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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
o other and more congenial editorial engagements. Our friend Whittier, wrote Mr. Jour. of the Times, Dec. 5, 1828. Garrison, in introducing a poem of his, seems determined to elicit our best panegyrics, and not ours only, but also those of the public. His genius and situation no more correspond with each other than heaven and earth. But let him not despair. Fortune will come, ere long, with both hands full. Another young editor who was noticed and commended in the Journal was George D. Prentice, then conducting the New England Weekly Review at Hartford, in which he was, a year later, to be succeeded by Whittier; but while praising his vigor and independence, Mr. Garrison also criticized the tendency to coarseness which even then betrayed itself in his writings. The winter which he spent in Bennington was a very happy one to Mr. Garrison. He was relieved, from the outset, of all pecuniary responsibility and anxiety, the gentlemen who had invited him there assuming the fina
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
considered our proper editorial privileges. It is doubtful if any Northern editor expressed himself with more vigor and fearlessness on the subject than George D. Prentice, then conducting the New England Weekly Review at Hartford. He was at that time a warm admirer of Garrison, though he had never seen him, and, after a care. Thank Heaven, we are not in Maryland, nor within the jurisdiction of the Court from which our friend received his sentence (N. E. W. Review, May 31, 1830). Prentice soon after resigned his position to Whittier and removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where, as editor of the Journal, he became wholly subservient to the Slave Powe trial as a mockery of justice. Indeed, I was in danger of being lifted up beyond measure, even in prison, by excessive panegyric and extraordinary sympathy. Prentice was certainly unstinting in his praise. Mr. Garrison is too well known to the public, he said, to need from us any testimonial either of his talents or his virt
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
writer's native New England, whose time-serving, Lib. 1.18. unprincipled and heartless editors were prompt to denounce his violent and intemperate attacks on slaveholders, and his mawkish sentimentality. That transplanted New Englander, George D. Prentice, newly put in charge of the Louisville (Ky.) Journal, wrote in his issue of January 25: Mr. Garrison knows that we Lib. 1.27. are his personal friend, and that we regard him as one of the ablest writers and warmest philanthropists of the foes of human freedom. His office was a rendezvous to which came men of all grades and professions—fellow-editors like David Lee Child, Massachusetts Journal and Tribune, Boston; John G. Whittier, New-England Weekly Review, Hartford, as George D. Prentice's successor; William J. Snelling, The Amateur, Boston; Moses Thacher, The Boston Telegraph; and Oliver Johnson; The Christian Soldier, Boston, printed on the Liberator press. These editors, again, were lawyers, ministers, and litt
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
ued till near midnight, and then broke up, without Mr. Tappan's fully explaining himself, except that he said he did not mean to lower the standard of his principles on this subject, but that he thought we might unite with the Union men so far as they felt disposed. He left Boston the next morning for New Haven, where he penned the letter to the Boston Recorder which you can see by referring to that paper of Also, Lib. 5.19. the 23d inst. I give you these facts as I received them from Mr. Prentice, who spent several days in Boston last week. I believe I have got the substance correct. A breach is confidently anticipated by the Boston abolitionists. Several persons have written Mr. Tappan from different places, I understand, enquiring if he meant the sentiments contained in that letter should be received as coming from an individual, or the President of the American A. S. Society. . . . I sincerely hope the difficulty will be healed, if it can be, without yielding principle.