Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Potter or search for Potter in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
Guns 9TH corps. Burnside, Parke StevensonCarruthLeasureEdwards PotterBlissGriffin14 Batts. WillcoxHartranftChrist84 Guns FerreroSigfries. This was left to guard the trains. Two of the white divisions, Potter and Willcox, supported by the 3d, Stevenson's, were sent to penetraed Stuart, by Grant's orders, but had been repulsed. Willcox's and Potter's divisions of Burnside's corps, sent to penetrate the gap between at 5 A. M. to assault A. P. Hill's lines on our right. He had sent Potter's division against Lane's, our extreme brigade on that flank. PottPotter carried the line and captured two guns. Lane re-formed his brigade in some old breastworks, which enfiladed those Potter had taken, drove Potter had taken, drove him out, and recaptured the guns. Wilcox sent two brigades to Lane's help, but they were not needed and were sent back. About 8 A. M., Bur This seemed a rare occasion where he might fall upon Hancock's and Potter's division of the 9th before they could be assisted by the other co
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
ed a better located permanent line at an average distance of a half-mile in the rear. On the 16th, Hancock was in command, and the 9th corps arrived on the field, giving him about 48,000 effectives. He devoted the day to attacks upon each flank of the broken line and succeeded in capturing one redan, No. 4, on Beauregard's left, and three, Nos. 12, 13, and 14, on his right. On the 17th, the fighting began at 3 A. M. and was continued until 11 P. M. The attack at three was conducted by Potter's division of the 9th corps, and was a complete surprise. Extraordinary precautions had been adopted to make it so. No shot was fired. Canteens had been packed in knapsacks, and all orders were transmitted in whispers. The Confederates were so exhausted, by their incessant fighting by day and working by night, that they were sound asleep, with arms in their hands, and double canister in their guns. Only a single gunner was waked in time to pull a single lanyard before the enemy swept ove