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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 346 18 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 90 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 67 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 62 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Fitz John Porter or search for Fitz John Porter in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
iceable. We shall hear more fully of these feats hereafter. The rigor of the game began when, on the 29th of April, Admiral Porter opened the guns of his ships on the Confederate intrenchments at Grand Gulf, the Thirteenth Corps (McClernand's) bein flags the business of his life, and hardly every missed a communication of those exchanged between General Grant and Admiral Porter. By this means the first intelligence of Banks' attack upon and repulse from the works of Port Hudson was received a only by the eyes for which it was designed, but by others, if possible, more keen and eager. It said, in effect, to Admiral Porter (being sent by the general in command), that a council of the generals was, in the main, opposed to the paroling of tas, I believe, never defaced by the fire of the enemy. Whether this was chance or intention is another study. I suspect Porter's Pats and Mikes didn't want to hurt it. Far otherwise with the Temple of Justice. The Federal papers say it was the gen
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The draft riots in New York. (search)
, captured and destroyed after a lively fight. My section, of which I had resumed command after it was rescued from Colonel O'Brien, was attacked at Thirty-sixth street and Seventh avenue. I went into battery, but my raw gun detachments worked clumsily, and the mob vanished like smoke into the side streets. As the excitement was intense in that neighborhood, and General Sanford was apprehensive for the safety of the arsenal, I bivouacked where I was, having the Permanent guard, under Lieutenant Porter, First United States Artillery, as my support. Wednesday, July 15.-Several thousand rioters, who were sacking houses and hanging negroes to lamp-posts at Thirty-second street and Eighth avenue, were driven off by Colonel Mott, with a squadron of cavalry, and a battery of the Eighth New York Volunteer Artillery. All through that day, from points in the city five miles apart, came the news of riots and calls for help. One of the latter was from General Sanford, asking to be reliev
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
onel B. N. Harrison, private secretary, Colonels Lubbock, and Johnston, aides-de-camp to Davis, four inferior officers and thirteen private soldiers, besides Miss Howell, two waiting-maids, and several colored servants. This brings us again to the question of Davis' disguise at the time of his capture, touching which I submit the following letter, written by J. G. Dickinson, late Adjutant Fourth Michigan Cavalry, to the Detroit Tribune: I have read John H. Reagan's letter to Governor Porter, in the publication you exhibited to me. It contains severe criticisms upon published statements of General James H. Wilson, concerning the flight, capture, and disguise of Jefferson Davis. I remember Mr. Reagan, who was captured with Davis. I had the honor of being with General Pritchard, as Adjutant of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, at the capture, and personally took part in the arrest of Davis, while he was attempting to escape, disguised in female attire. There has never been any d
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
was relieved by infantry and moved further to the right of the line of battle. After the battle of Williamsburg the Confederate army continued its retreat on Richmond, the cavalry protecting the rear. The Black Horse participated in the dangers and hardships of this service, in performing which they were compelled to subsist on parched corn. Near Hanover Court-House, while on picket duty, the Black Horse assisted in checking the pursuit of General Branch's North Carolina troops by Fitz John Porter, who had overpowered and badly worsted them, and in this effort lost many men wounded and prisoners. The command took part in Stuart's raid around McClellan's army as it lay before Richmond, which was esteemed at the time a brilliant and hazardous feat, and participated in the fight at the old church in Hanover, where the gallant Captain Latane was killed. The regiment to which the Black Horse was attached was now, for a time, camped near Hanover Court-House, and while here an inte
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
to suggest moves by which an advantageous assault might be made. Before the question was at all decided, a dispatch was received from General Stuart, giving us notice that a very strong column was moving up against my right. General Lee ordered me at once to reinforce that part of my line and be ready to repel the attack. I ordered the reinforcing column to the march and rode out rapidly in advance, that I might see precisely what was needed. The threatening column proved to be General Fitz John Porter's command. After seeing it, I reported back to General Lee that it was too light a column, in my opinion, to mean a real attack. This presumption was correct, and the advance soon halted and then withdrew. General Lee then recalled the question of an immediate attack upon the main position of the Federals. I was thoroughly convinced that the position was too strong to be taken without very severe loss, and I suggested to General Lee that the attack be postponed, and that we m