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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Xerxian army Yet subdued a foe Who but asked a blanket On a bed of snow. Shivering, 'midst the darkness, Christian men are found, There devoutly kneeling On the frozen ground— Pleading for their country, In its hour of woe— For its soldiers marching Shoeless through the snow. Lost in heavy slumbers, Free from toil and strife, Dreaming of their dear ones— Home, and child, and wife— Tentless they are lying, While the fires burn low— Lying in their blankets, 'Midst December's snow. Margaret Junkin Preston. Cavalry crossing a ford A line in long array where they wind betwixt green islands, They take a serpentine course, their arms flash in the sun,— hark to the musical clank, The shadowy forms of horses These scenes from a bivouac of McClellan's army, in 1862, reveal, in much the same spirit as Whitman's poem, the actual life of the soldier. At the end of a hard day's march, officers and men were tired, and horses and mules were willing to be unhitched and to nibble o
a number of men as may be sufficient to put the colony in a posture of defense. This was Henry's opportunity. A past whose memory makes is thrill—the Jamestown church Where Patrick Henry spoke Acceptation The position of Margaret J. Preston, a representative poet of the Confederacy, has already been commented on. The fact that one sister, Elinor Junkin, was the first wife of Stonewall Jackson, and that to another at the close of the war fell the honor of providing a home in LThen courage, brothers!—Though each breast Feel oft the rankling thorn, despair, That failure plants so sharply there— No pain, no pang shall be confest: We'll work and watch the brightening west, And leave to God and Heaven the rest. Margaret Junkin Preston. Mourning women among the Richmond ruins—April, 1865 A somber picture that visualizes Margaret Preston's poem Acceptation. Our Eyes Welcome Through Tears the Sweet Release From War. A second review of the grand army I read la
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
ons through many years of my life. Some years later Margaret J. Preston wrote to Hayne: Poetry has been only my pastime,o the Indians and afterwards a brigadier-general. Margaret Junkin Preston, born in Philadelphia, revealed in Beechenbrook—a selected from, 71 in all, the only noteworthy one being Mrs. Preston. There are thirteen poems on Stonewall Jackson, only tgraphical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and surprisingly short ones of Ticattles on Virginia soil, John R. Thompson (1822-73) and Mrs. Preston (1820-97) stand out as the most conspicuous. Of distin both of them the finest types of Virginia gentlemen. Mrs. Preston wrote a still more beautiful tribute to Ashby, in which the tributes to the great leaders of the Confederacy. Mrs. Preston's Only a private and Mrs. Townsend's The Georgia Volunhn Williamson Palmer (1825-1906). Excellent also are Margaret J. Preston's Stonewall Jackson's grave and Under the shade of t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
colonies, 107-108 Polk, J. K., 183, 291, 302 Poor Richard, 214 Pope, 63, 94, 225, 234, 237 Porter, Noah, 219 Porter, William Sydney, 365, 385, 386, 391, 393-394 Port folio, the, 162, 162 n. Post (Cincinnati), 266 n. Potter, Mary Storer, 34 Pound, Roscoe, 77 Poydras College, 295 Praed, W. M., 242 Precieuses Ridicules, 234 Prentice, George Denison, 153 Prenticeana, 153 Prescott, F. C., 63 n. Prescott, William Hickling, 123-131, 132, 136, 137, 249 Preston, Margaret J., 288, 290, 300, 302, 305, 306, 307, 309, 311 Prince, Thomas, 113 Prince and the Pauper, the, 406 Princeton, 198, 208, 219, 316 Princeton review, the, 208 Princeton Theological Seminary, 208 Proceedings of the Cambridge historical Society, 77 n. Professor at the Breakfast-Table, The, 228, 234 Prometheus (Lowell), 250 Prometheus Vinctus, 2 Prophetic pictures, the, 24 Proud, Robert, 106 Providence Gazette, the, 178 Psalm of life, the, 35 Psalm of the