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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
Dahlgren; Acting-Ensigns, A. S. Leighton, F. P. B. Sands, F. A. Gross, M. C. Keith and Charles Miller; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. S. Eddy; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R. H. Gillette; Acting-Master's Mate, H. J. Derbyshire and T. H. P. Gross; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistants, G. S. Perkins, J. M. Case, E. C. Maloy and A. J. Pixley; Acting-Third-Assistants, E. B. Carter and J. W. Homans. *Malvern--Fourth-rate (Flag-ship) Lieutenant, B. H. Porter: Acting-Masters, J. A. Hamilton and John Price; Acting-Ensigns, Geo. Leonard, John Hill and G. E. Kidder; Acting Master's Mates, W. F. Horton, Henry Gardiner, A. M. Lyon and W. D. Cobb, Jr.; Assistant Surgeon, J. S. Ramsey; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. B. Poor; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, W. E. Moore; Acting-Second-Assistants, J. J. Ashmen and F, J. Hadley; Third-Assistant, Owen Jones; Acting-Third-Assistants, Edwin Bond, A. H. Perry and William Finn; Sub-Assistant J. S. Bradford, U. S. Coast Survey. *Alabama--Third-rate.
e train was rushed to the public square and placed under a strong guard, while the troops went out to Owens' farm--one mile and a half from Springfield — and formed in line of battle, resting on their arms over night. One informant states that John Price started northward with five hundred men, but was driven back, having encountered a Sawyer. A report was put in circulation for the public use, that Fremont was retreating to Jefferson City. But despatches were received by the secession authorities, Wednesday evening, that Price was to cross the Osage, at Papinsville, the previous day, Tuesday. It was given out that the reason for this retrograde movement was to get a supply of provisions. It was observed that several prominent secessionists about Springfield were busily engaged in packing up for a start. Captain Galloway, commander of the Home Guards in Taney County, despairing of the arrival of Federal troops, disbanded his company. He was hunted through the woods by the rebel
enth street, the Yankees and negroes were wheeled to the left, and conducted to the Libby prison, while the mules were sent to stables in another direction. On their arrival at the Libby prison there were found to be one hundred and forty-five Yankees and sixteen negroes. We give the names of the officers, together with their rank and the place of their capture. They were all taken on Friday, the thirteenth instant; Capt. James Magrath, company G, of the Forty-second New-York, and Lieut. John Price, of the Forty-second New-York, were captured at Tunstall's station, on the York River Railroad; Lieut. H. B. Masters, of the Fifty-fifth New-York, at the White House; and Lieut. Charles B. Davis, Sixth United States regular cavalry, Lieut. Wm. McLean, company H, Fifth United States regular cavalry, and Assistant-Surgeon Adam Trau, Fifth United States regular cavalry, at Old Church, Hanover. There were about twenty regulars among the privates, the balance being members of the Forty-sec
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
Incorporated May 14, 1645. Population in 1860, 1,698; in 1865, 1,643. Valuation in 1860, $787,045; in 1865, $766,383. The selectmen in 1861 were John Lee, John Price, Aaron Bennett; in 1862, John Price, Aaron Bennett, Albert E. Low; in 1863, John Price, Aaron Bennett, George F. Allen; in 1864, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett,John Price, Aaron Bennett, Albert E. Low; in 1863, John Price, Aaron Bennett, George F. Allen; in 1864, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, George F. Rust; in 1865, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, Albion Gilman. The town-clerk in 1861 was John Lee; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, George F. Allen. The town-treasurer during all these years was Albert E. Low. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon questions relating to the war, was held on the 1st of May,John Price, Aaron Bennett, George F. Allen; in 1864, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, George F. Rust; in 1865, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, Albion Gilman. The town-clerk in 1861 was John Lee; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, George F. Allen. The town-treasurer during all these years was Albert E. Low. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon questions relating to the war, was held on the 1st of May, at which Albert W. Jewett, Albert E. Low, and Samuel Crowell were appointed to ascertain the wants of the families of soldiers who have enlisted or may enlist in the service of their country, and to make proper provision for them; and for that purpose fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated, which the treasurer was authorized t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Schouler's history of Massachusetts in the civil war. Two volumes. (search)
State records and correspondence. It is the complete history of Governor Andrew's public career. Vol. II., published in the fall of 1871, is devoted to the work of the different towns and cities of this Commonwealth. It is made up from new and valuable materials. This work has been very favorably noticed by the press, and flattering testimonials were received from President Grant, General Sherman, the Massachusetts Senators, Hon. E. R. Hoar, late Attorney-General, and many others. Price of each volume, five dollars. The two volumes may now be obtained, as a set, for eight dollars. Extra bindings, in sheep or Turkey morocco, will be supplied on order at cost price. Each volume is complete in itself. Published by the author, and sold by subscription only. Copies sent free of charge, by mail or express, to any address, on receipt of the subscription price. All orders for either volume should be addressed as follows: William Schouler, 39 Kilby street, Boston, Mass.
under command of Col. William K. Patterson, Lieutenant-Colonel Crouch and Maj. John Price, with Surgeon L. H. Dickson, Asst. Surgeon Gee, Quartermaster Tom Watson. was exchanged, the Ninth subsequently engaged in the battles and skirmishes of Price's raid in Missouri, in October, 1864. The Eleventh Arkansas infantry was orgton county, where it remained in winter quarters until February, 1862, when General Price and his army of Missouri fell back before a large force of Federals under Gavern in Benton county. On the 4th of March, the regiment marched to reinforce Price, forming part of Hebert's brigade, under command of Gen. Ben McCulloch, and tooayou, consisting of Missouri and Arkansas regiments, were transferred under Generals Price and Van Dorn across the Mississippi river in April, 1862. The Sixteenth wat was held to duty in the vicinity of Memphis and joined the combined forces of Price and Van Dorn in north Mississippi. It participated with credit in the battle o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
eir homes and followed the Southern flag, and cast their lot with the Southern cause. They were patriots worthy of their names, and a roll of them should be preserved. There were six Englishmen, whose names I have been unable to get, who also deserve especial mention at my hands for similar service. Harpers Ferry men. James Merrick, John Hewett, Otho Hewett, William Martin, William Copeland, Philip Schavman, William Nicholson, Tollect Duke, Louis Keyser, Joe Keyser, John Schilling, John Price, Timothy Harrington, Philip Burkhart, Joe Burkhart, McCloud Lewis, Jessie Graham, John Cord, Levi Decker, Thomas Boswell, Joe Boswell, V. Talley, J. E. P. Daingerfield, Jacob Sponcellor, Richard Clowe, Hamson Clowe, John Claspy, William Hewitt, and George W. Decker. Sergeant Stephens deserves special mention at my hands. He was an old United States sergeant, and joined the Southern army at great peril. He was one of the most methodical and accurate accountants I ever knew—wrote a beau