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The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Missouri campaign of 1864-report of General Stirling Price. (search)
The Missouri campaign of 1864-report of General Stirling Price. [We have been very anxious to publish reports of the campaign in the Trans-Mississippi department, and are glad to be able to give the following report of General Price's operations in 1864, which was not published by the Confederate Government. It will be read General Price's operations in 1864, which was not published by the Confederate Government. It will be read with great interest not only by those who served with that gallant army but by all who desire to know the truth concerning this important campaign ] Shreveport, La. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — I have the honor to make the following report of my operations in the late expedition to Missouri. I regt could I have remained in Missouri this winter the army would have increased fifty thousand men. My thanks are due Lieutenant-Colonel Bull, my Provest Marshal-General, for the able, energetic and efficient discharge of his duties. I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant, Stirling Price, Major-General Commanding.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
o the general scope and bearing of the biographical sketches given in the book— eleven very tame sketches of Confederates, and twenty-six sketches of Federals, most of the latter glowing eulogies. It will not do to say that the sketches are chiefly of Generals commanding armies, for many of the Federals sketched would not come under this head, while a number of Confederates who commanded armies, such as John B. Floyd, Henry A. Wise. J. A. Early, John B. Hood, S. D. Lee, Leonidas Polk, Stirling Price, Earl Van Dorn, Kirby Smith, Dick Taylor, Hardee, &c., are omitted. The truth is the Confederates largely outnumbered the Federals in men worthy of places in general history, and for Southern schools it is unpardonable to omit such names as Ashby, Stuart, Forrest, Hampton, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Pat. Cleburne, M. F. Maury, Buchanan, and scores of others who should be household words among our people. The sketches of Lee and Jackson are the only ones which make any pretence to being even
useless dispatches. They are seemingly convinced that he is playing smart generally. General Hood is probably aware of his movements, and will keep him from doing much harm. From Missouri. Northern accounts state that, on the 4th, Price was threatening Rolla. Large detachments of Confederate troops are committing depredations in the portion of the State north of the Missouri river. The devotion of the people of Northern Missouri to the Confederate cause is truly astonishin Johnson's six months men. Anderson says he intends to kill every man he finds wearing the uniform of the Yankees, they having killed his father, mother and sister. Northern dates of the 7th state that on Tuesday last (4th) the rebel General Stirling Price, with a force of about twenty thousand, was six miles west of Union, marching westward towards Jefferson City, designing to take the place, install a secession governor, and hold the State for Jeff. Davis. Union is the county seat of
. Louis, dated October 1, says: I arrived in this city on Thursday night from St. Clair, and no train has come in from there since. The men stopped work on Thursday morning, and I fear by this time many of them are in the rebel service, as Price conscripts every man able to bear arms, and shoots every one that tries to escape. It was not believed that the rebels would go to St. Clair, although many men came in, stating the rebels were at Richwood, and would be there in less than twenty-itizens are coming in here from the country south every hour, leaving then families and all to the fender mercies of the foe. Mineral Point, Potosi, Webster and Richwood have been taken, sacked and partially burned. It is believed that Price has at least twenty thousand well-armed men, and that he will take the capital of the State before we can arrest him; but we are sure to capture the most of his army. The account of the operations before Richmond are very meagre. They say t