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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
untried vessels. These commanding officers had long been known to him; many of them had served in the squadron before, and were present at the capture of the Port Royal forts; they were men of the highest professional capacity and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engaged in it. Had any loss of life been regarded as likely to render another attempt successful, there would have been few indeed who would not have desired it. The opinion before the attack was general, and was fully shared in by the writer, that whatever might be the loss in me
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
n the capture of a considerable number of officers and sailors, as well as the loss of several boats. The demand for the surrender of Sumter had informed the enemy, and boats in tow of tugs from the vessels outside of the bar during the whole of the afternoon left little doubt as to an intended attempt. He did not fail, therefore, to put a considerable force into Sumter for the occasion. Commander T. H. Stevens was in command, and Lieutenant-Commander E. P. Williams, Lieutenants Remey, Preston, Higginson, and Ensign Craven, commanded the five divisions of boats. A detachment of marines, under Captain McCawley, formed also a part of the force, numbering in all 400. A request for the loan of some army boats brought the information that General Gillmore also intended making an attack. It was about 10 P. M. before the boats, in tow of a tug, reached the vicinity of Sumter; a sound of musketry, followed by shells from the adjacent forts, announced the assault. Before the Admiral r
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
tack. A rendezvous, twenty-five miles east of New Inlet, is given. Commanders of divisions will get their divisions in line and keep them so. When signal is made to form line of battle, every vessel will take her position, the first division forming first. As low steam will suffice in going into action, those vessels that can move and work handily with half-boiler power will do so, having full boilers without steam next the enemy. Slow deliberate firing will be made. In accordance with this programme, the Louisiana, an old vessel designed for a torpedo on a large scale, was towed from Norfolk by the Sassacus to a remote part of Beaufort Harbor, there anchored and filled with powder, with carefully studied arrangements for firing many centres at the same moment. The vessel was disguised as a blockaderun-ner, and her preparation for service was assigned to Commander Rhind, aided by Lieutenant Preston, Second Assistant-Engineer Mullan, and Master's Mate Boyden, with seven men
chor was let go, the fires hauled, the men put in the boat, and Commander Rhind and Lieutenant Preston proceeded to light the fuses and the fires; the latter had been arranged by Engineer Mullan. Tre. In his report, in reference to preliminary arrangements, Fleet-Captain Breese says: Lieutenant Preston with a de. tail of men from the vessels, threw up, within six hundred yards of the fort, as under Lieutenant Fagan. The manner in which this was done reflects most creditably upon Lieutenant Preston. He states further that four lines of assault were intended, the first of marines, Captai, the batteries, and the casualties in the fleet. Among the killed in the assault were Lieutenants Preston and Porter, both of them young officers of great ability and admirable qualities; also Asto carry his brave heart forward, when, by my orders, he went into the trench thrown up by Lieutenant Preston's party. An interesting letter from Colonel Lamb to Parker is given in the foot-note.
Porter, Rear-Admiral D. D., relieves Admiral Lee, 216 et seq.; report of, 223 et seq., 227; report of, 234, 241 et seq. Port Royal, necessity of seizing, 11 et seq., 16 et seq., 20, 26, 32 et seq, 41 et seq. Port Royal, the, U. S. vessel, 70 Portsmouth, the, U. S. sloop, 7 Potomska, the, 46, 49 et seq., 56, 58 et seq., 64 Potter, General, 156 Powhatan, the U. S. steamer, 7, 74, 228 Preble, Commander George H., 152 Prentiss, Commander G. A., 66 et seq. Preston, Lieutenant S. W., 102, 138, 218, 221, 233; death of, 237 et seq. Princess Royal, the, prize steamer, 79, 81 Proclamations: forbidding all intercourse between Confederate and National forces, 35; concerning the blockade at Charleston, 78 et seq. Pulaski, Fort, see Fort Pulaski Putnam, the, 177 et seq., 181, 183, 194 Q. Quackenbush, Commander, 155, 177, 183, 189 Quaker City, the, 79, 81, 218, 222 R. Raleigh, the, 211 Ranger, the, 179 Read, battery of, 26 Remey