search)
ied admiration. It would, perhaps, be invidious for me to discriminate or attempt to allot to each and all a due proportion of praise, but I may say that to the commanding officers of each of the organizations I am greatly indebted, not only for prompt obedience of orders, but for skill and gallantry displayed in the handling of their men. For a full and detailed account of the operations of each command I refer you to the reports herewith enclosed. I am also greatly indebted to Lieutenant S. J. Pope, of the Third South Carolina regiment, acting Assistant Adjutant-General, and to Cadet E. P. Harllee, acting Inspector, for the very efficient aid rendered me during the day, and for a conspicuous display of bravery on every occasion to call it forth. The former was severely wounded, losing an eye, and the latter slightly. One of my couriers, D'Saussure Burrows, was shot through the head whilst riding by my side. Couriers Crumley and Templeton. also deserve honorable mention f