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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 35 3 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
lled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States in 1801, and he was again sent to the Mediterranean with the frigate Essex. Upon the declaration of war against the United States by Tripoli, in 1803, Bainbridge was put in command of the Philadelphia, one of Preble's squadron. On Oct. 11 the Philadelphia struck on a rock neal Tripoli, and was captured, with her commander and crew. At Tripoli Bainbridge and 315 of his men remained prisoners about nineteen months. On his return to the United States, he was received with great respect, and in the reorganization of the navy, in 1806, he became the seventh in the list of captains. Having obtained the rank of commodore, Bainbridge was appointed to the command of a squadron (September, 1812) composed of th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burrows, William, 1785- (search)
Burrows, William, 1785- Naval officer; born in Kensington (now a part of Philadelphia), Oct. 6, 1785; entered the navy, as midshipman, November, 1799; and served under Preble in the war against Tripoli. In March, 1807, he was promoted to lieutenant, and, early in the War of 1812-15, he was placed in command of the sloop-of-war Enterprise. On Sunday, Sept. 5, 1813, he fought the British brig Boxer, with the Enterprise, off Portland, Me. the Boxer was vanquished, but Burrows was slain. For this exploit, Congress voted a gold medal to his nearest male relation.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Creighton, John Orde 1785-1838 (search)
Creighton, John Orde 1785-1838 Naval officer; born in New York City about 1785; entered the navy in 1800; served with Preble in the expedition to Tripoli; was on the Chesapeake when she was attacked by the Leopard in 1807; was first lieutenant on the President during her fight with the Little Belt in 1811; and commanded the Rattlesnake in 1813. He was promoted captain in 1816; commanded the Brazilian squadron in 1829-30; and died in Sing Sing, N. Y., Oct. 13, 1838.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Decatur, Stephen, 1779- (search)
the attack on Tripoli, Aug. 3, 1804. In this action Decatur commanded a gunboat, which he laid alongside of a large Tripolitan war-ship, which he captured after a brief struggle. Immediately boarding another vessel, Decatur had a desperate personal struggle with the commander. The fight was brief but deadly. Decatur slew his antagonist, and the vessel was captured. The Americans withdrew, but four days later renewed the conflict, which was indecisive, but on Aug. 24 and 28, and Sept. 3, Preble repeated the attack, and on the night of Sept. 4 the Intrepid, under Captain Somers as a fire-ship, was lost in the attack, with all on board. In command of the frigate United States, Decatur captured the frigate Macedonian, Oct. 25, 1812, for which Congress gave him a gold medal. the Macedonian was a new ship, rated at thirty-six, but carrying forty-nine guns. She was badly cut in the fight, and Decatur thought best to order his prize to Newport, while he returned in the United State
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dent, John Herbert, 1782-1823 (search)
Dent, John Herbert, 1782-1823 Naval officer; born in Maryland in 1782; entered the navy in 1798; served on the frigate Constellation in 1799 when she captured the French vessels Insurgente and La Vengeance. He had command of the Nautilus and Scourge in Preble's squadron during the war with Tripoli, and took part in the assault on the city of Tripoli in 1804; and was promoted captain in 1811. He died in St. Bartholomew's parish, Md.,. July 31, 1823.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
Nov. 3, 1780Isaac Van WartCapture of AndreSilver. March 9, 1781Brig.-Gen. Daniel MorganVictory of the CowpensGold. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. William A. WashingtonVictory of the CowpensSilver. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. John E. HowardVictory of the CowpensSilver. Oct. 29, 1781Maj.-Gen. Nathanael GreeneVictory at Eutaw SpringsGold. Oct. 16, 1787Capt. John Paul JonesCapture of the Serapis, 1779Gold. March 29, 1800Capt. Thomas TruxtonAction with the Vengeance (French´╝ëGold. March 3, 1805Com. Edward PrebleTripoliGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Isaac HullCapture of the GuerriereGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Jacob JonesCapture of the FrolicGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Stephen DecaturCapture of the MacedonianGold. March 3, 1813Capt. William BainbridgeCapture of the JavaGold. Jan. 6, 1814Lieut. Edward R. McCallCapture of the BoxerGold. Jan. 6, 1814Com. Oliver H. PerryVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 6, 1814Capt. Jesse D. ElliottVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 11, 1814Capt. James LawrenceCapture of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philadelphia, the (search)
Philadelphia, the A frigate of the United States navy. On Oct. 3, 1803, the ship, under command of Captain Bainbridge, chased a corsair into the harbor of Tripoli. In endeavoring to beat off, the Philadelphia struck a sunken rock not laid down in the charts. In that helpless condition Bainbridge and his men were made prisoners, and the vessel was finally released and taken into the harbor of Tripoli. Bainbridge found means to inform Preble, at Malta, of his misfortune, and suggested the destruction of the Philadelphia, which the Tripolitans were fitting for sea. The Americans had captured a ketch, which was taken into the service and named Intrepid. She was assigned to the service of cutting out, or destroying, the Philadelphia. Lieut. Stephen Decatur was placed in command, and, with seventy determined young men, sailed for Tripoli, accompanied by the brig Siren, Lieut. Charles Stewart. On a moonlight evening (Feb. 16, 1804) the Intrepid sailed into the harbor, and was warpe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Preble, Edward 1761-1807 (search)
Preble, Edward 1761-1807 Naval officer; born in Portland, Me., Aug. 15, 1761. At the age of sixteen years he made a voyage to Europe in an American privateer, and in Edward Preble. Medal presented to Commodore Preble. 1779, when eighteen years of age, served as midshipman in the Protector. He was made prisoner and wasEdward Preble. Medal presented to Commodore Preble. 1779, when eighteen years of age, served as midshipman in the Protector. He was made prisoner and was in the Jersey prison-ship (q. v.) for a while. After the war he occupied himself as shipmaster until 1798, when he was named one of the five lieutenants appointed by the government. In 1799 he was commissioned captain, and made a voyage to the East Indies in the Essex for the protection of American commerce. In 1803 he took comCommodore Preble. 1779, when eighteen years of age, served as midshipman in the Protector. He was made prisoner and was in the Jersey prison-ship (q. v.) for a while. After the war he occupied himself as shipmaster until 1798, when he was named one of the five lieutenants appointed by the government. In 1799 he was commissioned captain, and made a voyage to the East Indies in the Essex for the protection of American commerce. In 1803 he took command of the frigate Constitution, and in June, as commodore, was placed in command of the squadron sent against Tripoli. By a series of skilful bombardments of Tripoli he brought its ruler to terms. He was superseded by Barron, in September, 1804, and returned home, when Congress voted him the thanks of the nation and a gold med
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Preble, George Henry 1816-1885 (search)
Preble, George Henry 1816-1885 Naval officer; born in Portland, Me., Feb. 25, 1816; nephew of Edward Preble: entered the navy as midshipman, Oct. 10, 1835; served in the Mediterranean and the West Indies; became passed midshipman in 1841; served in the Florida War, and in the St. Louis went round the world as acting master and acting lieutenant. He also served in the war with Mexico as executive officer of the Petrel. He became lieutenant early in 1848, while yet in service against Mexico; and from 1849 to 1851 he was attached to the coast survey, also in 1852-53. He was in the expedition to Japan and China (1852-56), and destroyed Chinese pirates in 1854. Afterwards he was with the South Pacific Squadron; and during the Civil War he was an active commander in the Gulf region. He was with Farragut at New Orleans in May, 1862, and in July was commissioned commander. He commanded the naval brigade at the battle of Honey Hill, S. C. In 1867 he was commissioned captain and bec
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sabin, Lorenzo 1803-1877 (search)
Sabin, Lorenzo 1803-1877 Historian; born in New Lisbon, N. H., Feb. 28, 1803; was selfeducated; became prominent in the politics of his native State. In 1852 he was made a secret agent of the United States Treasury Department to look after United States commerce with the British colonies under the Ashburton treaty. He was the author of a Life of Commodore Edward Preble; The American loyalists, or biographical sketches of adherents to the British Crown in the War of the Revolution; Report on the principal fisheries of the American seas; Hundredth anniversary of the death of Major-General James Wolfe, etc. He died in Boston, Mass., April 14, 1877.
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