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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. B. Porter or search for A. B. Porter in all documents.

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drews, First Missouri; Lieut.-Col. Merritt, First Iowa; Major Porter, First Iowa; Capt. Herran, First Iowa. The gallantry osing the enemy they fell back in good order. Ordered Maj. A. B. Porter to proceed to the rear and take command of the four cnies A, F, D and E of the Iowa troops, under command of Major Porter, and on the left by one company of regular infantry und that I acknowledge valuable aid and assistance from Major A. B. Porter, Adjutant Geo. W. Waldron, who was wounded in the leal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardiwas engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, s last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even s of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansa
hot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of the Captain Mason, Company C, was killed soon after his regiment was engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were n their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all arounng the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of
ut the severest measures would be of any avail. General McClellan directed General Porter, the provost-marshal, to see that discipline was enforced. General Porter General Porter ordered out the battalion of the Third regular infantry, two companies of cavalry, and a battery of some six or eight pieces. The mutineers were encamped on the siired to a more distant part of the meadow. The lines having been formed, General Porter and his staff, accompanied by Colonel Stevens, rode up to the centre. After a moment or two of delay, an aid of General Porter read the orders of General McClellan in a remarkably clear and distinct tone of voice. He stated that he had hears and men could scarcely be distinguished. Immediately behind his aid was General Porter, firm and self-possessed. Col. Stevens was in front of his own regiment, e, in pistol range, by any of the officers. After the orders had been read, General Porter said to Colonel Stevens, Point out the leaders. A squad of men were detail