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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 97 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 26 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for David Porter or search for David Porter in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
come down to him unto the third generation. He was the younger son of Commodore David Porter, who won fame in the Constellation and Essex. His grandfather had servin the war for independence. Yet with such a lineage of the free and open sea, Porter, like Farragut, proved that he could adapt himself to the cramped arenas of bay was fearful she would be captured. They kept up a tremendous fire on him; but Porter diverted their fire with a heavy cannonade. They let the chain go, but the mand not sleep until he got back to the ship. Clearing the way — deck on one of Porter's mortar schooners Twenty of these vessels accompanied Farragut's expedition the day. Toward five o'clock flames were seen curling up in Fort Jackson. Commander Porter, who pulled up the river in a rowboat, ascertained that the Fort itself waat knocked her into deeper water. A few minutes later, all on fire, she passed Porter's mortar vessels, and blew up with a faint explosion. When the larger vessel
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
uth of the Cape Fear River. The Raleigh trained her ten guns on the little vessels for nine hours. But they replied with vigor, and finally Flag-Officer W. F. Lynch, C. S. N., under whose direction the Raleigh had been built, judged it best to retire, since she was hardly in a state of completion to warrant coming to close quarters. To the Kansas belongs the honor of capturing the famous blockade-runner Tristram Shandy, May 15, 1864. The Tristram Shandy afterward became despatch vessel to Porter's fleet. her heavy armor and big guns, was pounded into submission by the monitors Weehawken and Nahant, and surrendered after a stubborn defense. The many attempts to gain possession of Charleston Harbor, that were animated as much by sentimental reasons as they were dictated by military necessity, were crowned by at least one success. Part of Morris Island was evacuated by the Confederates on September 7th. The enfilading and breaching batteries in the swamps, together with the comb
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
ur are typical faces of the best that service in the inland navy could produce. The firm features of these men tell of a simple heroism that so often rose to great heights in the battles of the gunboats. These men fought under Bill (Com. W. D.) Porter, elder brother of the admiral, in a ship named after the famous flagship of their father, Commodore David Porter, in the War of 1812. In that old namesake Farragut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of Commodore David Porter, in the War of 1812. In that old namesake Farragut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of the spirit of the navy of former days. Aboard of her too there was abundant opportunity to exemplify that spirit as nobly as was ever done by sailors any-where. From Fort Henry till the fall of Port Hudson the Essex was always in the thick of the fight. One of the Essex's most important services came in the action of July 15, 1862. On Aug. 7 the Arkansas and two gunboats were lying above Baton Rouge ready to cooperate with the Confederate troops in a combined attack on that place. The troop