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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
three trustees, who were all living as late as 1836, and joined in making deeds to the lands on the reserve. On the same day that the trust deed was made, articles of association were signed by the proprietors, providing for the government of the company. The management of its affairs was intrusted to seven directors. They determined to extinguish the Indian title, and survey their land into townships 5 miles square. Moses Cleaveland, one of the directors, was made general agent; Augustus Porter, principal surveyor; and Seth Pease, astronomer and surveyor. To these were added four assistant surveyors, a commissary, a physician, and thirty-seven other employees. This party assembled at Schenectady, N. Y., in the spring of 1796, and prepared for their expedition. It is interesting to follow them on their way to the Reserve. They ascended the Mohawk River in bateaux, passing through Little Falls, and from the present city of Rome took their boats and stores across into Wood
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand Gulf, battle at. (search)
Grand Gulf, battle at. On the morning of April 29, 1863, Admiral Porter, with his gun and mortar boats, attacked the Confederate batteries at Grand Gulf, on the Mississippi, and after a contest of five hours and a half the lower batteries were silenced. The upper ones were too high to be much affected. The Confederates had field-batteries which were moved Attack of the gunboats on Grand Gulf. from point to point, and sharp-shooters filled rifle-pits on the high sides. Grant, becoming . from point to point, and sharp-shooters filled rifle-pits on the high sides. Grant, becoming convinced that Porter could not take the batteries, ordered him to run by them with gunboats and transports, as he had done at Vicksburg and Warrenton, while the army (on the west side of the river) should move down to Rodney, below, where it might cross without much opposition. At six o'clock in the evening, under cover of a heavy fire from the fleet, all the transports passed by in good condition.