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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
er, William Dagan, J. R. Hetherington, Nelson Drake, Charles A. Hesser, Samuel Shoener, Charles Maurer, James S. Sillyman, Henry Brobst, Alfred Huntzinger, Wm. Alspach, John Hoffa, J. F. Barth, William Cole, David Williams, George Rice, Joseph Kear, Charles E. Beck, F. B. Hammer, Peter H. Frailey, Thomas Corby, Charles Vanhorn, John Noble, Joseph Fyant, Alexander S. Bowen, John Jones, Francis A. Stitzer, William A. Maize, William Agin, George H. Hartman, Richard Bartolet, Lewis Douglass, Richard Price, Frederick Christ, Valentine Stichter, Francis B. Bannan, William Bartholomew, Frank P. Myer, Bernard Riley, George F. Stahlen, Edward Gaynor. Musicians. Thomas Severn, Fifer; Albert F. Bowen, Drummer. National Light Infantry, of Pottsville. officers and non-commissioned officers.--Captain, E. McDonald; First Lieutenant, James Russell; Second Lieutenant, Henry L. Cake; Third Lieutenant, Lewis J. Martin; First Sergeant, La Mar S. Hay; Second Sergeant, Abraham McIntyre; Th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
ghosts and kidnappers might come and carry me off. The belief that the darkness was infested by evil agencies and ferocious visitants hostile to little boys I owe to Sarah's silly garrulity at Castle Row. I am under the impression that during the day, for a portion of this period, I was sent to an infant's school, where there was a terrible old lady who is associated in my mind with spectacles and a birch rod; but I have no particular incident connected with it to make it definite. Richard Price and his wife Jenny seem to have, at last, become dismayed at my increasing appetite, and to have demanded a higher rate for my maintenance. As both my uncles had in the mean time married, and through the influence of their wives declined to be at further charge for me, the old couple resolved to send me to the Workhouse. Consequently Dick Price, the son, took me by the hand one day, Saturday, February 20th, 1847, and, under the pretence that we were going to Aunt Mary at Fynnon Beuno,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Price, Richard 1723-1791 (search)
Price, Richard 1723-1791 Clergyman; born in Tynton, Glamorganshire, Wales, Feb. 23, 1723; was a dissenting minister, connected with churches at Stoke-Newington and Hackney, as pastor and preacher, from 1743 until a short time before his death. He wrote much on morals, politics, and political and social economy. His Appeal on the subject of the National debt is said to have been the foundation of Pitt's sinking-fund scheme. In 1776 he published Observations on Civil liberty and the justice and policy of the War with America. It was a powerful plea for justice and right, and 60,000 copies were distributed. The corporation of London gave him a vote of thanks and the freedom of the city; and in 1778 the American Congress invited him to become a citizen of the United States, and to aid them in the management of their finances, promising him a liberal remuneration. In 1783 Yale College conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D., and in 1784 he published Observations on the im
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
ns strike such deep root that he considers establishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers o Countries, visited the principal cities of England and Scotland, received honorary degrees from the universities, and enjoyed the society of Collinson, Priestley, Price, Hume, Adam Smith, Robertson, and Kames. He returned to America in the latter part of 1762. In 1763 he made a 1600-mile tour of the northern provinces to inspecthe positive and negative dogmas of the religion civil formulated by Rousseau in the Contrat social. In his later years he was in sympathetic relations with Paine, Price, and Priestley. He was, however, of a fortunately earlier generation than these English heretics, and certain other circumstances enabled him to keep the temper o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
constitutions of government of the United States of America. This work, written and first published in London, was occasioned, the author states, by Turgot's sweeping attack upon the American theory of government, contained in a letter to Dr. Richard Price, in 1778, and published by Price in his Observations on the importance of the American Revolution, and the means of making it a benefit to the world (1785). Two additional volumes appeared in 1788. Works, IV, v. The prominence of the autPrice in his Observations on the importance of the American Revolution, and the means of making it a benefit to the world (1785). Two additional volumes appeared in 1788. Works, IV, v. The prominence of the author gave the work, especially the first volume, some vogue; but the disorderly arrangement, the verbose and careless style, the many glaring inaccuracies and inconsistencies due to hasty writing and negligent proofreading, a political philosophy nowhere profound, and the characteristic temper of the advocate rather than of the expositor, did Adams no credit; while his frank criticisms of some features of American government opened the way for attacks upon his sincerity and loyalty which followe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 165, 169, 170, 174, 175, 176, 179, 263 Port Folio, 180, 234, 237 n. Porteus, Bishop, 263 Pory, John, 14 Postl, Karl Anton, see Sealsfield, Charles Potowatomy's land, 2 Power, Tyrone, 189 Power of fancy, the, 181 Power of sympathy, the, 285, 307 Powers of genius, 165 Prairie, the, 208, 297, 299-300, 319 Prairies, the, 212 Precaution, 294 Preface to the speech of Joseph Galloway, 98 Prelude, the, 197, 213 Prescott, 277, 309 Price, Richard, 91, 97, 102, 147 Priestley, 91, 97, 99, 102 Prime, Dr., Benjamin Young, 168 Prince, Rev. Thomas, 20, 27-28, 113 Prince of Parthia, the, 216, 217, 225, 232 Prince Society, 28 Principles (Bishop Berkeley), 58 Prior, 112, 116, 175, 176, 177, 178, x80 Probus, 324 Procter, Bryan Waller (Barry Cornwall), 243 Progress of Dullness, 172 Prompter, 233 Prose (of Bryant), 277 n., 282 n. Prose sketches and poems, 319 Providence gazette, 128 Publications of t
a young hart over the mountains. From the east side, so many volunteered that he could pick his men; and with light step and dauntless spirit they marched to the siege of Boston. Cresap moved among them as their friend and father; but he was Chap. XLIV.} 1775. Aug. not destined to take a further part in the war. Driven by desperate illness from Washington's camp, he died on his way home at New York, where he was buried with honor as a martyr. The second Maryland company was commanded by Price, whose lieutenant was Otho Holland Williams. Of the eight companies from Pennsylvania, William Thompson was colonel. The second in command was Edward Hand, a native of Ireland, who had come over as a surgeon's mate. One of the captains was Hendricks, long remembered for his stateliness of person, his mild and beautiful countenance, and his heroic soul. The alacrity with which these troops were raised, showed that the public mind heaved like the sea from New England to the Ohio and be
s, which Lord North did not regard as a public benefit, but rather as a species of luxury that ought to be taxed. Debate in the house of commons brought no result: Fox, who joined calmness of temperament to sweetness of disposition, and, as his powers unfolded themselves, gave evidence of a genial sagacity that saw beyond parliamentary strife the reality of general principles, vainly struggled to keep up the courage of his political friends. A pamphlet, written with masterly ability by Richard Price, on liberty, which he defined to be a government of laws made by common consent, won for its Chap. LXIII.} 1776. May. author the freedom of the city of London, and was widely circulated through the kingdom, and the continent of Europe, especially Germany. His masterly plea for America was unavailing; but his tract gained peculiar importance from his applying to the actual condition of the representation of his own country, the principle on which America justified her resistance. The
eloved nor respected, and truly stood neither for the people nor for any party of the aristocracy; neither for the spirit of the time, nor for the past age, nor for that which was coming. It was a conglomerate of inferior and heterogeneous materials, totally unfit to guide the policy of a mighty empire, endured only during an interim. The period in British history was one of great and Chap. I.} 1778. increasing intellectual vigor. It was distinguished in philosophy by Hume and Reid and Price and Adam Smith; in painting by Reynolds; in poetry and various learning by Gray and Goldsmith, Johnson and Cowper; in legislative eloquence by Chatham, Burke, and Fox; in history by Gibbon; in the useful arts by Brindley, Watt, and Arkwright. That the nation, in a state of high and advancing culture, should have been governed by a sordid ministry, so inferior to itself as that of Lord North, was not due to the corruption of parliament alone; for there was always in the house of commons an i
of the loan offices were also used in great amounts in payment of debts to the separate states, especially to Pennsylvania. The legalized use of paper money spread its neverfailing blight. Trade became a game of hazard. Unscrupulous debtors discharged contracts of long standing in bills, worth perhaps but a twentieth of their nominal value. The unwary ran in debt, while cunning creditors waited for payment till the continental bills should cease to be a legal tender. The name of Richard Price was dear to every lover of political freedom. He derived his theory of morals from eternal and immutable principles, and his essay on liberty, which was read in Great Britain, America, and through a translation in Germany, founded the rights of man on the reality of truth and justice. He had devised a scheme for the payment of the British debt. Congress, on the sixth of October, in- Oct. 6. vited him to become their fellow-citizen, and to regulate their finances. The invitation was
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