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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
Richardson's); Hunter's Second Division, containing 2 brigades (Andrew Porter's and Burnside's); Heintzelman's Third Division, containing 3 b repulsed but pursued the troops that made the attack upon him. Andrew Porter's brigade of Hunter's division followed Burnside closely and caound chosen by the latter. The opposing forces were Burnside's and Porter's brigades, with one regiment of Heintzelman's division on the FedecDowell had at hand the brigades of Franklin, Willcox, Sherman, and Porter, Palmer's battalion of regular cavalry, and Ricketts's and Griffin's regular batteries. Porter's brigade had been reduced and shaken by the morning fight. Howard's brigade was in reserve and only came into a and flowed as McDowell pushed in Franklin's, Willcox's, Sherman's, Porter's, and at last Howard's brigades, and as Beauregard put into actionort, Arnold at my direction joined Sykes's battalion of infantry of Porter's brigade and Palmer's battalion of cavalry, all of the regular arm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
ll G, 1st U. S. Arty., Lieut. John Edwards M, 2d U. S. Arty., Capt. Henry J. Hunt. This brigade was only slightly engaged in front of Blackburn's Ford, with the loss of one officer killed. Second division Col. D. Hunter (w) Col. Andrew Porter. Staff loss: w, 1; m, 1=2. First Brigade, Col. Andrew Porter 8th N. Y. (militia), Col. Geo. Lyons 14th N. Y. (militia), Col. A. M. Wood (w and c), Lieut.-Col. E. B. Fowler 27th N. Y., Col. H. W. Slocum (w), Major J. J. Bartlett Col. Andrew Porter 8th N. Y. (militia), Col. Geo. Lyons 14th N. Y. (militia), Col. A. M. Wood (w and c), Lieut.-Col. E. B. Fowler 27th N. Y., Col. H. W. Slocum (w), Major J. J. Bartlett Battalion U. S. Infantry, Major George Sykes Battalion U. S. Marines, Major J. G. Reynolds Battalion U. S. Cavalry, Major I. N. Palmer D, 5th U. S. Arty., Capt. Charles Griffin Brigade loss: k, 86; w, 177; m, 201 = 464. Second Brigade, Col. Ambrose E. Burnside 2d N. H., Col. Gilman Marston (w), Lieut.-Col. F. S. Fiske 1st R. I., Major J. P. Balch 2d R. I. (with battery), Col. John S. Slocum (k), Lieut.-Col. Frank Wheaton 71st N. Y. (with two howitzers), Col. H. P. Mar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
the broad, level top of the hill south of the turnpike, Bee, appreciating the strength of the position, formed his troops (half of his own and half of Bartow's brigade) on that ground. But seeing Evans struggling against great odds, he crossed the valley and formed on the right and a little in advance of him. Here the 5 or 6 regiments, with 6 field-pieces, held their ground for an hour against 10,000 or 12,000 United States troops, General Fry (page 185) states that these troops were Andrew Porter's and Burnside's brigades, and one regiment of Heintzelman's division. Reckoning by the estimate of strength given by General Fry on page 194 these would have made a total of about 6500 men.-editors. when, finding they were overlapped on each flank by the continually arriving enemy, General Bee fell back to the position from which he had moved to rescue Evans — crossing the valley, closely pressed by the Federal army. Hampton with his Legion reached the valley as the retrograde move
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
e Lafayette and Choctaw, of one thousand tons each, well-built side-wheelers, which the Government purchased and altered into casemate iron-clads fitted with rams. Still later, three turreted iron-clads of light draft, the Osage, Ozark, and Neosho [see page 342], were added to the squadron. The above, together with a number of captured gun-boats, the foremost of which was the Eastport, and a few wooden steamers of various size and miscellaneous description, made up the force with which Admiral Porter conducted his wonderful series of operations from the autumn of 1862 until his transfer to the North Atlantic Squadron in 1864. In addition to these vessels, which constituted the regular naval force, special mention must be made of the Ram Fleet, as it was called. This fleet was the really brilliant conception of Colonel Charles Ellet, Jr., a civil engineer who, as has been already said, had called attention, some years before the war, to the renewed importance of the ram as a nava
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
land, General Foster's brigade taking the lead, followed by Reno's and Parke's. By 10 o'clock a force of about 7500 strong had been landed. One of the two sections of a boat-gun battery manned by men of the Union Coast Guard, in charge of Midshipman Porter, was stationed well out to the front, supported by the 21st Massachusetts; the other troops bivouacked in an open field, where before morning they were thoroughly drenched by a most uncomfortable cold rain. The morning was cold and cheerless and the breakfast was poor, but the troops were in fine spirits. Foster was the first to move, the 25th Massachusetts in the advance, followed by Midshipman Porter's guns. The enemy's pickets gradually retired into an earth-work mounting three guns, situated in the center of a morass, flanked on each side by an almost impenetrable swamp, and protected in front by an open field of deep mud, in part covered by fallen trees with their limbs cut short and sharpened. General Foster, as s
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico (search)
eorge Crittenden, a rebel general; S. B. Buckner, who surrendered Fort Donelson; and Mansfield Lovell, who commanded at New Orleans before that city fell into the hands of the National troops. Of those who remained on our side there were Captain Andrew Porter, Lieutenant C. P. Stone and Lieutenant Z. B. Tower. There were quite a number of other officers, whose names I cannot recollect. At a little village (Ozumba) near the base of Popocatapetl, where we purposed to commence the ascent, weounded the assembly, and soldiers rushed from the guard-house in the edge of the town towards us. Our party halted, and I tied a white pocket handkerchief to a stick and, using it as a flag of truce, proceeded on to the town. Captains Sibley and Porter followed a few hundred yards behind. I was detained at the guard-house until a messenger could be dispatched to the quarters of the commanding general, who authorized that I should be conducted to him. I had been with the general but a few minut
e Indians, and commanded a battalion in the battle of Blue Licks, August 1782, where his brother, John Todd, was killed. He succeeded Daniel Boone in command of the militia, ranking as major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779, he married Miss Jane Briggs. The seventh child of this union, born February 25, 1791, was Robert S. Todd, the father of Mrs. Lincoln. On her maternal side Mrs. Lincoln was highly connected. Her great-grandfather, General Andrew Porter, was in the war of the Revolution. He succeeded Peter Muhlenberg as major-general of the Pennsylvania militia. Her great uncles, George B. Porter, who was governor of Michigan, James Madison Porter, secretary of the navy under President Tyler, and David R. Porter, governor of Pennsylvania, were men of ability and distinction. Her mother, Anne Eliza Parker, was a cousin of her father, Robert S. Todd. The latter had served in both houses of the Kentucky Legislature, and for over tw
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 3: battle of Manassas, or Bull Run. (search)
and 79th N. Y., 2d Wis., Batt. E, 3d U. S. Art.; Fourth Brigade, Col. I. B. Richardson, 1st Mass., 12th N. Y., 2d and 3d Mich., Batt. G, 1st U. S. Art., Batt. M, 2d U. S. Art. Second division, (1) Col. David Hunter (wounded); (2) Col. Andrew Porter:--First Brigade, Col. Andrew Porter, 8th (militia), 14th, and 27th N. Y., Battn. U. S. Inf., Battn. U. S. Marines, Battn. U. S. Cav., Batt. D, 5th U. S. Art.; Second Brigade, Col. A. E. Burnside, 2d N. H., 1st and 2d R. I., 71st N. Y. Third Col. Andrew Porter, 8th (militia), 14th, and 27th N. Y., Battn. U. S. Inf., Battn. U. S. Marines, Battn. U. S. Cav., Batt. D, 5th U. S. Art.; Second Brigade, Col. A. E. Burnside, 2d N. H., 1st and 2d R. I., 71st N. Y. Third division, Col. S. P. Heintzelman (wounded) :--First Brigade, Col. W. B. Franklin, 5th and 11th Mass., 1st Minn., Batt. I, 1st U. S. Art.; Second Brigade, Col. O. B. Wilcox (wounded and captured), 11th N. Y. (Fire Zouaves), 38th N. Y., 1st and 4th Mich., Batt. D, 2d U. S. Art.; Third Brigade, Col. O. O. Howard, 3d, 4th, and 5th Me., 2d Vt. Fourth (reserve) division, Not engaged. Brig.-Gen. Theodore Runyon, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th N. J. (three months), 1st, 2d, and 3d N. J., 41st N. Y. (three ye
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 15: Bull Run. (search)
his Rhode Island battery, and Sykes' battalion of regulars was sent to strengthen his left. By this time Hunter had sent Porter's brigade into the fields to the right of the Sudley road, where Griffin's battery could engage the rebel field-pieces; H the very beginning of the action, compelling his retirement from the front, and devolving the command of his division on Porter. McDowell, who came upon the field by way of Sudley Ford as the battle began, had already sent back word to Tyler to advancing on the left toward the Robinson hill. Sherman was moving diagonally across the centre of the morning's field. Porter's still aggressive brigade was pushing down the Sudley road. The compact brigades of Franklin and Willcox were coming t Howard's brigade, held back as a reserve, was not yet at hand. McDowell's effective force consisted of the brigades of Porter, Franklin, Willcox, and Sherman, a total of fourteen regiments, but several of which were already seriously demoralized;
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 16: the retreat. (search)
began moving from the field. The commander yielded to necessity, made the best dispositions he could to cover the retreat, and passed the word to reassemble in the old camps at Centreville, not doubting that he could there make a rally. The way thither by the Warrenton turnpike was open and straight; the distance four and a half miles. But, through the perversity of fate, each detachment now retreated by the same road over which it had come. Thus the bulk of the army — the brigades of Porter, Burnside, Franklin, Willcox, and Howard-went back over the long detour of ten miles round by Sudley Ford; these had with them, as yet, two batteries — a total of ten field-pieces; for only the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin were lost in the main battle. Sherman's brigade, on the other hand, marched eastward, over the ground of the morning's conflict, and recrossed Bull Run at the ford, half a mile above the stone bridge, by which they had approached. Keyes' brigade, becoming aware of
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