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dward, bap. 9 Oct. 1794, being the seventh Edward in a direct line of descent. Edward the f. resided here, and d. of putrid fever 9 Jan. 1794, a. 29; his w. Lucy survived. 35. Moses, parentage not ascertained, by w. Lucy, had Moses, b. 1760, d. before 29 Ap. 1754. Moses the f. was of Lexington, and d. about 1773; his w. Lucy m. Benjamin Wheeler of Concord 27 Nov. 1753. 36. Thaddeus. parentage not ascertained, m. Eunice Munroe of Lex. 11 May 1781, and had Eunice, b. about 1782, m. Joseph Porter 24 Jan. 1799, and d. 7 Nov. 1836. Thaddeus the f. prob. d. about 1784, in which year a guardian was appointed for his daughter; his w. Eunice m. Ebenezer Stedman about 1785, and was buried 6 Sept. 1846, a. 87. Winter, John, by w. Hannah, had Hannah, b. 10 Ap. 1665; John, b. 17 Sept. 1667; Thomas, b. 25 June 1669; Joseph, b. 2 Mar. 1671-2; Mary, b. 6 Feb. 1675; Elizabeth, b. 20 Aug. 1678; Abigail, b. 12 Mar. 1680; Samuel, b. 12 Mar. 1684-5. John the f. res. at the Farms, and d. 18
dward, bap. 9 Oct. 1794, being the seventh Edward in a direct line of descent. Edward the f. resided here, and d. of putrid fever 9 Jan. 1794, a. 29; his w. Lucy survived. 35. Moses, parentage not ascertained, by w. Lucy, had Moses, b. 1760, d. before 29 Ap. 1754. Moses the f. was of Lexington, and d. about 1773; his w. Lucy m. Benjamin Wheeler of Concord 27 Nov. 1753. 36. Thaddeus. parentage not ascertained, m. Eunice Munroe of Lex. 11 May 1781, and had Eunice, b. about 1782, m. Joseph Porter 24 Jan. 1799, and d. 7 Nov. 1836. Thaddeus the f. prob. d. about 1784, in which year a guardian was appointed for his daughter; his w. Eunice m. Ebenezer Stedman about 1785, and was buried 6 Sept. 1846, a. 87. Winter, John, by w. Hannah, had Hannah, b. 10 Ap. 1665; John, b. 17 Sept. 1667; Thomas, b. 25 June 1669; Joseph, b. 2 Mar. 1671-2; Mary, b. 6 Feb. 1675; Elizabeth, b. 20 Aug. 1678; Abigail, b. 12 Mar. 1680; Samuel, b. 12 Mar. 1684-5. John the f. res. at the Farms, and d. 18
eirce, 44, 68, 208, 365, 433. Pelham, 53, 6, 89, 119, 74, 226, 54. Pemberton, 126, 287. Perkins, 186, 204-6 327. Perry, 325, 7. Pervear. 314, 24. Peters, 43, 5. Pettingell, 328. Phillips, 117, 207, 255-7. Phinney, 423. Phipps, 211, 26. Phips, 112-15, 27, 30, 3, 53, 7, 68-70, 5, 6, 307, 10, 53, 4, 403, 7. Piambow, 391. Pickering, 321. Pickman, 310. Pigeon, 308. Pittimee, 391. Plympton, 168, 204, 435, 8. Pomeroy, 310. Poole, 8, 32, 116. Porter, 231, 6. 88. Post, 33. Powers, 319. Pratt, 20, 4, 6, 7, 32, 5, 76, 233. Prentice. or Prentiss, 4, 59, 76, 80, 1, 92, 4, 118, 214, 88, 92, 305, 92. 4, 400, 31. Prescott, 185, 288, 423. Price, 2 87. Prince, 33, 247. Prout, 272. Prudden, 49, 50. Pryor, 331. Putnam, 187, 423, 4, 6. Pynchon, 6, 8, 27, 398. Quincy, 42, 275, 82, 304, 65. Randolph, 76, 7, 95, 6, 103– 8. Ravenscroft, 110. Rawson, 99, 350, 1, 89, 98. Ray, 321. Raymond, 342.
s. Manning. Chadwick, 506. Burgess. Oldham. Porter. Welch. Chamberlin, 506. Butterfield. Hammond. Johnson. Lamson. Milledge. Mullett. Perry. Porter. Prentice. Quick. Read. Remington. Russell. Dana. Fessenden. Frost. Miller. Parker. Porter. Wigglesworth. Cooper, 516, 17. Andrew. Beals Kidder. Mayhew. Miles. Mitchell. Periman. Porter. Rand. Richardson. Robbins. Russell. Sweetse. Marrett. Mason. Mead. Parker. Peirce. Porter. Prentice. Robbins. Rugg. Russell. Sandersover. Pemberton. Pepperell. Perkins. Pierce. Porter. Sewall. Thwing. Turner. Wellington. Whitin Moore. Palmer. Parker. Phelps. Plympton. Porter. Prentice. Richardson. Shepard. Stearns. Th Munroe. Muzzey. Peirce. Phillips. Piper. Porter. Poulter. Powers. Prentice. Raymond. Rayner
orth by Mystic river, south and southwest by J. Dickson, and east by James Tufts and C. Crosswell. It was situated, as will be thus seen, at the bend of the river and at the end of the old rangeway, now North street. In the division of the estate, nineteen and three-quarters acres fell to the son William, which he seems to have improved by fencing, building a barn and planting an orchard. Relative to this, we reproduce portions of his diary above alluded to: 1738.Apr. 7 bought of Joseph Porter one hundred and a half of Rails 2/5 P C. £3.7.6 Bought 130 Posts of Charls £5.5.0 Bought of Deacon Waterman 40 Rails £ 1.10.6. Bought of Ebenezer Porter 100 Rails Paid Mr. Willis for Boating up—Rails and posts £ 1. Bought of Mr. Austin a Jack 3.10. 1739January 2. Went to Charlestown Re[turne]d 10 8 1 p[reache]d at Charlestown all day Paid David an Indian the sum of £ 5. for stone wall April 15 I p[reache]d April 13 and 16 grafted in my Orchard and in the Parson- age land abt
Arrests in Portsmouth. We learn by recent arrivals from Portsmouth that the Yankees are drawing the reign of tyranny more tightly over the inhabitants. Messrs. J. Guslavus Holladay, (member of the Virginia Convention) Joseph Porter, and George Neville have been arrested and confined in prison.
--A special dispatch to the Tribune, date Grenade, 13th instant, says the St. Louis Republican, of the 7th instant, says that the guerrillas continue their vigorous warfare in Missouri. They seem to be crossing to the north side of the Missouri river. On the 4th instant, they attacked and dispersed a body of Federal troops at Taylorsville. Colonel Poindexter is reported near Hudson, with 1,200 partisans, threatening to capture that place. A dispatch from Shelban, reports Porter, with 2,400 men, encamped near Newark. He had bagged two companies of militia there, after slight resistance, with a large number of horses, guns, and a considerable amount of ammunition. Up to the 8th instant, 22,000 men were enrolled in the State of New York. Important army movements are anticipated at Washington. No one is allowed to pass McClellan's lines. A large number of negroes have been stolen by Pope, near Stenardsville, Va. The New York Commercial states that