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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
On the 13th of May the Confederate army steamer Planter was brought out of Charleston Harbor, in broad daylight, by the colored pilot Robert Smalls, and delivered to the blockading squadron. A week later, the Albatross and Norwich, under Commander Prentiss, steamed up to Georgetown, S. C., and, finding the works deserted, passed along the city wharves. No attack was made on the vessels; but Prentiss did not land, as he had no force of troops to hold the city. Toward the end of the same montPrentiss did not land, as he had no force of troops to hold the city. Toward the end of the same month Commander Drayton, in consequence of information given by the pilot Smalls, ascended the Stono River with a force of gun-boats, occasionally engaging the enemy. In September, 1862, the Confederates in Florida attempted to regain possession of the St. John's River, and for this purpose constructed a fort at St. John's Bluff, arming it with heavy rifles. Commander Steedman, of the Paul Jones, then in command in the St. John's, supported by a force of troops under General John M. Brannan,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
act as a ram if opportunity offered. Captain Strong waited for no orders, but seeing the huge ram coming for the fleet left his place in the line and attacked her, as narrated. It was at this time that the Monongahela's first lieutenant, Roderick Prentiss, a brave and gifted young officer, received his death wound, both legs being shattered. At last all the fleet passed the fort, and while the ram ran under its guns the vessels made their way to the Hartford and dropped their anchors, exc Buchanan in the Merrimac. The casualties of the Union fleet, as reported by Admiral Farragut, were 52 killed and 170 wounded, as follows:  Killed.Wounded. Hartford2528 Brooklyn1143 Lackawanna4 35 Oneida830 Monongahela First-Lieutenant Roderick Prentiss died a day later, as already mentioned.0 6 Metacomet12 Ossipee17 Richmond02 Galena01 Octorara110 Kennebec16 To the above should be added the casualties on board the Tecumseh, viz., 93 drowned and 4 captured, making the to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
ooks and Henry Farmer. Gun-boat Kineo. Lieutenant-Commander, George M. Ransom; Lieutenant, Frederick Rodgers; Assistant Surgeon, A. S. Oberly; Assistant Engineers, S. W. Cragg, James Maughlin, C. F. Hollingsworth and C. J. McConnell; Acting-Masters, Oliver Colburn and L. A. Brown; Acting-Masters' Mates, W. S. Keen, John Bartol, Jr., W. H. Davis and G. A. Faunce; Acting-Assistant-Paymaster, S. P. N. Warner. Gun-boat Pembina. Lieutenant-Commander, Wm. G. Temple; Lieutenant, Roderick Prentiss; Assistant Surgeon, A. W. H. Hawkins; Assistant Paymaster, H. L. Wait; Assistant Engineers, Jefferson Young, John Van Vovenberg, Absalom Kirby and J. F. Bingham; Acting-Masters, Wm. Rogers and J. A. Jackaway; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. Sydden and B. M. Chester; Acting-Masters' Mate, H. C. Cochrane. Sloop-of-war Vincennes. Lieutenant-Commander, John Madigan, Jr.; Assistant Surgeon, D. M. Skinner; Second-Lieutenant Marines, N. L. Nokes; Acting-Boatswain, John Smith; Acting-Gunner, Wm. Wil
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
nuary, and is, therefore, incomplete. Store ship Potomac. Commander, Alex. Gibson; Assistant-Surgeon, Geo. R. Brush; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Wood; Chaplain, Robert Given; Captain of Marines, Geo. W. Collier; Acting-Master, Geo. D. Upham; Acting-Ensigns, Edwin Cressy and L. B. King; Acting-Master's Mates, A. Whiting, W. H. Metz and James Connell; Gunner, Henry Hamilton; Acting-Carpenter, John C. Hoffman. *steamer Monongahela. Commander, James H. Strong; Lieutenant, Roderick Prentiss; Surgeon, David Kindleberger; Assistant Paymaster, Forbes Parker; Acting-Masters, Ezra Leonard and Chas. Higgins; Ensign, G. M. Brown; Acting-Ensigns, C. D. Sigsbee, D. W. Mullen and H. W. Grinnell; Acting-Master's Mate, V. S. Armand; Chief Engineer, Geo. F. Kutz; Second-Assistants, Joseph Trilly and N. B. Clark; Third-Assistants, J. J. Bissett, Edw. Cheney, P. G. Eastwick and P. J. Langer; Boatswain, Wm. Green; Gunner, J. D. Fletcher. *steamer Metacomet. Lieutenant-Commander, Ja
neer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela. U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 10, 1864. sir: The following persons, wounded in the action of the fifth instant, were sent to the Naval Hospital at Pensacola. Lieutenant R. Prentiss, both legs, left one amputated. Michael Smith, boy, scalp. Wm. Feeney, private marine, contusions. I am, respectfully, David Kindleberger, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Commander James A. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela. Repor the U. S. S. Monongahela. United States steamer Monongahela, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. sir: The following are the casualties on board this ship, resulting from the action to-day with Forts Morgan and Gaines and the rebel rams: Roderick Prentiss, Lieutenant, both legs badly injured by splinters, left one amputated; Michael Smith, boy, severe lacerated wound of scalp by splinters; William Feeney, Paymaster, contusion of back and left arm, slight; Holbert Lane, Surgeon's Steward, wou
fifteen wagons. After several skirmishes with the enemy, General Blunt descended Arkansas River, and on the first of September occupied Fort Smith, Arkansas. The main body of our troops in the Department of the Missouri had, in the early part of the season, been sent to reenforce General Grant before Vicksburgh. Taking advantage of this reduction of force, the enemy moved against Helena and attacked that place on the fourth of July. After a severe engagement he was defeated by Major-General Prentiss, with a heavy loss in killed and wounded, and one thousand one hundred prisoners. Our loss, in killed, wounded, and missing, was only about two hundred and fifty. As soon as Vicksburgh had capitulated, Major-General Steele was sent with a force to Helena, with instructions to form a junction with Brigadier-General Davidson, who was moving south from Missouri by Crowley's Ridge, and drive the enemy south of Arkansas River. The junction being effected, General Steele established his
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
ssistant Inspector-General. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, Thirtieth Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, Provost-Marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson, Ordnance Officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: Twenty-ninth Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerson; One Hundred and Sixteenth New-York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the Thirteenth army corps were also employed. I feel that I have done but feeble justice to the work or the persons engaged in it. Being severely indisposed, I feel myself unable to go into further details. I trust some future historian will treat this matter as it deserves to be treated, because it is a subject in which the whole country should feel an interest, and the nob