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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. F. Pratt or search for D. F. Pratt in all documents.

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Richard McCay, boy, splinter-wound of arm, slight; George Taylor, armorer, shell-wound of forehead, slight; Patrick Morrissey, first-class fireman, splinter-wound in ankle, slight; Isaac Hewsom, coal-heaver, (colored,) splinter-wound of leg, slight; Jacob Maggett, coal-heaver, (colored,) splinter-wound of leg, slight; Andrew Achum, second-class fireman, shell-wound of face, slight; James Keefe, marine, splinter-wound of thigh, severe; Frederick Hines, marine, shell-wound of head, serious; D. F. Pratt, private signal corps United States army, fracture of left fore-arm. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. W. Leach, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding United States Ship Lackawanna. Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Oneida. United States steamer Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. sir: I have to report the following casualties, which occurred to-day on board this vessel while passing Fort Morgan, and during an engagement with the fleet of the
itself, nerved them to the most desperate and pertinacious resistance. With weapons in hand, our men rushed forth from their tents, half naked, and engaged the rebels in a hand-to-hand encounter. Meantime a messenger had been despatched to Major Pratt, now in command of the Thirty-fourth Massachusetts infantry, which is still stationed here in this village. In fifteen minutes after Major Pratt had received the intelligence the Thirty-fourth was on the double-quick. But the rebels becomingMajor Pratt had received the intelligence the Thirty-fourth was on the double-quick. But the rebels becoming aware of the approach of our infantry, immediately took to the road and fled up the valley, leaving ten of their dead and four of their wounded. Cole's men immediately mounted and pursued the enemy, but I believe they were unable to come up with them. Nearly all of the prisoners taken by the rebels succeeded in making their escape to Loudon Heights, where they concealed themselves among the rocks and cliffs of the mountain. The weather being extremely cold, and the sides of the mountain b
as prisoners! I don't hanker after any more street-fights. Our entire loss is about one hundred and twenty-five. The Eleventh lost ten killed, including one commissioned officer, and thirty-five wounded and missing. Company A lost five wounded and one missing. He was probably wounded and taken prisoner. Three of them were from Stephenson County. Sergeant C. H. Lutz in the wrist, Samuel Stoner in the leg, and L. Iman in the shoulder. They have been sent to St. Louis, together with Joe Pratt. They were all doing well when they left here. [Iman since reported dead.--Ed. Jour.] The morning after the fight orders came from Vicksburgh to embark immediately for that place. We left Yazoo City on the morning of the seventh, arriving there on the ninth. I have endeavored to give you a short sketch of the fight. You know my fondness for letter-writing, so it is entirely unnecessary for any apologies. Had it not been for the coolness and bravery of Major McKee, who had command