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A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 99 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
gade, Col. Joseph J. Bartlett; 5th Me., Col. Nathaniel J. Jackson; 16th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Joel J. Seaver; 27th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alexander D. Adams; 96th Pa., Col. Henry L. Cake. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Newton; 18th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. George R. Myers; 31st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Francis E. Pinto; 32d N. Y., Col. Roderick Matheson; Maj. George F. Lemon; 95th Pa., Col. Gustavus W. Town. Artillery, Capt. Emory Upton; Md. Light, Batt. A, Capt. John W. Wolcott; Mass. Light, Batt. A, Capt. Josiah Porter; N. J. Light, Batt. A, Capt. William Hexamer; 2d U. S., Batt. D, Lieut. Edward B. Williston. Second Division, Maj.-Gen. William F. Smith:--First Brigade, (1) Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, Assigned to First Division, Second Army Corps, September 17. (2) Col. Amasa Cobb; 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Maj. John Wilson; 49th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William Brisbane; 137th Pa., Col. Henry M. Bossert; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks; 2d Vt., M
small. The railroad companies have already issued orders in furtherance of the object of this proclamation, and no violation of them will be permitted. At St. Louis, Mo., a report of the removal of Major-General Fremont created intense indignation among the mass of Unionists, and great rejoicing among the secessionists. The recruiting rendezvous for an Irish regiment was closed on receipt of the news, and a meeting for the formation of a Home Guard adjourned without action.--N. Y. Herald, October 5. The First Massachusetts Light Battery, reorganized since its return from the three months service, left Boston this afternoon for the war, under the command of Captain Josiah Porter. General Reynolds with a body of Indiana and Ohio troops made a reconnoissance from his position at Cheat Mountain, and met a rebel force under General Lee at Greenbriar, Va., dispersing them after a severe fight of over an hour. The Union loss was eight killed and thirty wounded.--(Doc. 67.)
Prospect Hill. The other part of the division took the new artillery road, and occupied Smoots' and Maxwell's hills, a mile and a half east of Lewinsville. The batteries were drawn up in prominent positions, and the infantry placed in situations to support them. After remaining about three hours waiting in vain for the rebels to make an attack — in fact, inviting them to it — the skirmishers advanced and occupied Lewinsville, the rebels retreating. A portion of the troops under Brigadier-General Porter also advanced and occupied Miner's Hill, to the right of Fall's Church, and commanding that village and Barrel's Hill, which latter was in possession of rebel pickets. General McClellan and staff, accompanied by Captain Barker's McClellan Dragoons, crossed Chain Bridge early this morning, spending the whole day in reconnoissance from the new positions taken by the Federal troops. The ship John Clark, anchored in Lynn Haven Bay, having dragged her anchor in a storm to within a
had fired upon a steamer with United States stores a few days previously. Lieutenant-Colonel Toland, in command of the Zouaves, learned at Winfield that eight hundred rebels were encamped at Hurricane Bridge, fourteen miles from Winfield, and at once marched against them, but they abandoned their camp upon his approach and fled.--(Doc. 85.) The rebels advanced in large force in the direction of Lewinsville, Va., driving in the National pickets. The divisions of Generals McCall, Smith, Porter, and McDowell were promptly prepared for an apprehended emergency, but nothing further transpired beyond the firing of a few shots from the rebels, which fell short. About three rebel regiments showed themselves, and the expectation was that a general advance was imminent. Great excitement prevailed in Washington, and throughout the Federal lines. The Eighth regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, under the command of Col. Murphy, left Madison for St. Louis, Mo.--N. Y. World, October 14.
rnal and Democrat, and in a short time demolished every thing it contained. They then proceeded to several private houses, and served them in the same manner.--New York Times, October 22. This morning a heavy detachment from General Smith's division made a reconnoissance to Flint Hill, Va., which is about two miles and a half from Fairfax Court House, and from which there is a good view of the village. A strong picket was observed there, and indications that a large or reserve force was in the vicinity. The reconnoitring party consisted of portions of Mott's and Ayres' batteries, and companies from the Fifth (regular) and from Col. Friedman's regiment of cavalry. Generals McClellan, Porter, Smith, and Hancock accompanied the expedition.--National Intelligencer, October 21. The Sixth regiment of Vermont Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Nathaniel Lord, Jr., passed through Jersey City, N. J., en route for Washington. The regiment numbered one thousand and fifty men.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
J. Seaver; 27th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alexander D. Adams; 96th Pa., Col. Henry L. Cake. Brigade loss: k, 69; w, 409; mi, 68 == 546. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Newton: 18th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. George R. Myers, Maj. John C. Meginnis; 31st N. Y., Col. Calvin E. Pratt (w), Maj. Alexander Raszewski; 32d N. Y., Col. Roderick Matheson; 95th Pa., Col. John M. Gosline (in w), Lieut.-Col. Gustavus W. Town. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 279; in, 114==433. Artillery, Capt. Edward R. Platt: 1st Mass., Capt. Josiah Porter; 1st N. J., Capt. William Hexamer; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Emory Upton. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 13; m, 4==18. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock: 6th. Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Col. Francis L. Vinton; 49th Pa., Col. William H. Irwin; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: k, 9; w, 93; m, 98 == 200. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks (w): 2d Vt., Col. Henry Whiting; 3d Vt., Lieut.-Col. Wheelock G. Veazey; 4
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
., Col. Henry L. Cake. Brigade loss: Crampton's Pass, k, 50; w, 167 == 217. Antietam, k, 1; w, 8 == 9. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Newton: 18th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. George R. Myers; 31st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Francis E. Pinto; 32d N. Y., Col. Roderick Matheson (m w), Maj. George F. Lemon (m w); 95th Pa., Col. Gustavus W. Town. Brigade loss: Crampton's Pass, k, 24; w, 98; m, 2 == 124. Antietam, I, 1; w, 20 == 21. Artillery, Capt. Emory Upton: A, Md., Capt. John W. Wolcott; 1st Mass., Capt. Josiah Porter; 1st N. J., Capt. William Hexamer; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward B. Williston. Artillery loss; Antietam, k, 1; w, 13; nm, 2 == 16. Second division, Maj.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, Col. Amasa Cobb: 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Maj. John Wilson; 49th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William Brisbane; 137th Pa., Col. Henry M. Bossert; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: Antietam, w, 6. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H{. Brooks: 2d Vt., Maj.
used him, and ordered him to notify the company. The sergeant said he knew where every man lived, and they all wanted to go. Early in the forenoon, the company reported with full ranks. The Quartermaster-General succeeding in purchasing horses, and providing ammunition. The field and staff were Asa M. Cook, of Somerville, major; Frederick A. Heath, of Boston, adjutant; Thomas J. Foss, of Boston, quartermaster; John P. Ordway, of Boston, surgeon; F. Le Baron Monroe, assistant-surgeon; Josiah Porter, of North Cambridge; William H. McCartney, of Boston; C. C. E. Mortimer, of Boston; and Robert L. Sawin, of Boston, lieutenants. The company numbered one hundred and twenty men. The battery had six brass six-pounders. They took with them seventy horses, selected mainly from the stables of the Metropolitan Horse railroad Company, and ten tons of cartridges of shot and grape. They marched to the Worcester Railroad Depot, between one and two o'clock that afternoon, ready to start; but
issioned majors. The regiment was recruited at Camp Brigham, Readville, and left for the seat of war in detachments,—the first being sent forward Dec. 25; the second, Dec. 27; and the third, on Sunday, December 29, 1861. The regiment was ordered to Annapolis; and Colonel Williams was to await orders from the Adjutant-General of the United States. The regiment remained at Annapolis until the close of the year. The First Light Battery was recruited at Camp Cameron, Cambridge, by Captain Josiah Porter, assisted by William H. McCartney, Jacob H. Sleeper, Jacob Federhen, and Robert L. Sawin, of Boston, who were severally commissioned lieutenants. The battery left the State on the 3d of October, 1861, for Washington. The Second Battery was recruited at Camp Wollaston, Quincy, and left for Washington, on the eighth day of August, 1861. Its officers were Ormond F. Nims, Boston, captain; John W. Wolcott, Roxbury, first lieutenant; George G. Trull of Boston, Richard B. Hall of Bosto
iana. He was with Gen. Banks at Sabine. Cross Roads; in this battle Gen. Franklin was wounded, and had two horses shot under him. It was he who conducted the retreat to Alexandria, and directed Col. Bailey to make arrangements for the relief of Porter's fleet by the Red River dam. Through the summer of 1864, on account of his wound, he was absent on sick leave. During this period Gen. Grant urged the appointment of Gen. Franklin to the command of the middle military division. The general, whrs, and during the winter of 1861, commanded the first brigade of Franklin's division. In May, 1862, upon the formation of the Sixth Corps, he succeeded to the command of the First Division. June 27, his division was sent at a critical moment to Porter's relief at Gaines' Mill, and rendered important service. At Fraser's Farm, June 30, the record made by his division is historic; at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862, it held the right of the main line. He was commissioned major general of volunteer
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