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s were following them in quick time, and their artillery so posted on a neighboring and very convenient ridge and so served as to add death and terror to the terrific assaults. As his left was enveloped, Smith brought Hall's brigade, helped by Potts's, to better shelter, but lost 250 men and two field guns captured at the extreme point. It was hard maneuvering in such a storm! Now over the south and east of these trenches, made to face the other way, the soldiers were arratged. They thuold them back for a while. But there was hardly time to turn around. The attack swept in from the opposite quarter. Behind the main line of trenches, and also across the refused part, Hall's brigade was formed to face the foe, partly covered. Potts's brave men made a second line behind Hall's, without cover, and were ready to protect his left flank or to support him directly. I have never known better conduct in battle. Again the Confederates were repulsed with heavy loss or flew to th
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 44: skirmishing at Cheraw and Fayetteville and the Battle of Averysboro (search)
lry as they ran back; when the Confederate rear guard was crossing the river our men soon had possession of the hill where the Fayetteville arsenal was situated. Just as the last Confederate horseman was clearing the bridge over the Cape Fear, Potts's brigade, the leading one of Smith's division, arrived on the field. Potts first took position on Arsenal Hill, and then quickly deployed his skirmishers along the river bank under instructions to make every endeavor to save the bridge. But thPotts first took position on Arsenal Hill, and then quickly deployed his skirmishers along the river bank under instructions to make every endeavor to save the bridge. But the preparation for its destruction was too complete. The Confederates placed their cannon in a good position on the farther shore, and shelled out skirmishers, regardless of the houses of Fayetteville, while the long bridge was bursting into brilliant flame. As our columns came in from the south roads, Slocum's leading corps, the Fourteenth, entered the town from the northwest. The mayor, doubtless having been attracted by Captain Duncan's daring raid to the southern part of the town, haste
33, 534, 539, 642, 643, 551, 663, 564, 678, 604; 11, 26. Pomeroy, S. C., II, 395, 397, 419. Pomphrey, Mr., I, 209. Pope, John, I, 256-266, 268, 269; II, 450. Porter, Andrew, , 155, 169. Porter, A. Toomer, II, 123, 124, 339. Porter, D. D., II, 154. Porter, Fitz John, I, 96, 172. 216, 217, 227, 228, 262, 264, 265, 272, 277, 289, 303, 305, 311, 312, 370. Porter, Horace, II, 567. Portland, Oregon, II, 468-484. Posey, Carnot, 1, 361, 369. Potter, Capt., II, 608. Potts, B. F., II, 9, 138. Prestman, Stephen W., I, 567. Prochet, Robert, II, 556. Quimby, George W., II, 83, 139. Radford, R. C. W., I, 147. Rains, G. J., I, 233. Ramysy, Douglas, I, 158. Randall, G. B., I, 620. Rankin, J. E., II, 445. Ransom, Robert, Jr., I, 318, 331, 337; II, 32-34, 36, 65, 66. Rawlins, John A., I, 460, 479. Raynor, Kenneth, II, 391, 393. Reconstruction, II, 163-445. Reese, Chauncey B., II, 87. Reeve, Isaac V. D., I, 103. Reeves, P. S., I