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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 97 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 26 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for David Porter or search for David Porter in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the belief that I would here give him battle. This day my outpost, Greene's regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, skirmished heavily with him, and again on the 6th. On the 7th the enemy continued to advance slowly, my advance, under Captain Porter, of Burbridge's regiment; skirmishing with him the entire day. General Price now arrived with Dockery and Crawford's brigades and Woods's battalion, and took command. Cabell's brigade was taken from me and placed in Fagan's division. On the 8th the enemy again advanced, driving Captain Porter with my outpost to the northeast edge of the prairie. Greene's brigade was then relieved from outpost duty by troops of Fagan's division. On the evening of the 9th, the enemy having been reinforced by Thayer's division from Fort Smith, four thousand strong, cavalry, infantry and artillery, marched upon the outposts of our army under General Dockery, drove them in, and was preparing to flank General Shelby's camp when he evacuated it, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
the belief that I would here give him battle. This day my outpost, Greene's regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, skirmished heavily with him, and again on the 6th. On the 7th the enemy continued to advance slowly, my advance, under Captain Porter, of Burbridge's regiment; skirmishing with him the entire day. General Price now arrived with Dockery and Crawford's brigades and Woods's battalion, and took command. Cabell's brigade was taken from me and placed in Fagan's division. On the 8th the enemy again advanced, driving Captain Porter with my outpost to the northeast edge of the prairie. Greene's brigade was then relieved from outpost duty by troops of Fagan's division. On the evening of the 9th, the enemy having been reinforced by Thayer's division from Fort Smith, four thousand strong, cavalry, infantry and artillery, marched upon the outposts of our army under General Dockery, drove them in, and was preparing to flank General Shelby's camp when he evacuated it, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 48 (search)
n of what he individually sees or hears. In a siege, prolonged over considerable time, the mental impressions of the acts seen, are of those salient transactions distinctly important, or that have the elements of tragedy or of fun in them. One part of the fun was to stand by a member of the signal corps and let him tell you what they, the feds, were telegraphing by their flag signals. On Fort Hill we had a signal corps operator who was very skilled in reading the signal messages of Commodore Porter's fleet to General Grant's headquarters and vice versa; in fact, there seemed to be no difficulty in interpreting the intentions of the Federals at any of the signal stations. He reported that it was a part of Grant's plan to make a charge up the river road that ran between Fort Hill and the water batteries. So to make our outside friends comfortable and give them a warm reception, I had caused to be constructed three deep ditches across the road, the bottom of each chasm being armed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
into the ravines beyond, where a large number of prisoners were captured. For the details of this brilliant action, I refer you to the graphic report of Brigadier-General Preston. While this action was progressing, the Lieutenant-General commanding directed Stewart's division to advance, and to aid the combined attack, I ordered, by his authority, Williams's battalion of reserve artillery to be placed in position in front of Poe's house. This was done under the immediate direction of Major Porter, my chief of artillery. About this time the enemy were moving rein-forcements to sustain his right, which was staggering under the terrific assault of Preston. Williams, with eleven pieces of artillery, opened upon this re-inforcing column with destructive effect, dispersing it in every direction, and silencing his artillery. At the same time Stewart assaulted the enemy's works, and captured a number of prisoners, who dared not cross the stream of fire which Williams poured across thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
th a loftier pride than the Roman Citizen, I am a Virginian. And I will briefly sketch to my younger hearers the career of him whose name your Encampment bears: Matthew Fontaine Maury was born in Spotsylvania county, January 14, 1806. In 1811 his father moved with his family and slaves to a cotton plantation near Franklin, Tennessee. In 1824, Captain John Minor Maury, the oldest son, died while serving against the pirates as Flag Captain of the West India Squadron, (under old Commodore David Porter,) and next year young Matthew was appointed midshipman. His father opposed so strongly his entry into the Navy, that supplied with money by a friend, and by the overseer with a horse, young Matthew rode away from his father's home without his father's blessing, through that great wilderness that lay between him and the career for which his spirit yearned. If ever an unfilial act was justified by the event, this was. He was warmly greeted on reaching Fredericksburg by his uncle, Gen