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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 91 5 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 48 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for William D. Porter or search for William D. Porter in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
te historian. the Essex disabled. Commodore William D. Porter wounded. Fort Henry surrenders. Cfollowing order: The Essex, 9 guns, Corn. Wm. D. Porter, on the right; Cincinnati (flag ship), 13 nd men, including her gallant commander, William D. Porter. She drifted out of the fight totally d officers ventured to call the attention of Capt. Porter to the fact that the officers on the other w, and soon all joined us on the gun deck. Capt. Porter, on coining below, addressed the officers ae first division to give way to the second. Capt. Porter then ordered the first division to the ster already in the discharge of his duties as Captain Porter's successor. He had been saved by a sailoing overboard in much the same manner that Captain Porter had been. This man Eagle was Captain of N him fight his gun. I reported the case to Captain Porter, who decided to let him remain; and this bNeil, Armorer. Gun-boat Essex William D. Porter, Iron-clad gun-boats St. Louis, Carond[5 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ell, Lee, Donaldson, Nichols, Crosby, Woodworth and Lowry. Commodore W. D. Porter's report of engagement at Port Hudson. report of Commandern, each of the wooden ships receiving one or two shots. Commander William D. Porter, of the gunboat Essex, volunteered to go down with his v, Commanding Western Division Gulf Blockading Squadron. Commodore W. D. Porter's report of reconnoissance, with account of engagement of tLower Mississippi. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. D. Porter, Commodore, United States Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary o servant, R. K. Riley, Commanding Gun-boat Anglo-American. Commodore W. D. Porter, Commanding Naval Forces below Vicksburg. Destruction oto some of his transports. On my arrival I was informed by Commodore W. D. Porter that yesterday morning at 2 o'clock the enemy's forces, undgment of her left. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. D. Porter, Commanding Division of Flotilla in Western Waters. Rear-admira
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
struction of the ram Arkansas by the U. S. Gun-boat Essex, Commander Wm. D. Porter. (from a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke.) While the rivperior force, and the ram Arkansas was engaged by the Essex, Captain W. D. Porter, accompanied by the Cayuga and Sumter. She was soon set on arragut was employed in conjunction with General Banks Commander William D. Porter, (afterwards Commodore U. S. Navy.) in forcing his way ih he closely blockaded, and remained there until relieved by Rear-Admiral Porter in the Benton on May 2d, 1863, when he returned overland to passed by her two consorts, the Webb and Music. The Essex, Commander Porter, accompanied by the Cayuga and Sumter, then moved up towards t vessels. As the Essex came within gunshot of the Arkansas, Commander Porter opened fire on her, and in a short time the ram appeared to beter a short engagement. An attempt was made to take from Commander W. D. Porter, his officers and crew, the credit of destroying this vesse