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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
all the glory. My convictions of the impracticability of the assault were unshaken, but my reasons could not be made known without injurious results. I was in a quandary and saw no way out of it, but personal appeals from such men as Lieutenants B. H. Porter, Preston, and Moreau Forrest, with other considerations, finally had their effect, and I reluctantly consented to go. By the time the watchword for the night had been arranged it was half-past 10 o'clock. As we were taking leave of ou loss. We found this amounted to 124 killed, wounded, and missing, out of 400 men. Among the killed was Lieutenant C. H. Bradford of the Marines. Lieutenant E. P. Williams, Executive of the Powhatan, a brave and dashing officer, and Lieutenants B. H. Porter and S. W. Preston were taken prisoners. They were all exchanged, and Porter and Preston were killed in the second attack on Fort Fisher. Preston, Porter, and Forrest — the last of whom died of yellow fever in the West Indies--were clos
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
e year 1864 the conflict at the West was concluded, leaving nothing to be considered in the grand game of war but Lee's army, held by Grant in Richmond, and the Confederate detachments at Mobile and along the sea-board north of Savannah. Of course Charleston, ever arrogant, felt secure; but it was regarded by us as a dead cock in the pit, and fell of itself when its inland communications were cut. In January Fort Fisher was captured by a detachment from the Army of the Potomac, aided by Admiral Porter's fleet, and Wilmington was occupied by Schofield, who had been brought by Grant from Nashville to Washington and sent down the Atlantic coast to prepare for Sherman's coming to Goldsboro‘, North Carolina,--all converging on Richmond. Preparatory to the next move, General Howard was sent from Savannah to secure Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, as a point of departure for the north, and General Slocum to Sister's Ferry, on the Savannah River, to secure a safe lodgment on the north bank f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
t and moved off in the direction of Atlanta. General Sherman published orders stating that his army would retire to East Point, Decatur, and Atlanta, and repose after the fatigue of the campaign through which it had passed. We were apprised of these instructions soon after their issuance — as well as of nigh every important movement of the enemy-through the vigilance of our cavalry, spies, and scouts, and from information received through Federal prisoners. Upon this date it may be justly considered that the operations round Atlanta ceased. We had maintained a defense, during forty-six days, of an untenable position, and had battled almost incessantly, day and night, with a force of about 45,000 against an army of 106,000 effectives, flushed with victory upon victory from Dalton to Atlanta. Union defenses at Allatoona pass (see also P. 323). from a War-time photograph. A. J. Smith's and Porter's expedition starting from Vicksburg for the Red River. From a War-time sketch.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
with General Sherman, General Steele, and Admiral Porter, it may be enough to observe that they did arranged to send ten thousand men to join Admiral Porter at the mouth of the Red River, and, accompdria, the united forces of Banks, Sherman, and Porter should meet those of Steele within the enemy'sy details indispensable to such a movement. Porter's fleet entered the mouth of the Red River on and two field-pieces. Meantime the advance of Porter's fleet had burst through the dam and raft ninSmith, with Mower, followed on the 18th. Thus Porter and A. J. Smith were at Alexandria ahead of tiMower marched on the 7th, and the same day Admiral Porter, with Kilby Smith and six light-draught; g and sent messengers to notify Kilby Smith and Porter. Emory marched at midnight Major-General A. his artillery on the transports. On the 13th Porter and Kilby Smith re-turned to Grand Ecore, and lexandria in safety. When he heard from Admiral Porter that the Eastport was afloat, Banks, on th[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
e of the troops fighting in the fort. Here they remained till morning, when they returned to their respective ships. When the assault of the column failed, the Ironsides and the monitors were directed to fire into the gun traverses in advance of the positions occupied by the army, and by doing so greatly demoralized the enemy. About 8 P. M. that night the fort fell into our hands after the hardest fighting by our gallant troops, and with its capture fell the last strong-hold Lieutenant Benjamin H. Porter. From a photograph. of the Southern Confederacy on the Atlantic coast. I will not go so far as to say the army could not have stormed Fort Fisher without the diversion afforded by the naval assault, for no soldiers during the war showed more indomitable pluck than the gallant regiments that stormed the fort on that afternoon; but I do say our attack enabled them to get into the fort with far less loss than they would otherwise have suffered. As a diversion the charge of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
Second division, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malvern, Lieut. William B. Cushing (1st attack); Lieut. B. H. Porter (k), (2d attack). Iron-Clads. Canonicus, Lieut.-Com. George E. Belknap. Mahopac, Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (2d attack). Monadnock, Com. E. G. Parrott. New Ironsides, Commo. William Radford. Sauguirst division, Capt. L. L. Dawson, U. S. M. C.; Second division, Lieut.-Com. C. H. Cushman (w) ; Third division, Lieut.-Com. James Parker; Fourth division, Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge. Pioneers, Lieut. S. W. Preston (k).--Malvern, 60 men, Lieut. B. H. Porter (k). Colorado, 218 men, Lieut. H. B. Robeson. Minnesota, 241 men, Lieut.-Com. James Parker. Wabash, 188 men, Lieut.-Com. C. H. Cushman (w). Powhatan, 100 men, Lieut. George M. Bache (w). Susquehanna, 75 men, Lieut.-Com. F. B. Blake. Brookl