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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 97 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 26 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
was not a man of affluence, and had a large family to support. In 1807 Captain David Porter, United States Navy, was appointed to the command of the New Orleans station. His father, David Porter, senior (who had been appointed by General Washington a sailing-master in the navy, for services performed during the Revolution), acchim to his house near by, and treated him with the most assiduous attention. Mr. Porter died at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Farragut, it being considered dangerous to move him. Captain Porter then, in order to show his gratitude to the Farraguts for their kindness to his father, offered to adopt their son Glasgow. This offer was gladly accepted, and from that time young Farragut became a member of Captain Porter's family, and was recognized as his adoptive son. The boy was placed at schoolr, 1810, he was appointed an acting midshipman in the navy. He accompanied Captain Porter in the cruise of the Essex around Cape Horn, and was with him at the memora
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
about sixty pounds of steam. In its passage it took off a portion of the head of Lieutenant S. B. Brittain, Jr., one of Porter's aids. He was a son of the Rev. S. B. Brittain, of New York, and a very promising youth, not quite seventeen years of age. He was standing very near Commander Porter at the time, with one hand on that officer's shoulder, and the other on his own cutlass. Captain Porter was badly scalded by the steam that escaped, but recovered. That officer was a son of Commodore David Porter, famous in American annals as the commander of the Essex in the war of 1812; and he inherited his father's bravery and patriotism. The gun-boat placed under his command was named Essex, in honor of his father's memory. It was all over before the land troops arrived, and neither those on the Fort Henry side of the river, nor they who moved against Fort Hieman, on the other bank of the stream, had an opportunity to fight. The occupants of the latter had fled at the approach of the Na
e, Mound City; Acting Volunteer Lieutenant John Pearce, Fort Hindman; Acting Master H. H. Gorringe, Cricket; Acting Master J. S. Watson, Juliet; Acting Master Charles Thatcher, Gazelle — should stand prominent, having zealously performed every thing required of them, with an ability deserving of the highest praise. I deem it necessary to send to you a bearer of despatches, who will explain to you fully the condition of the fleet. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Perilous situation of the fleet. flag-ship Cricket, Mississippi Squadron, below Grand Ecore, La., April 28, 1864. sir: In my last communication I informed you of the sinking of the Eastport by a torpedo about eight miles below Grand Ecore. The moment I heard of it, I went down to Alexandria, and sent a despatch-vessel for our two steam pump-boats; one was coming over the falls as I passed down, and t
yet unhurt when the first hour had passed. Then a 24-pound shot struck the Essex, crashed through her side and penetrated her boiler, instantly killing both her pilots and flooding the vessel from stem to stern with scalding steam. The Essex, wholly disabled, drifted The Unlucky Essex after Fort Henry Commander W. D. Porter The thousand-ton ironclad Essex received the severest punishment at Fort Henry. Fighting blood surged in the veins of Commander W. D. Porter, son of Admiral David Porter and brother of Admiral David D. Porter. The gunboat which he led into action at Fort Henry was named after the famous Essex which his father commanded in the War of 1812. Fifteen of the shots from Fort Henry struck and told upon the Essex, the last one penetrating her armor and piercing her middle boiler. Commander Porter, standing among his men directing the fight, was terrible scalded by the escaping steam, as were twenty-seven others. Wrongly suspected of disloyalty at the outbr
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
come down to him unto the third generation. He was the younger son of Commodore David Porter, who won fame in the Constellation and Essex. His grandfather had servin the war for independence. Yet with such a lineage of the free and open sea, Porter, like Farragut, proved that he could adapt himself to the cramped arenas of bay was fearful she would be captured. They kept up a tremendous fire on him; but Porter diverted their fire with a heavy cannonade. They let the chain go, but the mand not sleep until he got back to the ship. Clearing the way — deck on one of Porter's mortar schooners Twenty of these vessels accompanied Farragut's expedition the day. Toward five o'clock flames were seen curling up in Fort Jackson. Commander Porter, who pulled up the river in a rowboat, ascertained that the Fort itself waat knocked her into deeper water. A few minutes later, all on fire, she passed Porter's mortar vessels, and blew up with a faint explosion. When the larger vessel
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
uth of the Cape Fear River. The Raleigh trained her ten guns on the little vessels for nine hours. But they replied with vigor, and finally Flag-Officer W. F. Lynch, C. S. N., under whose direction the Raleigh had been built, judged it best to retire, since she was hardly in a state of completion to warrant coming to close quarters. To the Kansas belongs the honor of capturing the famous blockade-runner Tristram Shandy, May 15, 1864. The Tristram Shandy afterward became despatch vessel to Porter's fleet. her heavy armor and big guns, was pounded into submission by the monitors Weehawken and Nahant, and surrendered after a stubborn defense. The many attempts to gain possession of Charleston Harbor, that were animated as much by sentimental reasons as they were dictated by military necessity, were crowned by at least one success. Part of Morris Island was evacuated by the Confederates on September 7th. The enfilading and breaching batteries in the swamps, together with the comb
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
ur are typical faces of the best that service in the inland navy could produce. The firm features of these men tell of a simple heroism that so often rose to great heights in the battles of the gunboats. These men fought under Bill (Com. W. D.) Porter, elder brother of the admiral, in a ship named after the famous flagship of their father, Commodore David Porter, in the War of 1812. In that old namesake Farragut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of Commodore David Porter, in the War of 1812. In that old namesake Farragut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of the spirit of the navy of former days. Aboard of her too there was abundant opportunity to exemplify that spirit as nobly as was ever done by sailors any-where. From Fort Henry till the fall of Port Hudson the Essex was always in the thick of the fight. One of the Essex's most important services came in the action of July 15, 1862. On Aug. 7 the Arkansas and two gunboats were lying above Baton Rouge ready to cooperate with the Confederate troops in a combined attack on that place. The troop
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Essex, the, (search)
799. On June 26, 1812, under command of Capt. David Porter, she left Sandy Hook, N. J., on a cruisepened fire with three cheers from her people. Porter caused his ports to be knocked out in an instanstitution and Hornet, orders were sent to Captain Porter, of the Essex, then lying in the Delaware,funds by taking $55,000 from a British packet, Porter made sail for the Pacific Ocean around Cape Ho one or two consorts, to attempt her capture. Porter heard of this from an officer who was sent intmericans. In consequence of this information, Porter resolved to go to the Marquesas Islands, refit. Among the Marquesas Islands (at Nooaheevah) Porter became involved in hostilities with the warrinays before he weighed anchor. The girls, says Porter in his Journal, lined the beach from morning uen short sixes. The British vessels blockaded Porter's ships. At length he determined to escape. ssex Junior, which was made a cartel-ship, and Porter was honored as the hero of the Pacific. Munic[2 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, David 1780- (search)
Porter, David 1780- Naval officer; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1780; was appointed a midshi where he was wounded. In October, 1803, David Porter. he was captured in the Philadelphia when s against the American vessels in that region. Porter's appearance with a strong frigate was very opof them armed, and bearing letters-of-marque. Porter cruised among the islands for nearly a fortnigailed from the Delaware in the solitary Essex, Porter found himself in command of a squadron of ninehipman John Maury, of the navy. They informed Porter that a war was raging on the island between na In an interview with the king of the Taeehs, Porter agreed to assist him in his wars. With muskets and a cannon, Porter's men drove the enemies of the king from hill to hill, until they made a stan States. One tribe had remained hostile. This Porter subdued. On Dec. 12 he started for home in thror on the Pacific Ocean became a prisoner. Porter was one of the naval commissioners from 1815 t[4 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, David Dixon 1813-1891 (search)
Porter, David Dixon 1813-1891 Naval officer; born in Chester, Pa., June 8, 1813; a son of David Porter; entered the navy as midshipman, Feb. 2, 1829. He was attached to the coast survey from 1836 to 1840. Then he cruised in Brazilian waters, and served in the Naval Observatory at Washington for a while. He engaged in the war against Mexico on land and on water, and in 1861 joined the Gulf Squadron, in command of the Powhatan. He was in the expedition up the Mississippi against New Orleans in 1862, in command of twenty-one mortar-boats and several steamers. Porter did important service on the Mississippi and Red rivers in 1863-64, and was conspicuous in the siege of Vicksburg. For the latter service he was promoted rear-admiral, July 4, 1863. In 1864 he was in command of the North Atlantic blockading squadron, and rendered efficient service in the capture of Fort Fisher in January, 1865. He was made vice-admiral in July, 1866; admiral, Oct. 17, 1870; and was superintenden
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