Your search returned 233 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
out to meet them battle at Dug Springs, 46. Price and McCulloch at variance the Confederates atter the battle, Jackson was re-enforced by Generals Price and Ben McCulloch, who came with several tnd McCulloch counseled a retrograde movement. Price entertained a different opinion, and favored aouncil of his officers, exhibited the order to Price, and offered to march immediately on Springfiehe should have the chief command of the army. Price, anxious to drive the Nationals out of MissourPollard's First Year of the War, page 136. General Price reported the number of Missouri State trooiately communicated the astounding fact to General Price. He told him truly, that the main body of officers of Lyon's army; also, reports of Generals Price and McCulloch and their subordinate officehe Committee on the Conduct of the War. General Price, in his report (August 12th, 1861), says tve gained a great victory over the enemy. General Price spoke of it as a brilliant victory, achiev[14 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
tucky. Ben. McCulloch's proclamation Price's appeal to the Missourians, 66. Lexington fomoment, and, with his army, left the State. Price now called upon the secessionists to fill his rth by water; and when Fremont was apprised of Price's northward movement, and the increasing boldnSeptember 24th, 1861. In addition to all this, Price said, I obtained the restoration of the great ty killed, and one hundred and twenty wounded. Price reported his loss at twenty-five killed and seof Mulligan's arrival at Lexington, and of General Price's movements in that direction with continu Arkansas to return to Missouri, should rejoin Price. Believing the latter would follow up his sucouri. These adverse circumstances compelled Price to retreat toward Arkansas. He abandoned Lexiy, on the Osage, but was too late to intercept Price. The armed Confederates at that place, after s. The order for battle was countermanded, Price seems not to have moved his army from Pinevill[32 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
enkins, Martin McHugh, Thomas E. Corcoran, Henry Dow, John Woon, Christ. Brennen, Edward Ringgold, James K. L. Duncan, Hugh Melloy, William P. Johnson, Bartlett Laffey, Richard Seward, Christopher Nugent, James Brown, William Moore, William P. Brownell, William Talbot, Richard Stout, George W. Leland, Horatio N. Young, Michael Huskey, John Dorman, William Farley, J. Henry Denig, Michael Hudson, William M. Smith, miles M. Oviatt, Barnett Kenna, William Halsted, Joseph Brown, Joseph Irlam, Edward Price, Alexander Mack, William Nichols, John Lawson, Martin Freeman, William Dinsmore, Adam Duncan, Charles Deakin, Cornelius Cronin, William Wells, Hendrick sharp, Walter B. Smith, George Parks, Thomas Hayes, Lebbeus Simkins, Oloff Smith, Alexander H. Truett, Robert Brown, John H. James, Thomas Cripps, John Brazell, James H. Morgan, John Smith, James B. Chandler., William Jones, William Doolen, James Smith, Hugh Hamilton, James McIntosh, William M. Carr, Thomas Atkinson, David Sprowle, Andrew
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
xcluded from military camps Pope in Missouri Price's appeal to the Missourians, 181. activity of2. Halleck declares martial law in St. Louis Price driven out of Missouri, 183. Hunter's operatiemont's army that fell back from Springfield. Price was advancing. He had made a most stirring aping from the Missouri River and beyond to join Price. To prevent this combination was Pope's chiefissouri cavalry, under Major Hubbard, to watch Price, who was then at Osceola with about eight thoud pay the expenses. At about the same time General Price, who had found himself relieved from immedneral) Carr. On the same day they met some of Price's advance, and skirmishing ensued; and on the ed. This feint of offering battle was made by Price to enable him to effect a retreat. On the nigeen slain the previous evening, were found. Price retreated to Cassville, closely pursued by Curward movement of the National troops, Brigadier-General Price, son of the chief, was captured at Wa[3 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
ional troops in Arkansas Curtis in pursuit of Price, 250. gathering of Confederate forces Curtis Valley toward the Gulf. We have observed how Price was expelled from Missouri and driven into Arknclement weather and insufficient food. General Price, meanwhile, had been joined by Ben McCullo Earl Van Dorn. startling intelligence that Price and McCulloch had been joined by General Earl r Pike, about 4,000; and Missouri troops under Price, about 8,000. These were in and near Boston Mofifty miles from Pea Ridge, accompanied by Generals Price, McCulloch, McIntosh, and Pike. Informed other. It was to this strong position that General Price fled when he left Missouri, and from which from the main point of attack in their rear. Price occupied the main road not far from the Elkhorong the main road toward Keitsville, where General Price had been posted. He too had fled, and thesouri troops, or more gallant leaders than General Price and his officers. From the first to the l[6 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
ly arriving there, while General Buell was making easy marches across Tennessee, to the assistance of Grant, and great uncertainty existed as to the time when he might be expected. On the first of April, Johnston was informed that Van Dorn and Price were making their way toward Memphis from Central Arkansas, with thirty thousand troops, and would join him within a week. A day or two afterward he heard of the approach of Buell, and at once prepared for an advance upon Grant. His right, undet of Monterey, seven or eight miles from Corinth. Cautiously and silently they had moved still farther on, and halted near the intersection of the roads leading to Hamburg and Pittsburg Landing, and there it was resolved to wait for Van Dorn and Price. Yet there was peril in delay. If Buell should arrive, Johnston's golden opportunity might be lost. Becoming satisfied that evening that his forward movement was unknown to Grant, the chief commander called a council of war at eight, o'clock,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
eight thousand men. Beauregard prepared to meet Halleck. He too had been re-enforced, and his army was re-organized. Price and Van Dorn had arrived with a large body of Missouri and Arkansas troops; and General Mansfield Lovell, who had fled fr a little farther up the river. The Confederate fleet, It consisted of the General Van Dorn (Hollins's flagship), General Price, General Bragg, General Lovell, Little Rebel, Jeff. Thompson, Sumter, and General Beauregard. now commanded by Commod a severe naval battle. This was waged for a time between the gunboats, when two of the Confederate rams (Beauregard and Price) pushed swiftly forward to engage in the affray. The watchful Colonel Ellet saw this movement, and instantly took a posiay. The Queen dashed first at the Beauregard (which opened fire), and missed her, but was more successful in chasing the Price. She struck the wheel-house of that vessel with her iron prow, crushing it, and so damaging the hull that she was compell
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the Mississippi from Carthage, and to have gun-boats to cover the movement and the landing. Porter was ready for the attempt on the 16th of April. The gun-boats selected for the purpose were the Benton, Captain Green; Lafayette, Captain Walke; Price, Captain Woodworth; Louisville, Commander Owen; Carondelet, Lieutenant Murphy; Pittsburg, Lieutenant Hoel; Tuscumbia, Lieutenant Shirk; and Mound City, Lieutenant Wilson. All of these were iron-clad excepting the Price. They were laden with suppPrice. They were laden with supplies for the army below, and were well fortified against missiles from the batteries by various overlayings, such as iron chains, timbers, and bales of cotton and hay. The transports chosen for the ordeal were the Forest Queen, Henry Clay, and Silver Wave. These, too, were laden with supplies for the army, with their machinery protected by baled hay and cotton. It was arranged for the iron-clads to pass down after dark in single file, a few hundred yards apart, each engaging the batteries as i
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
uct during the action with Fort Morgan and the rebel rain and gun-boats. Feeling satisfied that Captain (afterwards Rear-Admiral) James Alden, U. S. N they have earned that justly-prized distinction, the medal of honor, I trust the Department will confer it upon them: J. Henry Dennig and Michael Hudson, Sergeants of Marines; Wm. M. Smith and Miles M. Oviatt, Corporals of Marines; Barnett Kenna, Quartermaster; Wm. Halsted, Coxswain; Joseph Brown, Quartermaster; Joseph Irlane, Seaman; Edward Price, Coxswain; Alexander Mack, Captain-of-Top; William Nichols, Quartermaster; Nicholas Irwin, Seaman; John Cooper, Coxswain; John Brown, Captain-of-Forecastle; John Irwin, Coxswain; William Blagden, Ship's Cook; William Madden, Coalheaver; James Machon, boy; William H. Brown, Lds.; James Mifflin, Engineer's Cook; James E. Sterling, Coalheaver; Richard Dennis Boatswain's Mate; Samuel W. Davis,--------, Samuel Todd, Quartermaster. Extract from report of Commander J. H. Strong, commanding
icularly meritorious. Joseph Brown (Quartermaster) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them, to replace men disabled at the guns. Edward Price, (Captain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge's breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the spongehead out. Alexander Mack, cularly meritorious. Joseph Brown, (Quartermaster,) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them to replace men disabled at the guns. Edward Price, (Coxswain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the sponge-head out. Alexander Mack,
1 2