hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 44 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for W. H. Prescott or search for W. H. Prescott in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
llege classmate whose name was familiar to the earlier pages of this Memoir, wrote from Lowell, Sept. 8, stating his conviction that the doctrines of the oration were not adapted to human nature; but saying: As a literary composition, I read it with unqualified satisfaction. I see the old style, the old hand and mind. But it is ripened, condensed, filled up with flowers and fruit, ripe scholarship grafted on a thoughtful mind. Many of its passages rise into eloquence of high order. Mr. Prescott wrote Life of W. H. Prescott, pp. 352, 353. from Pepperell, Aug. 15:— Thank you for your Discourse, which I have read—notes and all— with great pleasure and great instruction. You have amassed a heap of valuable and often recondite illustrations in support of a noble cause. And who can refuse sympathy with the spirit of philanthropy which has given rise to such a charming ideal?—but a little too unqualified. There can be no war that is not dishonorable. I can't go along