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gro Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker — She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Stern. gro Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker — She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Ster
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], The danger of rebellion in the North! (search)
ion will not live to see the end of the war; and from its vast, extensive nature, covering an area of two-thirds of the soil of the United States, it will soon exhaust and ruin the country. Already great evil has been done by the proclamation of General Fremont in Missouri. We have the testimony of Rev. Mr. Olmstead, pastor of the Baptist Church as Booneville, in a letter in a Chicago Republican journal, that "the whole country in Northwestern Missouri is up and flocking by hundreds to Price's camp, their arms being of every description; that the whole force of the rebels marching from various points against the Union army will amount from 100,000 to 150,000 men;" and his opinion is that the only hope is to fall back, concentrate, entrench, and act on the defensive! Such are the first fruits in Missouri of the false step of Fremont towards making the war one of emancipation, instead of a war to restore the status quo ante bellum--the same condition as existed before hostilities
o fearful execution if only able to get in the right position. However, if St. Louis be attacked, the New Era would be found to be of immense utility. Yesterday all the commissioned officers who were captured at Lexington, with the exception of Col. Mulligan, reached this point under escort of Capt. Champion, of the Confederate service. They left there the day after I did, and bring no later intelligence from that point than that contained in my last letter. Some of them state that Gen. Price unearthed from the fortifications several hundred bombs, which had been buried there by his predecessors in treason, of whose existence the national troops were ignorant. Major Tanner died to-day of his wounds, and as I write, a military cortege, with reverse arms, and step in accord with the movements of a solemn dirge, is passing my window to do honor to his remains. A forward movement on the part of Fremont, in the direction of Lexington, is talked of for to- morrow. The whe
rs being thus transported; to allow no lumber to be used for tent floors, except upon the recommendation of the Medical Director for hospital purposes, and to prevent teamsters driving their teams faster than a walk. Important from Missouri--Price still moving Southward. Jefferson City, Tuesday, Oct. 8. --Colonel Matthews telegraphed to Gov. Gamble this morning from Hermann, Mo., that he has been compelled to surrender his camp, with three pieces of cannon, to a superior force of tn is to burn the Gasconade bridge in that vicinity. Reinforcements have been sent to Hermann and the bridge. On hearing of the approach of the rebel force, our troops began erecting palisades for its defence. At last accounts the army of Gen. Price was on Grand river, in Henry county. On Wednesday last he was marching Southward. Col. Matthews not surrendered. Jefferson City, Oct. 9. --The surrender of a Federal camp near Hermann, which was reported this morning, proved not t
A rumor from Missouri, &c. Louisville, Oct. 12. --A special dispatch to the St. Louis Democrat, dated Jefferson City, Oct. 6th, says that little doubt is entertained at Jefferson City that Gen. Price is on his way South with the main body of his army. The horse of Col. Lyon, of the 8th Regiment, fell through the trestle work of the Tennessee bridge on yesterday, and Col. Lyon was killed.
gro, Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis, on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here, or if lodged in jail in the county or city. Joseph Stern. oc 7--1m* gro, Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis, on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here, or if lodged in jail in the county or city. Joseph Stern. oc 7--1m*
rests of his country. The Administration will do well to beware. It is trifling with the feelings of the West in a manner that will prove disastrous, unless more of a disposition is manifested to consult their wishes and opinions. If Fremont is called to Washington, and defeat overtakes our troops in Northwestern Missouri, it will be hard for it to shift the responsibility from its own to Fremont's shoulders. If, on the contrary, our brave soldiers meet and overpower the rebels under Price, our people are very certain to assume that the success is due to the energy and sagacious foresight of Gen. Fremont. Thus, let the contest in Missouri terminate as it may, the sympathies of the people are with him whom they conceive to be a persecuted and slandered, but still efficient, officer. Charges have been preferred. The Administration has had opportunities of ascertaining the truth or falsity of these charges. The summoning of Fremont from his command to Washington undoubtedly i
Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four Inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis, on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here. or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Stern. Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four Inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis, on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here. or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Stern.
gro Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Stern. gro Woman, named Betty; about 28 years old, five feet four inches high, black, who was hired to Joseph Davis on Broad street. She has a mark on the face, in consequence of a mustard plaster she had on, which place is darker.--She has children in Cumberland county, where I bought her of Mr. J. M. Price. She is probably in this city, or has made her way to Mr. Price's. I will give the above reward, if delivered to me here or if lodged in jail in the county or city. oc 7--1m* Joseph Stern.
er, we shall probably soon hear that Missouri is won or lost. We believe the rebels have now collected in and around Lexington the strongest army that they will be able this year to concentrate in Missouri, and that the defeat of this will drive them from the State. A correspondent of The Times, who witnessed, (under guard.) the conclusion of the siege of Col. Mulligan's position, expressly says: "All the big guns of the Confederates were there. I saw, among others, Generals Slack, Price, Parsons, Rains, Hardes, Gov. Jackson, Gens. Harris, (Martin) Green, McGoffin, Captain Emmet McDonald, Cols. Turner, Payne, and Clay, and so on, ad infinituns. " This leaves only Ben McCulloch's Arkansas ruffians to be accounted for, and they can hardly exceed ten thousand. The capture of Mulligan's force has doubtless given prestige to the rebels, and thus brought some thousands to their standard, while it has supplied them with some valuable, and more indifferent arms. Lexington is
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