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he Lord preserve the days of Your Holiness, and keep you under His divine protection. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. The Pope's reply. illustrious and Honorable President, salutation: We have just received with all suitable welcome the persons sent by you to place in our hands your letter, dated 23d of September last. Nos the pleasure we experienced when we learned, from those persons and the letter, with what feelings of joy and gratitude you were animated, illustrious and honorable President, as soon as you were informed of our letters to our venerable brother John, Archbishop of New York, and John, Archbishop of New Orleans, dated the 18th of Or that the American people may obtain peace and concord, and dwell charitably together. It is particularly agreeable to us to see that you, illustrious and honorable President, and your people, are animated with the same desires of peace and tranquillity which we have in our letters inculcated upon our venerable brothers. May it
May the Lord preserve the days of your Holiness and keep you under his divine protection. Jefferson Davis. Reply of the Pope. illustrious and honorable President: Salutation. We have just received, with all suitable welcome, the persons sent by you to place in our hands your letter, dated twenty-third of September ls the pleasure we experienced when we learned, from these persons and the letter, with what feelings of joy and gratitude you were animated, illustrious and honorable President, as soon as you were informed of our letters to our venerable brothers, John, Archbishop of New-York, and John, Archbishop of New-Orleans, dated the eighteer that the American people may obtain peace and concord, and dwell charitably together. It is particularly agreeable to us to see that you, illustrious and honorable President, and your people, are animated with the same desires of peace and tranquillity which we have in our letters inculcated upon our venerable brothers. May it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
urteen hundred and fifty-four dollars in silver, retaining this paper and the proper receipt subject to future regular settlement. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. M. H. Clark will pay in addition to the within requisition, eighteen dollars, one month's pay, for E. H. Burns. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. Received of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. S., fourteen hundred and seventy-two ($1,472) in full of within requisition. C. H. C. Brown, Lieutenant Commanding President's Guara. Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer: Pay to A. G. Cantley, a clerk in the Post-office Department, fifty dollars in specie and preserve necessary vouchers until warrant can be drawn and settlement regularly made. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary of the Treasury. Received the within fifty dollars in specie from M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. S. A. A. G. Cantley. Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865 The Secretary of the Treasury is
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
t in deference to the wishes of others. In the Library of the Massachusetts Historical Society is preserved a manuscript letter from Mr. Brattle to Rev. Rowland Cotton of Sandwich, dated Nov. 6, 1696, in which he says: I wrote to your good father the last week, and therein acquainted him and yourself, &c., that the ordination at Cambridge is designed (God willing) 25 this instant. Shall be glad to see you and others my friends, and in the meantime entreat your good wishes. I trust the Reverend President will preach the ordination-sermon; it is my hearty desire, and that which must be, otherwise I shall have great dissatisfaction in my own mind, it being, according to my best light, most proper that, when there is time but for one sermon on such days, some grave Divine, and not the young Candidate, should give the said sermon. As a compromise, Mr. Brattle preached to gratify those who adhered to the custom, and in compliance with his earnest desire Dr. Mather preached, as appears b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. (search)
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An address before the ladies' memorial Association. (search)
An address before the ladies' memorial Association. With Glowing apostrophe to General T. J. Jackson, at Charlotte, N. C., May 10th, 1906. By Hon. R. T. Bennett, Late Col. of the 14th N. C. Regiment, C. S. A. [As to other addresses of Col. Bennett and notice of his admirable career, see Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXXIII, p. 65.—Ed.] Madame President, Ladies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Citizens: When that illustrious man William Edward Gladstone lay in the crisis of his fate, which closed in his death May 18th, 1898, messages of sympathy from the foremost men of our Christian world were read to him, and he murmured at intervals, Kindness, kindness, kindness! at length as prayers were ended he exclaimed, Amen! There is sunshine in my soul to-day. You have given me manifestations of sympathy akin to affection. An old man taken in the act of doing right is your guest to-day. I value beyond weights and measures the good opinion of our
birth in the guard house. The Orange and Alexandria Railroad is being rapidly repaired. We understand the Government is repairing and intends to bring into use, for military purposes, the railway track from the Baltimore and Ohio depot, now laid along the Capitol grounds and Maryland avenue to the Long Bridge. It will probably be extended across the bridge, and will afford greatly increased facilities for the transportation of provisions, &c. Private T. C. Caustin, Capt. Owen's President's Mounted Guard, whose wife lives near Seneca, Maryland, 22 miles above Georgetown, went to visit her Monday night, and was taken prisoner by Secession troops, who crossed from the Virginia shore in a boat. The last heard of Mr. C. was at Manassas Junction, probably en route to Richmond to be imprisoned. Great activity prevails in the Ordnance Department at the Navy-Yard. A large force of workmen are employed in casting, furnishing and mounting howitzers. The foundry is filled with
Extract from Patrick Henry's Speech before the Virginia Convention in 1775. Mr. President: It is natural for man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth — to know the worst, and to provide for it. I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past; and judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British Ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to sol
An interesting document. --The report read before the annual meeting of the Young Men's Christian Association, by J. B. Walking, Esq. President throwing the operations of the Associations for the past real in the camp and hospitals of this city and vicinity, alluded to by us in a late issue, presents one of unusual interest and usefulness, of which we append a brief synopsis. It will amply repay perusal: After a commentary on the war, the report goes on to state that it has materially influenced the labors of the Association in closing up some avenues of usefulness and opening others. It has enlisted at least three fourths of its effective material in calling to the field several hundred of its best members. Its mission has been manifold, and its ordinary objects removed by the transfer of our native young men from their homes to the army and the substitution of strangers and sojourners, who have come forth from other States and neighborhoods to brave the brunt of the ba
r being the tool of a party. No man approaches him in that respect, and no man is wanted there but one who will be a tool, and nothing but a tool, of the Black Republican mob. Brains are not wanted, heart is not wanted, not even brute courage is wanted; nothing but a voice that can echo and a hand that can register the black passions and beastly purposes of the Black Republican populace. Lincoln knows all this, and delights in the knowledge.--Only let him be President, and Mrs. Lincoln Mrs. President, and the little Lincolns little Presidents in future, and he will be proud and happy to be the tool of any party under the sun. What the result of the United States election will be it is impossible to predict. If its people were like any other people the vulgar ignoramus who has stolen away their liberties would never be permitted to retain them. But he has the enormous patronage of the Federal Government at his back, and the nation whom he rules are not insensible to the captiva
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