Your search returned 39 results in 19 document sections:

1 2
Daniel Butterfield Brigadier GeneralMarch 13, 1862, to May 18, 1862. 3d Brigade, 1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 18, 1862, to Aug. 30, 1862. 3d Brigade, 1st Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralNov. 1, 1862, to Nov. 16, 1862. 1st Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralNov. 16, 1862, to Dec. 25, 1862. Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralOct. 3, 1861, to March 13, 1862. 3d Brigade, Porter's Division, Army of the Potomac Col. 12th New York InfantryTo July 29, 1861. 8th Brigade, 3d Division, Department of Pennsylv
J. H. Martindale Brigadier GeneralFeb. 2, 1863, to Sept. 16, 1863. District of Washington., Twenty-Second Army Corps, Department of Washington Brigadier GeneralJuly 10, 1864, to July 21, 1864. Eighteenth Army Corps, Department of Virginia and North Carolina Brigadier GeneralJuly 10, 1864, to July 21, 1864. Eighteenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralMarch 13, 1862, to May 18, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 18, 1862, to July 10, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 20, 1864, to July 10, 1864. 2d Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralOct. 1, 1863, to May 2, 1864. District of Washington., Twenty-Second Army Corps, Department of Washington Brigadier GeneralOct. 3, 1861. to March 13, 1862. 2d Brigade, Porter's Division, Army of the P
George W. Morrell Brigadier GeneralMarch 13, 1862, to May 18, 1862. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 18, 1862, to Oct. 30, 1862. 1st Division, Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralOct. 3, 1861, to March 13, 1862. 1st Brigade, Porter's Division, Army of the Potoma
B. Porter Col. 40th Mass. InfantryMarch 31, 1863, to Apr. 17, 1863. 2d Brigade, Abercrombie's Division, Twenty-Second Army Corps, Department of Washington
Burr Porter Col. 40th Mass. InfantryApr. 17, 1863, to May 4, 1863. Porter's Brigade, Gurney's Division, Seventh Army Corps, Department of Virginia Col. 40th Mass. InfantryMay 4, 1863, to July 15, 1863. 2d Brigade, 2d Division, Fourth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Burr Porter Col. 40th Mass. InfantryApr. 17, 1863, to May 4, 1863. Porter's Brigade, Gurney's Division, Seventh Army Corps, Department of Virginia Col. 40th Mass. InfantryMay 4, 1863, to July 15, 1863. 2d Brigade, 2d Division, Fourth Army Corps, Army of the Potom
s been in service as captain in our Second, until he reached this lieutenant-colonelcy. Colonel Maggi was not promoted; and he resigned the colonelcy of the Thirty-third Regiment April 1, 1863, and was not again in service. Sixth, Colonel Burr Porter, of our Fortieth. He is a splendid soldier. I appointed him, as I have several others,—though not from Massachusetts,—because so able. He is recommended, I learn, by Governor Olden, with the understanding that he be changed to New Jersend, with his regiment, be sent to Texas. He would make a great fighting brigadier. He is magnetic, like Maggi. He was educated at a French military academy; was on Omar Pasha's staff in the Crimea, and served under Fremont in Virginia. Colonel Porter was not appointed brigadier, and resigned as colonel of the Fortieth, July 21, 1863. He was afterwards appointed major in the First Battalion Frontier Cavalry, Jan. 1, 1865, and colonel Third Cavalry March 21, 1865, and discharged at expirat
stationed at Baton Rouge, La. March 13, 1863.—The regiment made a reconnoissance in the direction of Port Hudson, marching up under the guns of the rebel fortifications, a mile and a half in advance of other regiments, in a manner satisfactory to the brigade and division commanders. Having marched with Grover's division to Brashear City, it landed at Indian Bend, on Grand Lake, on the 13th of April; the advance meeting and driving before it a small force of the enemy. Encamped on Madam Porter's plantation. On the 15th, it started in pursuit of the enemy, marching to New Iberia in two days. From the 26th of April to the 21st of May, the regiment was employed at Barre's Landing in collecting and guarding corn, cotton, sugar, and molasses, guarding negroes, and loading and unloading boats at the landing. On the 19th of May, having been rejoined by the four companies left on provost duty at New Iberia, it commenced a return march to Brashear City, forming a portion of an
during the year just ended, on almost every field, and in every department of the army, where our flag has been unfurled,—at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Fort Wagner; at Chickamauga, Knoxville, and Chattanooga; under Hooker, Meade, Banks, Gilmore, Rosecrans, Burnside, and Grant. In every scene of danger and of duty,—along the Atlantic and the Gulf; on the Tennessee, the Cumberland, the Mississippi, and the Rio Grande; under Dupont, Dahlgren, Foote, Farragut, and Porter,—the sons of Massachusetts have borne their part, and paid the debt of patriotism and valor. Ubiquitous as the stock they descend from, national in their opinions and universal in their sympathies, they have fought shoulder to shoulder with men of all sections, and of every extraction. On the ocean, on the rivers, on the land, on the heights where they thundered down from the clouds of Lookout Mountain the defiance of the skies, they have graven with their swords a record imperishable. <
that the death of Mr. Everett was properly noticed, not only by the Executive and the Legislature, but by the various literary, scientific, and historical associations, and by the people throughout the Commonwealth. In the month of December, 1864, a battalion of cavalry was raised, intended for service on the frontier line of New York and Vermont, as a raid was expected from rebels gathered in the Canadas. The battalion was completed and mustered in on the 2d of January, 1865; and Colonel Burr Porter, formerly in command of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry, was appointed major. Two battalions were raised in the State of New York, to which the Massachusetts battalion was attached; and the three battalions were known as and designated the Twenty-sixth Regiment, New-York Volunteer Cavalry. They were mustered in for one year's service. So eager were our young men to join this command, that a surplus of upwards of three hundred men were left in camp at Readville, after the battalion
Third regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. (1) Col. Thomas Edward Chickering, Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. Vols. (2) Col. Lorenzo Dow Sargent. (3) Col. Burr Porter. companies. Field and staff.LineABCDEFGHIKLL One year's service.MM One year's service.Read's Co.Recruits.Totals. Number on regimental rolls,— Officers,2276––––––––––––––––98 Men, Including non-commissioned staff.26–2002011792129890859211010515798115881151192,090 Totals,––––––––––––––––––2,188 Enlisted men (included above) commissioned in regiment. Including non-commissioned staff.7–2315412–315–3–2–39 Enlisted men (included above) serving elsewhere within regiment.––22–4–1––11––2–––13 Totals,7–4519422–425–5–2–52 Actual total of members of regiment,— Officers,2276––––––––––––––––98 Men, Including non-commissioned staff.19–1961961782039488839210610315298110
1 2