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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George F. Price or search for George F. Price in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
advance, under Captain Porter, of Burbridge's regiment; skirmishing with him the entire day. General Price now arrived with Dockery and Crawford's brigades and Woods's battalion, and took command. Corning, I wrote to General Fagan for more assistance, and requested him to send my letter to General Price for his approval. The plan was for Greene, Cabell and Crawford to intersect the road ten mi the Tallahatchie river, near Abbeyville, might have been seen General Pemberton and General Pap Price. General Price told the Commander-in-Chief that a Federal force was marching south by way of HeGeneral Price told the Commander-in-Chief that a Federal force was marching south by way of Hernando, and offered, with a confidence, that his outspoken, brave, cheerful tones showed he believed in, to capture or defeat them if a sufficient force was given him to do so. General Pemberton rf supplies being destroyed by the writer of this burning a mile of railroad trestle-work. General Price respectfully suggested a certain movement, asking only his Missourians to carry it out. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, skirmished heavily with him, and again on the 6th. On the 7th the enemy continued to advance slowly, my advance, under Captain Porter, of Burbridge's regiment; skirmishing with him the entire day. General Price now arrived with Dockery and Crawford's brigades and Woods's battalion, and took command. Cabell's brigade was taken from me and placed in Fagan's division. On the 8th the enemy again advanced, driving Captain Porter with my outpost to the eces of artillery. With the reinforcement of Cabell and Crawford my force was but 1,500, and as I was certain the train could not return until next morning, I wrote to General Fagan for more assistance, and requested him to send my letter to General Price for his approval. The plan was for Greene, Cabell and Crawford to intersect the road ten miles from Camden, for the other troops to enter the road at Poison Springs, fifteen miles from Camden, at 8 o'clock next morning. This plan was agreed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the night of the retreat from the splendidly fortified position of the Tallahatchie river, near Abbeyville, might have been seen General Pemberton and General Pap Price. General Price told the Commander-in-Chief that a Federal force was marching south by way of Hernando, and offered, with a confidence, that his outspoken, brave, General Price told the Commander-in-Chief that a Federal force was marching south by way of Hernando, and offered, with a confidence, that his outspoken, brave, cheerful tones showed he believed in, to capture or defeat them if a sufficient force was given him to do so. General Pemberton refused to detach the troops asked for, though he knew that General Grant could not make any serious demonstration on his front, owing to Grant's communication with his base of supplies being destroyed by the writer of this burning a mile of railroad trestle-work. General Price respectfully suggested a certain movement, asking only his Missourians to carry it out. The General again refused to strike a blow, preferring the easier generalship of retreating; stating as his reason, however, that he did not know where the enemy was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
h.—The regiment lay in line of battle in the woods. Slept all the morning, and read Lady Glenlyon in the evening. Sharp skirmishing on our right all day. May 9th.—Halt by the roadside and seat myself on a log to write. The evening is lovely. The booming of cannon and the rattle of musketry has just ceased, and all nature sleeps in calm repose. Heavy skirmishing again all day on the right, and it is reported that we have repulsed the enemy. May 10th.—Heavy firing again to-day. Generals Price and Van Dorn fought the left wing of Halleck's army, and drove them back. Our loss light. Sunday, May 11th.—The clash of arms has ceased, and the quiet of this holy Sabbath day has been undisturbed. The regiment returned to camp to-day. May 12th.—The election for field officers was held to-day. Major Fitzgerald was elected Colonel; Captain Mageveney Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain Dawson Major. The conscript act has caused some dissatisfaction among the troops, and a few hav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of Colonel George William Logan, on the engagement between the Federal gunboats and Fort Beauregard, on the 10th and Sixth May, 1863. (search)
nd the troops, with spirit and enthusiasm, awaited the attack of the enemy. All the government stores were moved to the large commissary in the fort, and the few remaining citizens notified to leave the town. Officers and men laid on their arms all Saturday night, a vigilant guard being kept. At daylight, Sunday, 10th instant, the smoke from the gunboats was in sight, but the boats themselves did not appear before 1 o'clock that day. They were the iron-clad Pittsburg, the Arizona, General Price, and ram Switzerland. They rounded the bend two miles distant, and proceeded up the reach in line of battle to a point a mile and a half from the fort. Not wishing to throw away a single shot, I took position in the lower casemate and issued orders that fire should not be opened until the lower gun was fired as a signal. Just when we expected the boats to open fire, a yawl bearing a flag of truce was observed approaching the fort. Anticipating that its object was to demand the surr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
st warmly as the work of an able, pains-taking soldier, who has honestly endeavored to ascertain, and frankly to tell the truth about our late war. We propose hereafter to make copious extracts from Colonel Dodge and to publish a fuller review of his interesting and valuable contribution to a history of the war. Osgood & Co, have done their part of the work admirably, and have produced a fine specimen of the book-makers' art. across the continent with the Fifth cavalry. By Captain George F. Price. New York: D. Van Nostrand. A narrative of this famous old regiment (formerly the Second Cavalry) could not fail to be of interest, and we commend the beautifully gotten up volume as worthy of a place on the shelves of our War Libraries. But we must express now our regret that the author could not drop the partisan and write more in the spirit of the true soldier, and our purpose to show up hereafter some of his more glaring perversions of the truth of history. Brook Farm to