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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

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sh by desperate leaders, whose only safety lies in success. Such a foe ought never to conquer freemen battling upon their own soil. You will encounter him in your chosen position, strong by nature and improved by art — away from his main support and reliance — gun-boats and heavy batteries — and, for the first time in this war, with nearly equal numbers. The slight reverses we have met on the sea-board have worked us good as well as evil; the brave troops so long retained there have hastened to swell your numbers, while the gallant Van Dorn and invincible Price, with the ever-successful Army of the West, are now in your midst, with numbers almost equalling the Army of Shiloh. We have, then, but to strike and destroy, and as the enemy's whole resources are concentrated here, we shall not only redeem Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri at one blow, but open the portals of the whole North-west. Braxton Bragg, General Commanding Second Corps. G. C. Garner, Assist. Adjt.-Gene
If it fails to gain victory, it will be difficult to imagine any troops we possess capable of succeeding. Richmond Dispatch account. Corinth, Miss., May 10. Hurrying forward to the scene, I found that our right wing, under command of Price and Van Dorn and Sturgis, had advanced beyond our intrenchments to Farmington, and were engaging the enemy advantageously. To convey a more perfect idea of the affair, I should observe that on Thursday night Van Dorn had placed himself so neardiscomfited, and no more was an attempt made by any portion of the Federal army to leave their covert. Our troops, meanwhile, occupied the open field, and wherever an opportunity presented, poured a heavy fire into the ranks of the enemy. Gen. Price had been ordered early in the day to make a detour on our extreme right, so as to get in the rear of the Federals, and entirely surround them. But, owing to the distance around, or the suddenness of the attack by Van Dorn, he was not in positi
town. In the camps immediately around the town, there were few evidences of hasty retreat, but on the right-flank where Price and Van Dorn were encamped, the destruction of baggage and stores was very great, showing precipitate flight. Portions o is in advance, and has crossed Tennessee River. Gen. Thomas's army moved by way of Farmington, and is to-day encamped in Price and Van Dorn's late positions. It seems that it was the slow and careful approach of Gen. Halleck which caused the retr to that employed in our own army. The wires, however, were all cut, and the instruments taken away. The quarters of Price, Van Dorn, Hardee, Pillow and Bragg were pointed out by citizens, who stated that each of these notabilities commanded a he called a council of war on Tuesday evening, and announced his determination to evacuate Corinth. I learn that Pillow, Price and Hardee concurred with him, and that Bragg and Van Dorn opposed the movement, as absolutely destructive of the cause.
of seven vessels of the rebel fleet, as follows: General Beauregard, blown up and burnt; General Sterling Price, one wheel carried away; Jeff. Thompson, set on fire by shell, burned, and magazine blowbandoned by her crew. She burnt to the water's edge and blew up by her magazine. The General Price was also run on the Arkansas shore. She had come in contact with one of the rams of her own parhout our fleet. In the mean time, the rebel fleet, comprising the Gen. Van Dorn, (flag-ship,) Gen. Price, Gen. Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, Gen. Lovell, Gen. Beauregard, Sumter, and Little Rebel, all rams,latter. The shots from our gunboats tell with disastrous effect on the enemy's boats. The Gen. Price makes for the Arkansas shore, and, careening, sinks nearly out of sight. The Gen. Lovell now rey. The confederate fleet consisted of the following boats: General Van Dorn, (flag-ship,) General Price, General Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, General Lovell, General Beauregard, Sumter, and Little Rebel
egiment Illinois cavalry. I must particularly recommend to your notice the conduct of Major Humphrey, Captains Cameron, Cowan, Blakemore and Perkins; Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith, and First Sergeant Clark, of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, and Capt. Williams, Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's cavalry battalion. My thanks are due to Surgeon Jas. A. Brackett, for his care of the wounded, and to Battalion-Adjutant Blackburne, Quartermaster Price, and Sergeant-Major George A. Price, Ninth Illinois cavalry. The enemy lost twenty-eight in killed, wounded and prisoners. Private Futrell, of Hooker's company, one of the prisoners, is mortally wounded. Capt. Shuttleworth, in command of Hooker's, is also wounded. My loss was one taken prisoner by the enemy and twelve wounded, all of them of company K, Ninth Illinois cavalry. I am, very respectfully, etc., Albert G. Brackett, Colonel Ninth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding.
early as the tenth day of September, that Sterling Price was marching with a greatly superior forcening at four o'clock A. M., toward Iuka, where Price had concentrated his forces. At the appointednd Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part Chief U. S.A.: yesterday, the rebels under Price, Van Dorn, and Lovell were repulsed from theirs which followed the battles of Iuka were that Price had marched to the vicinity of Ripley, and wash inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. The enemy chose his own time awn perplexed officers were vexed with him. But Price was also moving. By placing your map before yDumas, his force being twenty thousand strong; Price's constituting the left wing, and Lovell's sma Gen. Rosecrans thought it well enough to get Price in deeply. A rebel soldier says Van Dorn sat lished, or a terrible failure to be recorded. Price had comparatively plain sailing, and lost no t[37 more...]
om the effects of the smoke and heat, we pushed through the creek below the bridge, and continued the pursuit. In a few minutes we overtook a small party, one of whom stated that the gun he was carrying was private property, and belonged to Major-Gen. Price, who had given it to him not more than fifteen minutes before. As fast as we collected a batch of eight or ten prisoners, they were sent back to General Pope, leaving us free, and we pushed on still more rapidly. A rattling, faint but decinemy were scattered in small parties of from ten to fifty, and ran at the sight of horse-men. Every moment the number became larger, and a piece of artillery, if not two, were almost within our grasp. From the best information I could obtain, Gen. Price was not far off. It was perfectly reasonable to expect that our forces were within call, and I supposed (up to the time I returned to the cavalry and found it drawn up on the hill) that they were immediately in the rear and coming on. By drivin
ted them taking the active part they desired. Price's force was about fifteen thousand. U. S. Gra us from cutting off the retreat and capturing Price and his army, only shows how much success depesame time, General Rosecrans became aware that Price had occupied Iuka in force, and was endeavorinnd Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part ould move on the Fulton road, and cut off his (Price's) retreat in case he should attempt it. With g imparted to the Captain the information that Price had evacuated the town during the night and eah troops could not have cut off the retreat of Price, they could at least have pursued them to a bee capture on the fourth, by the army under General Price. I believe I was a little congratulatory planted a battery sufficiently near to shell Gen. Price's headquarters, and were cracking away at th aim, as we judged, at the headquarters of General Price, but the old hero was not at home, but on [12 more...]
ral-in Chief U. S.A.: yesterday, the rebels under Price, Van Dorn, and Lovell were repulsed from their attac rumors which followed the battles of Iuka were that Price had marched to the vicinity of Ripley, and was beinguster in Northern Mississippi, Van Dorn commanding, (Price's army, Van Dorn's army, Villipigue, and the remnantcompanying sub-reports. I will only add that when Price's left bore down on our centre in gallant style, theampede. Riddled and scattered, the ragged head of Price's right storming columns advanced to near the house d rebel force of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, Villipigue and Rust in person, numbering, aerve, attacked you. They were commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Villipigue, Rust, Armstrong, Maury, and others, in ned with my command in the pursuit of Van Dorn's and Price's armies; marched sixteen miles, and bivouacked neard fifth inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. The enemy chose his own time and pla
those brave and tried men under the much-loved Price. You will remember that the junction of the two divisions under Gens. Lovell and Price took place at Ripley, on the twenty-eighth ultimo, and of operations for the next day was as follows: Price, on the left, was to commence a furious cannoning that every thing was going on as well with Price as with himself, moved forward, and the fight us in force, had thrown a heavy column against Price's right and centre. It was this sound of muskl Van Dorn for a brigade to be sent to support Price's right. The gallant Villepigue was immediateurned the bridge. Whilst this was going on, Price's division had reached Davis's Bridge, over thd in the rear. Ville-pigue was thrown between Price's force and Ord, whilst Rust was directed to go forward with Gen. Price, and assist in checking the enemy, should he attempt to go up the left banuit. Lovell's division overtook the forces of Price again at Hickory Flats, about eighteen miles f[9 more...]
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