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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 78 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 41 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for William Preston or search for William Preston in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
limitations in character. Hale's light way of speaking of political questions in private conversation sometimes led observers to misjudge him. See A. H. Stephens's Life, by Johnston and Browne, p. 308; also Reminiscences of Samuel K. Lothrop, pp. 182-183. If the Southern men thought other Northern leaders were playing a part, and would, like Webster and Corwin, yield their position under a sufficient pressure of ambition or selfinterest, they exempted him from such a suspicion. General William Preston of Kentucky, who entered Congress in December, 1852, late in his life, told the writer that the South felt that Sumner was the only Northern man who would never under any circumstances swerve from his position, and the only one whose conversation outside of the Senate corresponded fully to his declarations in it. This statement is introduced here, not as a correct estimate of other Northern leaders, but as the Southern view of them. He was not sincerer in conviction or firmer in pur
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
preciate as he deserved. Sumner went by rail from Lexington to Frankfort and then to Louisville, where he renewed with Mr. and Mrs. William Preston the pleasant relations he had begun with them in Washington. He was taken by Mr. Preston to drivMrs. William Preston the pleasant relations he had begun with them in Washington. He was taken by Mr. Preston to drive on the Indiana as well as the Kentucky side of the Ohio River. Preston, who was then running for Congress against Humphrey Marshall, the Know Nothing candidate, stated to the writer that Sumner said during the drive that the American people woulMr. Preston to drive on the Indiana as well as the Kentucky side of the Ohio River. Preston, who was then running for Congress against Humphrey Marshall, the Know Nothing candidate, stated to the writer that Sumner said during the drive that the American people would never formulate such nonsense as Know Nothingism. He went from Louisville to the Mammoth Cave and to Nashville,—most, if not all, of the way by stage-coach. The hotel accommodations on this part of the route were very primitive. He was obliged tPreston, who was then running for Congress against Humphrey Marshall, the Know Nothing candidate, stated to the writer that Sumner said during the drive that the American people would never formulate such nonsense as Know Nothingism. He went from Louisville to the Mammoth Cave and to Nashville,—most, if not all, of the way by stage-coach. The hotel accommodations on this part of the route were very primitive. He was obliged to share his room with strangers, but he successfully resisted a landlord's pressure to put one into his bed. At Bowling Green he called on Judge Underwood, a public man of liberal views, with whom in the Senate he had maintained friendly intercourse
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
f the city. Butler said in a speech in June, 1856 (Congressional Globe, App. p. 631) that a sword was awarded Brooks for service in the Mexican War; but this is not stated in the eulogies on him at the time of his decease. If it is true, it proves little, as swords and titles were cheaply won in that war. Brooks's relation to Butler, the senator, was remote, being neither that of son, brother, or even nephew; and he was only the son of Butler's cousin, Whitfield Brooks, father of Preston S., and Butler were cousins. O'Neall's Bench and Bar of South Carolina, vol. i. p. 198; vol. II. p. 473.—a consanguinity so distant as according to common ideas not to call for volunteer enlistment in a personal issue between Butler and another. He was sometimes called Butler's nephew, but his defenders generally spoke of him as a near kinsman, prudently abstaining from defining the degree. Brooks was present for only a short time while Sumner was speaking on the first day, and not a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
both thought by spectators to be enjoying the classic and scholarly feast before them. Keitt, the accomplice of Brooks, sat awhile near Senator Hammond. Near Sumner sat Wilson (his colleague), Burlingame, and Lovejoy, and Senators Bingham and Preston King,—all ready to protect him. Seward and C. F. Adams were present a part of the time. The Republican senators, generally in their seats, listened with respect; but excepting perhaps Preston King, all, or nearly all, would have preferred that Preston King, all, or nearly all, would have preferred that the speech should not have been made at that time. Few of them followed a custom among senators to subscribe for copies of the speech to be franked to their constituents. Seward, without expressly objecting to the speech, called it elaborate, unsparing, and denunciatory. (Seward's Life, vol. II. p. 457.) His last adjective was misplaced. Chestnut of South Carolina followed Sumner with an outbreak of coarseness and brutality, which began with a sneer at his sufferings, and ended with a dis