hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 346 18 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 90 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 67 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 62 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fitz John Porter or search for Fitz John Porter in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ominy at New bridge. The Federal right, under Fitz John Porter, was well and strongly posted behind Beaver Daearly morning of the 27th, made the position of General Porter behind Beaver Dam untenable, and he promptly reng going on overhead. General Lee thus describes Porter's position, at which the battle of Gaines' Mill, ore. Under cover of night, following the 27th, General Porter made good his retreat by the bridges he had buie timely arrival of two brigades, coming up just as Porter's line was carried, covered his retreat and successarms gathered from the fields and the short line of Porter's retreat to the river. McClellan's rear guard, y artillery and defended by a fleet of gunboats and Porter's and Keyes' corps. In carrying out Lee's plan, in reserve. To Magruder was assigned the attack on Porter's position—the strongest on Malvern hill—supported und of battle and moving really immediately against Porter's front, his artillery sweeping the open and the wo
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
Evans and Jenkins were composed of South Carolina troops; the Fifteenth South Carolina was in Drayton's brigade, with D. R. Jones on the right, and the Hampton legion infantry was in Wofford's brigade, with Hood on the left. Bachman's and Garden's batteries were in Major Frobel's battalion, and Rhett's was in S. D. Lee's battalion. Pope massed against Jackson, and after assailing him with a heavy fire of artillery, attacked his whole line with all the aggressive power he could command. Porter's corps assailed his right and center, and Heintzelman's and Reno's corps attacked his left and left flank. These three corps were supported by the divisions of King and Ricketts. Jackson stood against this combination with his three divisions, and made desperate resistance. For three hours, from 1 to 4 p. m., his battle was purely defensive and held back the surging columns of attack, but he saw that his limit of resistance had been reached and sent to General Lee for a division. At t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ry severe wound. Captain Boyce mentions all his officers, Lieutenants Jeter, Porter, Scaife and Monro, and Sergeants Glenn, Humphreys, Bunch, and Young, and Corpore river into Virginia without loss at night. On the evening of the 19th, General Porter with the Federal Fifth corps was at the Shepherdstown ford, with his artills artillery. Early on the 20th, A. P. Hill was sent with his division to drive Porter's force back and hold the crossing. In executing this command General Hill fought the battle of Shepherdstown. General Porter in his report represents the attack of General Hill to have been made upon two of his brigades, and a part of a thiat Hill's division met the Pennsylvania regiment alone in actual battle, and as Porter says that this regiment became confused early in the action, and their arms werillery fire as both sides report was poured upon it. At close quarters with General Porter's troops, Hill ordered the final charge, and the brigades of the Fifth corp
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
and outlying pickets until detailed for special duty along the Yazoo delta, opposing with cavalry and artillery the advance of the Federal transports. During Grant's preliminary movements against Vicksburg he thwarted the attempt of Sherman and Porter to reach the city in the rear by way of Deer creek. In 1863 he was promoted to brigadier-general. He was active in command of cavalry in harassing Sherman's movement to Chattanooga, and during the Georgia campaign of 1864 his brigade of Alabami. In the Second Manassas campaign he commanded a division of Longstreet's corps, Drayton's brigade having been added to the two previously mentioned. He drove the enemy through Thoroughfare Gap, held the extreme right next day, confronting Fitz John Porter, and in the battle of the 30th actively engaged the Federal left. In the Maryland campaign his division, increased by the addition of Kemper's and Garnett's Virginia brigades and Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, had a conspicuous part, winn
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
s in many of the naval fights. Being one of the officers and crew placed on the prize ship Providence, he was captured by a British man-of-war and taken to Dartmoor prison in England, and there remained until the end of the war. He was with Commodore Porter as midshipman, in the anti-piratical squadron, and when the Bolivian war of independence took place he served under General Bolivar and was badly wounded in one of the engagements of that war. He took part in every war (Indian or others) of le, and reaching Virginia after the Seven Days campaign, was in the engagement at Grave Yard hill, and the Maryland campaign. At Second Manassas the Macbeth artillery by its rapid and accurate firing did more than any other command to break Fitz John Porter's division, marching in three solid columns against Jackson's battle-worn and battle-thinned command. At the battle of Sharpsburg the company for a time unsupported held their ground with a valor that elicited much commendation. In this ac