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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 44 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for W. H. Prescott or search for W. H. Prescott in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 7 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
, June 9, 1842. dear Legare,—A nice place it is, to be sure, as you say, and I do not wonder that you spent sundry happy days here last summer, except that there were so many people in it. We came a week ago, and had the Prescotts and Gray, Judge and Mrs. Prescott, Mr. W. H. Prescott and his daughter, and Mr. F. C. Gray. till day before yesterday, when they returned, and left us to enjoy this rich and beautiful nature quite alone. It is really delicious. Don't you think we can tempt youMrs. Prescott, Mr. W. H. Prescott and his daughter, and Mr. F. C. Gray. till day before yesterday, when they returned, and left us to enjoy this rich and beautiful nature quite alone. It is really delicious. Don't you think we can tempt you to give up at Washington and come here? We can offer you the beautiful woods and valleys you know of, and as many sheep as your shepherd's craft can manage. It would be better than being the Poimenos Laon; especially when the people don't follow. Not a soul has disturbed` our peaceful repose, except that Colonel Colden and the Dickenses came, one night after we were gone to bed, and cleared out the next day at noon, much grieved that the Shakers were so insensible to his widespread merit, a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
in; and after the brilliant illustrations of both, furnished by yourself and Mr. Prescott, no one will have an excuse for ignorance. Begging you to excuse this slinize as not English. This is not only remarkable in such works as yours and Mr. Prescott's, but even, as it strikes me, in the lighter literature, as far as I see itellow of the Society of Antiquaries. You will be united in this with Everett, Prescott, and Bancroft. Lord Mahon, as President of the Society, said at its annual m that country. At present we have four, namely, Mr. Everett, Mr. Bancroft, Mr. Prescott, and Mr. Ticknor,—an accession of talent and high character of which any socy book, but says he shall answer what I have said about the Buscapie. Young Prescott has returned lately, and brought me the fine copies of Ayllon's Cid, 1579, ande will read with pleasure, for the sake of the few words in which he speaks of Prescott and myself, and for the broad view he gives—after his grand, generalizing fash
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
avery, I assure you. . . . . At last, however, mentioning the arrival of Mr. Prescott with a party of friends, he adds, They will stay till Friday, so as to dine dine with the Three Holy Kings of Cologne. The description, in the Life of Prescott, of the attentions showered upon his friend, might be applied with equal truthober, and he wrote thus to Mr. Ticknor afterwards: Sir Charles Lyell says of Mr. Prescott, Prescott's visit has been a source of great pleasure to us, and, though I cPrescott's visit has been a source of great pleasure to us, and, though I can by no means sympathize with MacAULAYulay's astonishment that, being what he is, he should ever go back to Boston, I cannot help regretting that the Atlantic shouldother, and all others. . . . . Your friends here are, I believe, all well. Prescott, with a gay party, is gone to Niagara, and sends pleasant accounts back, comin in my own eyes, as well as those of all who are interested in its subject. Prescott is well, and is busy with his Philip II., but the state of his eyes compels hi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
Chapter 16: Visit to Europe for the affairs of the Boston Public Library. London, Brussels, Dresden, Berlin, and Vienna. Verona. Milan. letters to Mr. Prescott, Mr. Everett, Mr. And Mrs. W. S. Dexter, and Mrs. Ticknor. The motives and causes which led Mr. Ticknor to decide on a third visit to Europe have been set forth, as well as the nature of the work he did during the thirteen months it covered. The marriage of his younger daughter to Mr. William Sohier Dexter, which tookor the Library, and in Berlin he did a great deal of laborious work. But in Berlin, as in Dresden, he found old and new friends, and in subsequent letters he describes his enjoyment of daily intercourse with Humboldt, Mr. Ticknor writes to Mr. Prescott, after this visit: Humboldt was much changed, as might be anticipated; for the difference between sixty-seven and eighty-seven is always much greater than between forty-seven and sixty-seven: these being, respectively, the intervals of my acqu
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
Chapter 17: Italy. winter in Rome. Florence, Turin, Paris. letters to Mr. Prescott, Count Circourt, and Mr. Greenough. To William H. Prescott. Rome, November 24, 1856. Dear William,—. . . . We have had delicious journeyings, fine weather without interruption. . . . . The consequence is that we have enjoyed ourselves very much. Indeed, I doubt whether a gayer party has crossed the Alps this year; and now we have been four days settled at Rome, at the Hotel des Iles Briy was distressing, and nothing could be thought of but rapid preparations for returning to America. Better accounts soon followed, but the pleasant days were almost put out of mind, and no history of them was written out. One short letter to Mr. Prescott is dated after the ill news came. Paris, Thursday Morning, June 18, 1857. Dear William,—I thank you, I thank you, I thank you a thousand times for your thoughtful kindness in sending me your letter about my darling child, and getting
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
Chapter 18: London. letters to Mrs. Ticknor. Harrow. British Museum reading-room. anecdote of Scott. W. R. Greg. Tocqueille. MacAULAYulay. Wilson. Spanish studies. letter to Mr. Prescott. Due d'aumale. To Mrs. Ticknor. London, July 3, 1857. Dearest wife,—I am here safe in gentle Ellen's Mrs. Twisleton. kind care. I wish I could add that I am easy in my thoughts. . . . . I want to know every hour how you are. I want to seem to do something for you . . . . I wish heartily, half the time, that I had never left the Arago, and sometimes think that the storm in which I escaped over the side of that vessel was a sort of warning to me not to leave it. But there is no use in all this; rather harm. . . . . We Miss Cushman and Miss Stebbins were his companions on this journey to London. did not reach Southampton till the five-o'clock train had been gone ten minutes. So we made ourselves comfortable, with a mutton-chop and a cup of tea, at an excellent in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
orence, 311-315, 321-311; winter in Home, 315, 316, 341-349; Naples, Florence, Turin, Paris, London, 317, 349-404. 1857-70. In Boston, 404-498. 1859-64. Life of Prescott, 436-440, 444, 449-456. 1861-65. Civil war, 433-435, 440-444, 446-449, 458-461. 1866-70. Summers at Brookline, 457, 485, 488. 1871. January 26, his death in Bo on international copyrights, 278-280; labors for the Boston Public Library, peculiar views for it, 800-304, 300, 307, 316-319; correspondence, 402-435; death of Prescott, 430: his own feeling about his Memoir of Prescott, 451, 454, 456; old age, 457; correspondence, 457-491; last days, 492-494; his special mental gifts, 495; combPrescott, 451, 454, 456; old age, 457; correspondence, 457-491; last days, 492-494; his special mental gifts, 495; combination of an efficient intellect, high moral purpose, and a vigorous will, 495-497. Ticknor, George Haven, son of G T , birth and death of, T 397, 398 Ticknor, Mrs., George, T 335, 336, 345, 346, 350, 379, 384, 386, 3R8, 396, 397. 399, 401, 404, 410 and note, 411, 412, 418, 432 note, 456 note, II 27, 28, 91, 141, 167, 174,