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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 24 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Samuel W. Preston or search for Samuel W. Preston in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
art was in command. In the incomparable Belknap —— the present commodore — he had an executive always ready to do his will, and in the best possible way. We had just lighted our pipes on the Ironsides for an after-dinner chat when Flag-Lieutenant S. W. Preston was announced, with orders for the commander of the Patapsco to report on board the flag-ship. On our way to the vessel Preston informed me that it was the intention of the admiral to attack Sumter that night in boats, and added: Youounted to 124 killed, wounded, and missing, out of 400 men. Among the killed was Lieutenant C. H. Bradford of the Marines. Lieutenant E. P. Williams, Executive of the Powhatan, a brave and dashing officer, and Lieutenants B. H. Porter and S. W. Preston were taken prisoners. They were all exchanged, and Porter and Preston were killed in the second attack on Fort Fisher. Preston, Porter, and Forrest — the last of whom died of yellow fever in the West Indies--were close friends, and alike i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
ate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For this purpose it sent several agents to Europe. The foremost of these was Captain James D. Bulloch, of the Confederate navy, who arrived in England and established himself at Liverpool in June, 1861. Having satisfied himself as to the scope and bearing of the neutrality laws, he lost no time in closing a contract with the firm of Fawcett & Preston, engine builders, of Liverpool, for a screw gun-vessel. The steamer was named the Oreto, and it was announced that she was being built for a firm at Palermo; presumably for the Italian Government. She was a duplicate of the gun-vessels of the English navy. The construction of the vessel proceeded without interruption during the fall and winter of 1861-62. The American Minister, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, twice called the attention of the Foreign Office to her suspected character, and pr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
er, showing on the left the ground over which the naval column charged. From a photograph. there was more space; but, looking back, he discovered that his whole command, with few exceptions, had stopped and joined their comrades. Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston. From a photograph. Making his way to the front, close to the palisade, he found several officers, among whom were Lieutenant-Commanders Parker and Cushman. The situation was a very grave one. The rush of the sailors was over; te, Parker, Cushman, Sicard; Lieutenants Farquhar, Lamson, S. W. Nichols, and Bartlett. A loss of some three hundred in killed and wounded attests the gallant nature of the assault. Among these were several prominent officers, including Lieutenants Preston and Porter, killed; Lieutenant-Commanders C. H. Cushman, W. N. Allen, Lieutenant G. M. Bache, wounded. After their repulse the sailors did good service with the marines by manning the intrenchments thrown up across the peninsula, which
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
t Fisher, Dec. 23-26, 1864, and Jan. 13-16, 1865. North Atlantic squadron: Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding. Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, Fleet Captain. Lieut. M. W. Sanders, Signal Officer. Lieutenant S. W. Terry and Lieutenant S. W. Preston (k), Aides. First division, Commodore Henry K. Thatcher; Second division, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. . R. Breese, Fleet Captain, commanding. First division, Capt. L. L. Dawson, U. S. M. C.; Second division, Lieut.-Com. C. H. Cushman (w) ; Third division, Lieut.-Com. James Parker; Fourth division, Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge. Pioneers, Lieut. S. W. Preston (k).--Malvern, 60 men, Lieut. B. H. Porter (k). Colorado, 218 men, Lieut. H. B. Robeson. Minnesota, 241 men, Lieut.-Com. James Parker. Wabash, 188 men, Lieut.-Com. C. H. Cushman (w). Powhatan, 100 men, Lieut. George M. Bache (w). Susquehan