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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 346 18 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 90 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 67 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 62 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fitz John Porter or search for Fitz John Porter in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

pursued the enemy across North-east river. Our total loss in the operations from February eleventh to the capture of Wilmington was about two hundred officers and men killed and wounded. That of the enemy was not less than one thousand killed, wounded, and prisoners; fifty-one pieces of heavy ordnance, fifteen light pieces, and a large amount of ammunition fell into our hands. It affords me pleasure to acknowledge the cordial and constant cooperation of the naval squadron under Rear-Admiral Porter, so far as the nature of the operations would admit. Having no rolling stock at Wilmington, and being nearly destitute of wagon transportation, I was compelled to operate from Newbern alone for the capture of Goldsboro. I had already sent to Newbern about five thousand troops belonging to the various corps of your amy, and directed Brigadier-General I. M. Palmer to move, with as little delay as practicable, with all his available force toward Kinston, to cover the workmen engaged
in given time to prepare and concentrate. When the battle was delivered it was fought by detached commands, in such positions as to be unable to give or receive assistance from each other. Hooker, Franklin, and Sumner's corps were on the right, too distant to receive support from the rest of the forces, while Burnside's force was on the left, at least three miles from where my command was, without any troops being between us, and with Antietam creek, which was not fordable, behind us. Fitz John Porter's corps was behind my position, a mile and a half on the opposite sided of Antietam creek, as a reserve, but it was never brought into action except in small squads. Notwithstanding the disadvantages our army labored under from these arrangements, a decisive victory could have been won at four o'clock on the afternoon of the seventeenth of September, if a strong attack had been made on Sharpsburg from our centre. My command had cleared the enemy from my front, and were in high spiri
another decisive battle of Cold Harbor. By this the writer means what we term the battle of Gaines' Mill, that having been the position held by the corps of Fitz John Porter in the battle of 1862, while Cold Harbor was held by Stonewall Jackson. In the battle of to-day the relations were just reversed we holding Cold Harbor whil division, too, lost very heavily. General Tyler, before reaching the works, was carried off the field, shot in the ankle. One of his regimental commanders, Colonel Porter, of the Eighth New York Heavy Artillery, was killed; immediately after, the Lieutenant-Colonel (Bates) fell dead. Another of his regimental commanders, Coloncertaining that life was extinct, brought away such papers and other articles as were on his person, to forward home to his family. It was difficult to get Colonel Porter's body inside the works, owing to the vigilant attention of rebel sharpshooters, but with the aid of a rope it was accomplished. I heard to-night an incide
Eighty-first Pennsylvania, was this morning brought off the field and sent to a hospital for embalment, then to be forwarded North at the earliest opportunity. Major Hancock, Assistant Adjutant-General of General Barlow's division, at considerable risk of his own life, went out to the body while it laid under the rebel fire, but ascertaining that life was extinct, brought away such papers and other articles as were on his person, to forward home to his family. It was difficult to get Colonel Porter's body inside the works, owing to the vigilant attention of rebel sharpshooters, but with the aid of a rope it was accomplished. I heard to-night an incident worth relating in connection with the rebel assault of two nights ago. About thirty rebels, somewhat more daring than their fellows, crawled on hands and knees up to our breastworks on a part of General Barlow's front. On coming up they met with no resistance from our men, the latter, on the contrary, lending a helping hand to e