Your search returned 171 results in 48 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
y sixteen per cent. died during the eighteen months Rock Island was used as a prison. This number (1,945) includes those who were killed by the sentinels — the killed not being classified by the provost marshal. The number released (1,386) includes those who having offered to join the United States navy or army were rejected by the surgeons as physically disqualified. More than fifty per cent. of the released were of this class. The balance were principally Missourians, captured during Price's last raid. These claimed to be Union men, and having proved their loyalty to the satisfaction of the Secretary of War, were released by his order. The prisoners transferred were officers originally brought to Rock Island, but afterwards sent to Johnson's Island or other military prisons. In April, 1864, the sentinels on the parapet commenced firing at the prisoners and into the barracks, and this practice continued while I remained. I am ignorant as to the orders the sentinels receiv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
me. On one of these occasions we struck a force under General Pope, at Farmington, which withdrew without giving serious battle. On May 30, Beauregard completed in a masterly manner his evacuation of Corinth. We marched always ready for battle, but were never attacked nor closely followed. We marched about twelve miles per day 'till we reached Tupelo, where Beauregard halted the army in order of battle, and remained unmolested 'till August, when Bragg moved his army to Chattanooga, and Price, in September, moved the Army of the West to Iuka. The author overestimates the Confederate army at Chickamauga. General Bragg stated his loss in killed and wounded at 18,000 men, and as two-fifths of his whole army, which was less than 50,000 of all arms. Bragg had no reserves, but fought his whole army, including Forest's cavalry, which, to the number of about 6,000, fought on foot. The battle of Chickamauga was the fiercest of the war. Rosecranz fought stubbornly, as he always di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of a narrative received of Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton, touching the Origin of the war. (search)
an end, and dismissed Colonel Baldwin, without promising anything more definite. In order to confirm the accuracy of my own memory, I have submitted the above narrative to the Honorable A. H. H. Stuart, Colonel Baldwin's neighbor and political associate, and the only surviving member of the commission soon after sent from the Virginia Convention to Washington. In a letter to me, he says: When Colonel Baldwin returned to Richmond, he reported to the four gentlemen above named, and to Mr. Samuel Price, of Greenbrier, the substance of his interview with Lincoln substantially as he stated it to you. I asked Colonel Baldwin what was the explanation of this remarkable scene, and especially of Lincoln's perplexity. He replied that the explanation had always appeared to him to be this: When the seven Gulf States had actually seceded, the Lincoln faction were greatly surprised and in great uncertainty what to do; for they had been blind enough to suppose that all Southern opposition to
d — Anslum E. Wiley. Supposed to be killed — Asa Winters. Wounded--Capt. Wilmington Wingett, slightly, paroled; Lieut. Wm. Mount, slightly, paroled; Sergt. Preston Cates, slightly, paroled; Sergt. Samuel Finch, slightly, escaped; Joel Combs, severely; Christopher Gibson, mortally; Jasper Havenridge, Joseph Kuhn, David McQuinney, Isaac Shafer, wounded and missing; Leander Ward. Missing — Bowers A. Abbott, Benj. R. Gray, Anthony Gavin, Henry L. Jones, Wm. L. Muchmore, Thos. Murphy, Samuel Price, Willis Stanton, Homer Stanton, Allen C. White, Geo. Ward. Paroled prisoners--Sergeant David M. Little; Corporals Wm. C. Morrison, John Cates, Benj. R. Hinchman, Robert Dare, Aloys Gyer; wagoner Benjamin F. Hughes; privates Charles H. Alvey, Samuel B. Bond, Peter R. Brown, Barnett Bright, John Barker, Wm. Clark, Elpathan K. Corey, Jacob B. Ferris, Benj. F. Herbert, John K. Harris, Samuel J. Hamrick, Wm. H. Johnson, Griffith C. Pentecost, John H. Rose, George F. Sample, Elzy Swain, Wm. <
d — Anslum E. Wiley. Supposed to be killed — Asa Winters. Wounded--Capt. Wilmington Wingett, slightly, paroled; Lieut. Wm. Mount, slightly, paroled; Sergt. Preston Cates, slightly, paroled; Sergt. Samuel Finch, slightly, escaped; Joel Combs, severely; Christopher Gibson, mortally; Jasper Havenridge, Joseph Kuhn, David McQuinney, Isaac Shafer, wounded and missing; Leander Ward. Missing — Bowers A. Abbott, Benj. R. Gray, Anthony Gavin, Henry L. Jones, Wm. L. Muchmore, Thos. Murphy, Samuel Price, Willis Stanton, Homer Stanton, Allen C. White, Geo. Ward. Paroled prisoners--Sergeant David M. Little; Corporals Wm. C. Morrison, John Cates, Benj. R. Hinchman, Robert Dare, Aloys Gyer; wagoner Benjamin F. Hughes; privates Charles H. Alvey, Samuel B. Bond, Peter R. Brown, Barnett Bright, John Barker, Wm. Clark, Elpathan K. Corey, Jacob B. Ferris, Benj. F. Herbert, John K. Harris, Samuel J. Hamrick, Wm. H. Johnson, Griffith C. Pentecost, John H. Rose, George F. Sample, Elzy Swain, Wm. <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of West Virgina, (search)
2,794; in 1900, 958,800. See United States, West Virginia, in vol. IX.; Virginia. State governors. Arthur I. Boremaninaugurated1863 William E. Stevensoninaugurated1869 John J. Jacobinaugurated1871 Henry M. Matthewsinaugurated1877 Jacob B. Jacksoninaugurated1881 E. Willis Wilsoninaugurated1885 A. B. Fleminginaugurated1890 William A. MacCorkleinaugurated1893 George W. Atkinsoninaugurated1897 Albert B. Whiteinaugurated1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Waitman T. Willey38th to 42d1863 to 1871 Peter G. Van Winkle38th to 41st1863 to 1869 Arthur I. Boreman41st to 44th1869 to 1875 Henry G. Davis42d to 48th1871 to 1883 Allen T. Caperton44th1875 to 1876 Samuel Price44th1876 Frank Hereford44th to 47th1877 to 1881 Johnson N. Camden47th to 50th1881 to 1887 John E. Kenna48th to 52d1883 to 1893 Charles E. Faulkner50th to 56th1887 to 1899 Johnson N. Canden53d to 54th1893 to 1895 Stephen B. Elkins54th to —1895 to — Nathan B. Scott56th to —189
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson's Creek, battle of. (search)
s impressed by the result of the battle with the opinion that Lyon's troops outnumbered the Confederates in that region. Price thought not, and favored an immediate advance upon them. McCulloch would not consent; but, receiving an order from General Polk, Aug. 4, 1861, to march against Lyon, he consented to join his forces with those of Price in attacking Lyon on condition of his (the Texan) having the chief command. Price, anxious to drive the Nationals out of Missouri, consented. McCulloPrice, anxious to drive the Nationals out of Missouri, consented. McCulloch divided the Confederate forces into three columns, and at midnight, Aug. 7, their whole army, 20,000 strong, moved towards Springfield under McCulloch, Pearce, and Price. They encamped, on the 9th, near Wilson's Creek, 10 miles south of SpringfPrice. They encamped, on the 9th, near Wilson's Creek, 10 miles south of Springfield, wearied and half-famished, for they had received only half-rations for ten days, and had eaten nothing for twenty-four hours. Lyon's force was so small that there seemed great risk in accepting battle, but he feared a retreat would be more d
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
istering angel, pointing to heaven and leading the way. Recently his aged companion was removed from earth to heaven; but, though greatly crushed in spirit, he falters not in his devotion to the great cause to which his life has been given. Mr. Samuel Price, of Greenbrier, so well known in Eastern as well as Western Virginia, and a Presbyterian, pays Brother Margrave a handsome tribute in a private letter just received. I desire to say, writes Mr. Price, that he has been indefatigable in his lMr. Price, that he has been indefatigable in his labors, in visiting the sick, attending the camps, distributing tracts, etc.; and, indeed, in doing everything that an industrious, pious Christian minister could do. We should feel his loss in this section most seriously. It would be positively irreparable. He is the most efficient colporter that I remember ever to have known. What an example have we here for those who have a heart to do good in the colportage work! If one will only continue at these labors, instead of growing weary of them
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
s. Ninth Georgia. H. Allen Tupper; J. C. Byrnham; A. B. Campbell. Eleventh Georgia. W. A. Simmons. Fifty-ninth Georgia. Benning's Brigade. Fifteenth Georgia. W. F. Robertson. Second Georgia. Seventeenth Georgia. Rev. Mr. Hudson. Twentieth Georgia. Gregg's Brigade. First Texas. I. R. Vick. Fourth Texas. Fifth Texas. Third Arkansas. G. E. Butler. Law's Brigade. Fourth Alabama. Robt. Frazier. Fifteenth Alabama. Forty-fourth Alabama. W. G. Perry. Forty-eighth Alabama. Rev. Mr. Price. Pickett's Division Steuart's Brigade. Ninth Virginia. J. W. Walkup; G. W. Easter. Thirty-eighth Virginia. R. W. Cridlin; Rev. Mr. Cosby. Fifty-third Virginia. W. S. Penick; P. H. Fontaine; Rev. Mr. Colton Fifty-seventh Virginia. J. E. Joyner. Fourteenth Virginia. Rev. Mr. Crocker. Terry's Brigade. First Virginia. Rev. Mr. Oldrich. Third Virginia. Rev. Mr. Hammond; J. W. Ward. Seventh Virginia. John H. Bocock; F. McCarthy; Rev. Mr. Frayser. Eleventh Virginia. John C
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
General Lee's army in Virginia. Rev. Dr. Kavanaugh was sent to the army of General Price, and Rev. Mr. Marvin (now Bishop) was directed by Bishop Pierce to take pose and death. Rev. Dr. B. T. Kavanaugh, one of the most efficient laborers in Price's command, wrote to Dr. W. W. Bennett the following account of the revivals in h sides of the Mississippi: Among those who came out of Missouri with General Price's army were John R. Bennett (your brother), W. M. Patterson, Nathaniel M. Tnd ministry was in the State of Mississippi, to which State I had followed General Price's army, while we were encamped near Tupelo. Here we kept up nightly meetinummer. I requested Bishop Paine to give me a commission as a missionary to General Price's army, which was then in Arkansas. I obtained it, and left the house of Rssing the Mississippi just below Bolivar, swimming my horse, and arrived in General Price's camp early in October. My first work was to organize all the chaplains
1 2 3 4 5