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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, X. Raw recruits. (search)
n. Instead of interposing an emphatic objection, as he had done the previous year, he said, in substance, Well, you know I do not want you to go, but it is very evident that a great many more must go, and if you have fully determined upon it I shall not object. Having already determined upon the arm of the service which I should enter, accompanied by three other acquaintances of the same opinion, two of them the school-fellows mentioned, I started for Cambridge, with a view of seeing Captain Porter, who was then at home recruiting for the First Massachusetts Battery, which he commanded, and enlisting with him, as there were at least two men in his company who were fellow-townsmen. But we were much disappointed when the Captain informed us that his company was now recruited to the number required. However, we directed our steps back to Boston without delay, and there, in the second story of the Old State House, enlisted in a new organization then rapidly filling. Here is a cop
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. (search)
e ocean ports. Almost as damaging, in another regard, were the occupation of New Orleans, and the final stoppage of communication with the trans-Mississippi by the capture of Vicksburg. The Heroic City had long been sole point of contact with the vast productive tracts, beyond the great river. The story were twicetold of a resistance-unequaled even by that at Charleston and beginning with first Union access to the river, by way of New Orleans. But, in May, 1862, the combined fleets of Porter and Farragut from the South, and Davis from the North, rained shot and shell into the coveted town for six terrible weeks. Failing reduction, they withdrew on June 24th; leaving her banners inscribed-Vicksburg vicrix! In May of the next year, another concentration was made on the key of the Mississippi; General Grant marching his army one hundred and fifty miles from its base, to get in rear of Vicksburg and cut off its relief. The very audacity of this plan may blind the careless thin
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
on. It does not seem to have occurred to him that the soldiers of the army which thus wearied his own were at all susceptible of fatigue or hunger, or that when his own rations were short, their chances of supplying themselves were slim. Pope's army had at the time of the battles of the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th of August, been reinforced by Burnside's corps under Reno, one brigade of Sturgis' division from Alexandria, and the following troops from McClellan's army: Heintzelman's corps, Porter's corps, and the division of Pennsylvania reserves commanded by Reynolds. At the time of the affair at Ox Hill he had been further reinforced by Franklin's and Sumner's corps of McClellan's army, leaving but one corps of that army (Keyes') which had not reached him. His consolidated report of the 31st of July showed a strength of 46,858 before he was joined by any of those reinforcements and in the letter of Halleck to McClellan, dated the 6th of August, Pope's army is stated to be about 4
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 16: battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam. (search)
's brigades and a part of Anderson's division, which had arrived to his support. The enemy had then made the attack with Burnside's corps, numbering 13,819, on Longstreet's right, on the Antietam, held by D. R. Jones' division, which was repulsed on the arrival of Hill's brigades as stated. The above is a condensed account of the main features of this battle taken from the reports of both sides, and the figures in regard to the strength of McClellan's corps are taken from his own report. Porter's corps of his army, numbering 12,930, was held in reserve. Walker's division of two brigades (his own and Ransom's) had reached the vicinity of the battlefield on the 16th and McLaws' division, and Anderson's, including the three brigades of Longstreet's with him, did not get up until after the battle had begun. Late in the afternoon, after it had become apparent that no further attack on our left was to be made, I rode to the rear in search of the missing brigades and found about on
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
nk Road, 167, 169, 182, 203-212, 214, 216, 218, 220, 222-23, 225- 233, 317-18, 320, 322, 324, 344, 351-52 Pleasant Valley, 154 Plymouth, 340 Po River, 353-54-55, 357 Point Lookout, 385-86, 390 Pole Green Church, 361, 362 Poolsville, 394 Pope, General (U. S. A.), 40, 92, 102- 106, 110, 112, 114-15, 117, 119, 122, 131-32-33, 139 Port Conway, 185 Port Republic, 75, 139, 366, 369-70, 432-33-34, 475 Port Royal, 166, 168, 179, 184-85, 189, 477 Port Tobacco, 184 Porter, General (U. S. A.), 131, 152 Posey, General C., 231, 233 Potomac District, 51 Potomac River, 4, 33, 40-41-42-43, 45-46-47-48, 51, 91, 134-141, 146, 152, 154-55, 157, 160, 237, 253-55, 277, 281-82, 284, 297, 326, 332, 366-69, 371, 380, 382- 384, 386, 391-94, 398, 400-404, 409, 415, 475 Potts' Mountain, 331 Pound Gap, 462 Powell, Captain, 444 Powell Fort Valley, 367 Powell's Division (U. S. A.), 454 Pratt, 184, 193, 196, 200, 201 Preston, Colonel R. T., 2 Preston, Gene
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 13 (search)
e crowd. March 8 Gen. Winder has appointed Capt. Godwin Provost Marshal. March 9 Gen. Winder has appointed Col. Porter Provost Marshal,--Godwin not being high enough in rank, I suppose. March 10 One of the friends of the Secretary d up and issued by three or four of the Provost Marshal's clerks, who are governed mainly by my directions, as neither Col. Porter nor the clerks, nor Gen. Winder himself, have the slightest idea of the geography of the country occupied by the enemy well as the detectives, and the latter intend to remain here to my great chagrin. March 14 The Provost Marshal, Col. Porter, has had new passports printed, to which his own name is to be appended. I am requested to sign it for him, and to inhips of war. My friends, Lieutenants Parker and Minor, partook of the glory, and were severely wounded. March 17 Col. Porter has resigned his provost marshalship, and is again succeeded by Capt. Godwin, a Virginian, and I like him very well, f
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, XXXI. (search)
ence, but, boy-like, Tad soon forgot his promise, and was as noisy as ever. Upon reaching their destination, however, he said very promptly, Father, I want my dollar. Mr. Lincoln turned to him with the inquiry: Tad, do you think you have earned it? Yes, was the sturdy reply. Mr. Lincoln looked at him half reproachfully for an instant, and then taking from his pocket-book a dollar note, he said: Well, my son, at any rate, I will keep my part of the bargain. While paying a visit to Commodore Porter at Fortress Monroe, on one occasion, an incident occurred, related by Lieutenant Braine, one of the officers on board the flag-ship, to my friend the Rev. Mr. Ewer, of New York. Noticing that the banks of the river were dotted with spring blossoms, the President said, with the manner of one asking a special favor: Commodore, Tad is very fond of flowers;--won't you let a couple of your men take a boat and go with him for an hour or two along shore, and gather a few?--it will be a great
by way of Ashland. We learn that we certainly whipped the Yankees on the 31st of May and 1st of June, and that Jackson has had a most glorious campaign in the Valley. We are grieved to hear that the gallant Ashby has been killed, and trust that it is a mere rumour, and that God has spared his valuable life. My sons were not in the late fight, but are stationed at Strawberry Hill, the home of my childhood. Every thing is being stolen on these two places and elsewhere. A lieutenant on General Porter's staff rode up this evening to ask M. to sell him butter, fowls, eggs, etc. She told him that her poultryyard had been robbed the night before by some of his men. He professed great horror, but had not gone fifty yards when we heard the report of a pistol, and this wonderfully proper lieutenant of a moment before had shot the hog of an old negro woman who lives here. June 14th, 1862. While quietly sitting on the porch yesterday evening, I saw a young man rapidly approaching the ho
June 13th, 1862. Good news at last. Four letters were received last night by way of Ashland. We learn that we certainly whipped the Yankees on the 31st of May and 1st of June, and that Jackson has had a most glorious campaign in the Valley. We are grieved to hear that the gallant Ashby has been killed, and trust that it is a mere rumour, and that God has spared his valuable life. My sons were not in the late fight, but are stationed at Strawberry Hill, the home of my childhood. Every thing is being stolen on these two places and elsewhere. A lieutenant on General Porter's staff rode up this evening to ask M. to sell him butter, fowls, eggs, etc. She told him that her poultryyard had been robbed the night before by some of his men. He professed great horror, but had not gone fifty yards when we heard the report of a pistol, and this wonderfully proper lieutenant of a moment before had shot the hog of an old negro woman who lives here.
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ey, per plate$3.50 Chicken, per plate3.50 Rock fish, per plate5.00 Roast beef, per plate3.00 Beefsteak, per dish3.50 Ham and eggs3.50 Boiled eggs2.00 Fried oysters5.00 Raw oysters3.00 Cabbage1.00 Potatoes1.00 Pure coffee, per cup3.00 Pure tea, per cup2.00 Fresh milk1.00 Bread and butter1.00 Wines, per Bottle. Champagne$50.00 Madeira50.00 Port25.00 Claret20.00 Sherry35.00 Liquors, per Drink. French brandy3.00 Rye whiskey2.00 Apple brandy2.00 Malt Liquors, per Bottle. Porter12.00 Ale12.00 Ale, one-half bottle6.00 Cigars. Fine Havana1.00 Game of all kinds in season. Terrapins served up in every style. Bill for a dinner for nine poor Confederates at the Oriental, January 17, 1864. Soup for nine$13 50Brought forward$132 50 Venison steak31 50Apples12 00 Fried potatoes9 005 bottles of Madeira250 00 Seven birds24 006 bottles of claret120 00 Baked potatoes9 00Urn cocktail65 00 Celery13 50Jelly20 00 Bread and butter14 00Cake20 00 Coffee18 001 dozen ci
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