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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 92 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Charles Henry 1847- (search)
Hart, Charles Henry 1847- Author; born in Philadelphia, Feb. 4, 1847; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1869. In 1893 he was appointed chairman of the committee on retrospective American art in the World's Fair exhibition. He is the author of Historical sketch of National medals; Gilbert Stuart's portraits of women; Portraits of Washington; Browere's life masks of Great Americans; and biographical works on Lincoln and Webster; Memoirs of William H. Prescott and George Ticknor.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prescott, William Hickling 1796-1859 (search)
Prescott, William Hickling 1796-1859 Historian; born in Salem, Mass., May 4, 1796; grandson of Col. William Prescott; graduated at Harvard College in 1814; William Hickling Prescott. adopted a literary rather than a professional career, in consequence of an injury to his eye while in college. In 1824 he commenced contributing to the North American review, and in June, 1826, began his History of Ferdinand and Isabella (3 volumes, 1838). This work placed him in the front rank of historiansWilliam Hickling Prescott. adopted a literary rather than a professional career, in consequence of an injury to his eye while in college. In 1824 he commenced contributing to the North American review, and in June, 1826, began his History of Ferdinand and Isabella (3 volumes, 1838). This work placed him in the front rank of historians and was followed by Conquest of Mexico (3 volumes, 1843); Conquest of Peru (2 volumes, 1847); and History of Philip II. of Spain (3 volumes, 1855-58). He intended to add three volumes more, but he did not live to complete them. In 1856 he published Robertson's Charles V., with notes and a supplement. His works have been translated into several European languages. He died in Boston, Jan. 28, 1859.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ticknor, George 1791-1871 (search)
Ticknor, George 1791-1871 Author; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 1, 1791; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1807; admitted to the bar in 1813, but turned his attention to literature; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Harvard College in 1819-35; an originator of the Boston Public Library, and chairman of its board of trustees in 1864-66. His publications include History of Spanish Literature; Outline of the principal events in the life of General Lafayette; Report of the board of visitors on the United States military Academy at West Point for 1826; Life of William Hickling Prescott, etc. He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 26, 1871.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
...Oct. 9, 1858 President Buchanan issues a proclamation respecting an apprehended invasion of Nicaragua......Oct. 30, 1858 Grand Jury of Columbia., S. C., refuses to indict the crew of the slaver Echo......Nov. 30, 1858 Second session assembles......Dec. 6, 1858 Senate leaves the old to occupy the new Senate chamber in the north wing of the extension......Jan. 4, 1859 A bill presented in the Senate giving the President $30,000,000 to purchase Cuba......Jan. 24, 1859 William H. Prescott, author, dies at Boston, Mass., aged sixty-three......Jan. 28, 1859 Oregon admitted as the thirty-third State......Feb. 14, 1859 Daniel E. Sickles, Congressman from New York, kills Philip Barton Key at Washington for adultery with his wife......Feb. 27, 1859 Thirty-fifth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1859 Trial of Daniel E. Sickles begun at Washington, D. C.......April 4, 1859 [It lasted eighteen days and resulted in his acquittal.] A rich gold mine opened in Color
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
witness (1799), Arthur Mervyn ; or Mlemoirs of the year 1793 (1799-1800), Edgar Huntly; or memoirs of a sleep Walker (1801), Jane Talbot (1801), and Clara Howard; or the enthusiasm of love (1801). When, thirty years later, in 1834, the historian Jared Sparks undertook the publication of a Library of American biography, he included in the very first volumewith a literary instinct most creditable to one so absorbed in the severer tasks of history -a memoir of Charles Brockden Brown by W. H. Prescott. It was an appropriate tribute to the first writer of imaginative prose in America, and also the first to exert a positive influence upon British literature, laying thus early a few modest strands towards an ocean-cable of thought. As a result of this influence, all manner of wheels began to move, in fiction; concealed doors opened in lonely houses; fatal epidemics laid cities desolate; secret plots were organized; unknown persons from foreign lands died in garrets leaving large sums o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
y felt that in these stories Irving had come back to his own. The material was very different from that of The sketch book, yet it yielded to similar treatment. The grace, romance, humor, of this beautiful Spanish Sketch Book, as the historian Prescott called it, appealed readily to an audience which had listened rather coldly to the less spontaneous Tales of a Traveller, and had given a formal approbation to the Life of Christopher Columbus without finding very much Irving in it. Historicar's training and methods which we now require in the historian; nor had he a large view of men and events in their perspective. He had, at least, a faculty of giving life and force to dim historic figures, which gained the praise of such men as Prescott and Bancroft and Motley. Washington, for example, had begun to loom vaguely and impersonally in the national memory, a mere great man, when Irving turned him from cold bronze to flesh and blood again. Irving's services to America in diplomac
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
ngton as he did. His critics overlooked the fact that in the first place it was the habit of the time, and all editors in his day felt free to do it; and again that Washington did it freely himself, and often entered in his letter book something quite different from what he had originally written and sent out, which was in fact falsifying the whole correspondence. Then followed George Bancroft, with a style in that day thought eloquent, but now felt to be overstrained and inflated; William H. Prescott, with attractive but colorless style and rather superficial interpretation; Ticknor, dull and accurate; Hildreth, extremely dry; Palfrey, more graceful, but one-sided; John Lothrop Motley, laborious, but delightful; and Francis Parkman, more original in his work and probably more permanent in his fame than any of these. History and literature. But it must be remembered, as the drawback to historical writing, that very little work of that kind can, from the nature of things, be
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
outhern literary Messenger at Richmond, afterward of Burton's Gentleman's magazine, and of Graham's magazine. He published Tamerlane, and other poems (1827); Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and minor poems (1829) ; Poems (1831) ; the narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838) ; The Conchologist's first book (1839) ; tales of the grotesque and Arabesque (2 vols., 1839); Tales (1845) ; The Raven, and other poems (1845); and Eureka, a prose poem (1848). Died in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 7, 1849. Prescott, William Hickling Born in Salem, Mass., May 4, 1796. He graduated from Harvard in 1814, and would have studied law, but defective vision forbade, and he turned his attention to history by the aid of readers. His first work was The history of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic (1838), and was followed by Miscellanies (1845); History of the conquest of Peru (1847); The history of the Reign of Philip II., King of Spain (1855); and the Life of Charles V. After his Abdication (1857). D
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
f Franklin, American men of letters series, 1887. Morse's Life of Franklin, American statesmen series, 1889. William H. Prescott's Life of Charles Brockden Brown (printed in Sparks's Library of American biography, and in Prescott's Biograph H. B. Adams's Life and writings of Jared Sparks, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1893. George Ticknor's Life of William Hickling Prescott, Ticknor & Reed, 1863. Mrs. J. T. Fields's Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1897. Webster's Works, 6 vols., Little & Brown, 1851. Channing's Works, 1 vol., American Unitarian Association, 1886. Prescott's History of the conquest of Mexico, 3 vols., New York, 1843. Parkman's Works, 12 vols., Little, Brown & Co., 1865-18Historical discourse at Concord. 1835. W. G. Simms's The Yemassee and the Partisan. 1836. Holmes's Poems. 1837. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isa-bella. 1838. Hawthorne's Fanshawe. 1839. Longfellow's Voices of the night. 1840. Cooper's T
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
150. Phillips, Katharine, 12. Phillips, Wendell, 10, 43, 270. Piatt, John James, 264. Pickard, Samuel T., 150. Pickering, Thomas, 65. Pickwick papers, Dickens's, 90. Pinkney, Edward C., 216. Pioneers, Cooper's, 239. Pit, Norris's, 255. Poe, Edgar Allan, 90, 118, 143, 165, 190, 206-215, 231. Poor Richard's Aimanac, Franklin's, 58, 59. Pope, Alexander, 9, 40, 108, 158, 166, 219. Portfolio, 65-69. Power of Dullness, Trumbull's, 40. Prairie, Cooper's, 236. Prescott, William Hickling, 71, 73, 74, 87, 117. Prince of the house of David, Ingraham's, 129, 262. Problem, Emerson's, 229. Proud music of the storm, Whitman's, 232. Puritanism, 15, 186, 266-268. Quarterly Review, 164. Quebec, Capture of, 121. Quincy, Edmund, 88. Quincy, Josiah, 169. Quincy, Mrs., Josiah, 90. Radcliffe, Mrs., 72. Ramona, Mrs. Jackson's, 127, 128. Raven, Poe's, 211. Reid, Mayne, 262. Republican Court, Griswold's, 54. Rhode Island almanac, a, Franklin's, 58.
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