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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 47 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 4 0 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
th, 14; for command, 60. Pleasants, Henry, 195, 198. Plunder, demoralizing effect, 40; Hancock and, 288. Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, 193. Pontoon bridge, 130, 159. Po-Ny, 119. Pope, John, 60. Poplar Grove church, 234. Porter, David Dixon, 249. Porter, Georgia Ann (Patterson), 249. Porter, Horace, 142. Potter, Alonzo, 167. Potter, Robert Barnwell, 166, 212, 219, 234, 237, 296, 297, 334. Pourtales, Louis Auguste de, 212. Pratt, Mary, 26. Prisoners, provost, 13; RebePorter, Georgia Ann (Patterson), 249. Porter, Horace, 142. Potter, Alonzo, 167. Potter, Robert Barnwell, 166, 212, 219, 234, 237, 296, 297, 334. Pourtales, Louis Auguste de, 212. Pratt, Mary, 26. Prisoners, provost, 13; Rebel, 32, 45, 324, 836, 347. Punishments, 243. Raccoon Ford, 19, 68, 69. Races, horse, 321. Railroad construction, 311. Rapidan River, 51. Rawlins, John Aaron, 91n, 114n. Reams' station, 224, 234. Rebels, fighting qualities, 87, 99, 100, 208; privations, 132; valuable qualities, 186; wearing down, 245, 271; deserters, 305, 310; appearance, 324, 360. Revere, Paul Joseph, 34. Review of troops, 9, 316, 318; 2d corps, 75; 9th corps, 261. Rice, James Clay, 109, 180. Rice's st
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Preface (search)
nest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met in heroic struggle, should form a
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
a After capturing the great ironclad, the Confederates towed their prize over to the east bank of the Mississippi, where she sank, near Jefferson Davis' plantation. Two days later, as they were trying to raise her, they were frightened off by Porter's famous dummy monitor, made of pork-barrels and an old coal-barge, and the next day, although the harmless monitor was hard and fast aground, they destroyed the Indianola and abandoned her. The Indianola had two propellers in addition to her sidet's rams had been added to the fleet of the Federals in the engagement off Memphis, the Confederate fleet was put out of commission. This picture of the General Bragg was taken after she had been raised and refitted by the Federals and added to Porter's fleet on the Mississippi, where she served creditably till the war's close. sailing craft of various dimensions, classes, and armaments had been equipped, while many others were in the process of construction. Of those in commission, twenty-
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
commanding the frigate Niagara which had hastened home from Japanese waters, appeared off Charleston and gave notice to the foreign ships then in that port that the blockading laws would be rigidly enforced. On the 25th of May, he appeared off Pensacola, Florida, and the same day gave notice. Neutral vessels were boarded and warned off the coasts. The steam frigate Brooklyn, under Commander C. H. Poor, at the same time proclaimed the blockade at the mouth of the Mississippi, and Lieutenant D. D. Porter, in the Powhatan, did the same thing at the entrance to Mobile Bay. The menace had begun. By July, every port had been informed. Europe, especially England, was at first inclined to laugh at the attempt to close these profitable markets. It was indeed at the outset, in view of the bigness of the task, apparently ludicrous. Here was a coast three thousand five hundred and forty-nine miles long, containing almost two hundred places where anchors could be dropped and cargoes lan
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
in a little over three months his name was echoing not only through the country but round the world. It was Commander David D. Porter, in charge of the steamer Powhatan in the Gulf Blockading Squadron, who conceived the idea of running by the poattached to your squadron a fleet of bomb-vessels, and armed steamers enough to manage them, all under command of Commander D. D. Porter, who will be directed to report to you. As fast as these vessels are got ready, they will be sent to Key West to g to be done he intended to do his share of it, even with his Porter, whose bomb-vessels backed the fleet Admiral David Dixon Porter was born in 1813 and died in 1891. The red blood of the sea-fighter had come down to him unto the third generaon to Fort St. Philip. There his vessel and the Itasca became the center of such a terrific storm of shot that Commander David D. Porter, of the mortar-boat flotilla, signalled the two little vessels to retire. The Itasca had to be run ashore belo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
s along the river banks and building new batteries at Port Hudson. The light-draft gunboats, familiarly known as tin-clads, which had been equipped at the suggestion of Davis, began to join the fleet in the early autumn. Davis employed his vessels on some minor expeditions up the Yazoo and other rivers, but 1862 closed with a gloomy outlook for the Federals along the Mississippi. From February 1st to April 5, 1863, gunboats were busy on what are known as the bayou expeditions. Admiral David D. Porter had succeeded to the command of the Mississippi A critical moment in the red river expedition of April, 1864--Federal transports below the falls On the second Red river expedition, in 1864, Alexandria was garrisoned and made the base for the army and navy operating both above and below that point, in the effort that had for its ultimate object the recovery of Texas to the Union. The fleet under Admiral Porter started up the Red River from Vicksburg with the transports carryin
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
vances were The flagship Malvern In this vivid portrait group of Admiral Porter and his staff, taken in December, 1864, appear the men selected by him to ar K. R. Breese, another young officer scarcely less daring than Cushing and now Porter's flect-captain. Lieutenant-Commander Henry A. Adams, Jr., stands on Porter's Porter's right. A number of volunteer officers are in the group. Porter was ever quick to recognize the bravery of the volunteers and their value to the service. From the dPorter was ever quick to recognize the bravery of the volunteers and their value to the service. From the decks of the Malvern (shown below) were directed the final operations at sea of the North Atlantic squadron in the war. Fort Fisher by 1864 had become the most formidatler played an overweening part. After the second attack, January 13-15th, Admiral Porter, from the deck of the Malvern, witnessed the gallant onslaught of General Tof the garrison was received very soon afterward. Picked men in the navy — Porter and his staff, December, 1864 The flagship Malvern at Norfolk made and entre
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
t Morgan. July, 1862. July 1, 1862. Porter's mortar flotilla engaged the Confed. batteriter and Meade On the left sits Rear-Admiral David Dixon Porter, in conference with Major-Generalion against Fort Fisher were finally settled. Porter had been promised the necessary troops to cooptured, and 30 lost. April 16, 1863. Adml. Porter's fleet of 8 gunboats and several transport863. Bombardment of Grand Gulf, Miss., by Porter's fleet. Confed. works greatly damaged. Fleehe Confederates, and taken possession of by Adml. Porter. May 27, 1863. Sinking of the U. S.las at Hickman, Ky. April 12, 1864. Adml. Porter's Red River fleet attacked at Blair's Plant Confederates in strong force attacked 3 of Adml. Porter's gunboats on the Red River. May, 1864. rpedo in James River. May 13, 1864. Adml. Porter's fleet above Alexandria Falls released by tack on Fort Fisher, N. C., by the fleet of Adml. Porter. December 25, 1864. Attack on Fort [2 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Admiral, (search)
Admiral, Several times the title of the highest rank in the United States naval service. Prior to the Civil War the highest rank was that of commodore. In 1862 Congress established the rank of rear-admiral: in 1864 that of vice-admiral; and in 1866 that of admiral, in each case the office being bestowed on David G. Farragut. On the death of David D. Porter (1891), who by law had succeeded to the titles of vice-admiral and admiral, both these grades were abolished, and the grade of rear-admiral remained the highest till 1899, when that of admiral was again ereated by Congress and conferred on George Dewey. Further legislation by Congress in that year increased the number of rear-admirals from six, to which it bad been reduced in 1882, to eighteen, and divided these officers into two classes of nine each, the first nine corresponding in rank to major-generals in the army, and the second to brigadier-generals. The same act made the increase in the number of rear-admirals possib
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cushing, William Barker 1843-1874 (search)
courage during the war, the most notable of which was the destruction of the Confederate ram Albemarle (q. v.) at Plymouth, N. C. For this he received a vote of thanks from Congress. In 1868-69 he commanded (as lieutenant-commander) the steamer Maumee in the Asiatic squadron. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 17, 1874. Destruction of the Albemarle. The following handsome tribute to Cushing and detailed narrative of his famous William Barker Cushing. exploit were penned by Admiral David D. Porter, in a private letter under date of Nov. 21, 1888: I like to talk and write about Cushing. He was one of those brave spirits developed by the Civil War who always rose to the occasion. He was always ready to undertake any duty, no matter how desperate, and he generally succeeded in his enterprises, from the fact that the enemy supposed that no man would be foolhardy enough to embark in such hazardous affairs where there seemed so little chance of success. A very interesting v
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