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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for C. H. Porter or search for C. H. Porter in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
63 (concerning the fall of Vicksburg and operations on the river), are marked thus*. Flag-ship Black Hawk (3d rate). *Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breese; Fleet-Surgeon, Ninian Pinkney; Assistant Surgeon, J. C. Bertolette; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. H. Sells; Ensigns, W. B. Bridgeman, Merrill Miller, S. H. Hunt and G. M. Brown; Acting Ensigns, G. D. Gove, W. Wardrop, E. Wv. Clark, R. R. Hubbell and D. P. Rosenmiller; Acting-Master's Mates, F. J. Turner, P. H. Brown, James DeCamp, C. H. Porter and F. D. Campbell; Engineers. G. W. Walker, O. G. Ritchie, A. P. Sutherland and Frandford Shepard. Iron-clad steamer Louisville (4th rate). *Lieutenant-Commander, E. K. Owen; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. D. Hoffman; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, D. L. Ruth; Acting-Ensigns, F. Bates; J. T. Blackford, J. G. Waters and S. M. B. Servos; Acting-Master's Mate, H. D. Coffenberry; Engineers, J. B. Fulton, A. W. Hardy. C. W. Reynolds and C. W. Degelman; Acting-Gunner, Wm. Shields, Acting-Car
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
e been closely besieging Port Hudson. For what purpose he marched no one could ever discern, for the gun-boats under Admiral Porter had arrived there before him, taken possession of and destroyed the defences along the river, and opened it so thorouher. He also, a short time after, destroyed two other steamers, the Diana and Hart. Farragut was relieved by Acting-Rear-Admiral Porter at the mouth of the Red River, May 7th, 1863, and crossing overland, joined his squadron below Port Hudson. Heveport. All idea of fortifying Alexandria was abandoned and two or three days afterwards the place surrendered to Rear-Admiral Porter without any resistance. On Farragut's arrival below Port Hudson he again commenced operations against that plact is doubtful whether Butler or Banks could have held their positions for a month. After the fall of Vicksburg, Rear-Admiral Porter descended the Mississippi as far as New Orleans, where the command of the entire river and all its tributaries was