Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edward Price or search for Edward Price in all documents.

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icularly meritorious. Joseph Brown (Quartermaster) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them, to replace men disabled at the guns. Edward Price, (Captain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge's breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the spongehead out. Alexander Mack, cularly meritorious. Joseph Brown, (Quartermaster,) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them to replace men disabled at the guns. Edward Price, (Coxswain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the sponge-head out. Alexander Mack,
army. On Sunday, the tenth, a bright and beautiful day, the army moved on to Prairie E'Ann, where, it was understood, Price had determined to make a final and desperate stand. At a point on the prairie two branches make off from the direct roadormation that rendered it certain that Kirby Smith, in person, with reinforcements of eight thousand infantry, had joined Price and were advancing. Taking all these things into consideration, the scarcity of forage, the difficulty of keeping open arcept Fagan. About noon of that day it commenced raining, and continued to rain hard during that and the succeeding day. Price came up at this point, and the battle alluded to in yesterday's paper was fought on Saturday, the thirtieth. It was a sprching, General Steele decided to send General Carr to Little Rock to watch Fagan, as he felt confident of again whipping Price and Smith, should they conclude to attack again. As the rebels did not come to time, the army took up its line of marc
aptain Breese, commanding Sixth Missouri cavalry, severely wounded in the arm, being among the casualties on our side. The enemy were now met in strong force, under command of General Kirby Smith. That Generals Dick Taylor, Mouton, Green, and Price were also there, was afterward ascertained from prisoners, who also stated that they had under them from eighteen thousand to twenty thousand men, while our force, comparatively, were a mere handful The rebels occupied a strong position in the vind glorious victories will be won over the trans-Mississippi rebels. The enemy appears to have moved his whole forces near here to crush out the Union army. According to the reports of prisoners, Kirby Smith, Dick Taylor, Green, Magruder, and Price are all in the field against General Banks and his commanders. The rebel loss in the battles of Sabine Cross-Roads and Pleasant Hill was three to our one. The lack of water between Pleasant Hill and Mansfield rendered it prudent to fall back