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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The colored troops at Petersburg. (search)
could hardly believe the report of a staff-officer, back from the line, that the great mine had been exploded. At about 5:30 A. M. a fairly heavy musketry fire from the enemy had opened. Shortly after, as we lay upon our arms awaiting orders, a quiet voice behind me said, Who commands this brigade I do, I replied. Rising, and turning toward the voice, I saw General Grant. He was in his usual dress: a broad-brimmed felt hat and the ordinary coat of a private. He wore no sword. Colonel Horace Porter, his aide-de-camp, and a single orderly accompanied him. Well, said the general, slowly and thoughtfully, as if communing with himself rather than addressing a subordinate, why are you not in? Pointing to the First Brigade just in my front, I replied, My orders are to follow that brigade. Feeling that golden opportunities might be slipping away from us, I added, Will you give me the order to go in now? After a moment's hesitation he answered in the same slow and ruminating manner,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
d steam, which was the cause of our returning. The whole blame rests with the two pilots of the Virginia. editors. About the middle of February Commodore Mitchell was replaced in the command of the James River squadron by Admiral Semmes, lately the commander of the Alabama. During the six weeks that followed there was very little that the squadron could do. The obstructions at Trent's Reach had been strengthened, and additions had been made to the fleet below. Meantime the Union armies were closing in about Richmond, and at length the fall of the city was inevitable. On the 2d of April, in obedience to orders from Secretary Mallory, Semmes blew up his vessels, landed his men, and proceeded by rail to Danville, N. C., where he remained until Johnston's surrender. On the 3d of April Richmond was occupied, and on the following day the Malvern, Admiral Porter's flag-ship, carried President Lincoln up to the late capital of the Confederacy. Music on Sheridan's line of battle.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. by Horace Porter, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. It was 9 o'clock in the morning of the 29th of March, 1865. General Grant and the officers of his staff had bidden good-bye to President Lincoln and mounted the passenger car of the special train that was to carry them from City Point to the front, and the signal was given to start; the train moved off, Grant's last campaign had begun. Since 3 o'clock that morning the columns had been in motion and the Union Army and the Army of Northern Virginia were soon locked in a death-grapple. The President remained at City Point, where he could be promptly informed of the progress of the movement. The military railroad connecting headquarters with the camps south of Petersburg was about thirteen miles long, or would have been if it had been constructed on a horizontal plane, but as the portion built by the army was a surface road, up hill and down dale, if the rise and fall had been counted in, its
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The fall of Richmond. (search)
rything. Upon my saluting he said: Is it far to President Davis's house? I accompanied him to the house, which was occupied by General Weitzel as headquarters. The President had arrived about 9 o'clock, at the landing called Rocketts, upon Admiral Porter's flag-ship, the Malvern, and as soon as the boat was made fast, without ceremony, he walked on shore, and started off uptown. As soon as Admiral Porter was informed of it he ordered a guard of marines to follow as escort; but in the walk ofAdmiral Porter was informed of it he ordered a guard of marines to follow as escort; but in the walk of about two miles they never saw him, and he was directed by negroes. At the Davis house, he was shown into the reception-room, with the remark that the housekeeper had said that that room was President Davis's office. As he seated himself he remarked, This must have been President Davis's chair, and, crossing his legs, he looked far off with a serious, dreamy expression. At length he asked me if the housekeeper was in the house. Upon learning that she had left he jumped up and said, with a b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
The surrender at Appomattox Court House. by Horace Porter, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. A little before noon on the 7th of April, 1865, General Grant, with his staff, rode into the little village of Farmville [see map, p. 569], on the south side of the Appomattox River, a town that will be memorable in history as the place where he opened the correspondence with Lee which led to the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. He drew up in front of the village hotel, dismounted, and-General Edward O. C. Ord. 14. Brevet Major-General Rufus Ingalls. 10. Brigadier-General John A. Rawlins, chief-of-staff; other members of General Grant's staff: 4. Major-General Seth Williams. 12. Brevet Major-General John G. Barnard. 9. Colonel Horace Porter. 3. Colonel Orville E. Babcock 5. Colonel Ely S. Parker. 6. Colonel Theodore S. Bowers. 11. Colonel Frederick T. Dent. 13. Colonel Adam Badeau. the sides of the room, very much as people enter a sick-chamber when they expect to find the