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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry W. Price or search for Henry W. Price in all documents.

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esumed, would be sent. It was with the confident conviction of being promptly supported that, when asked to surrender by Price on Sunday, the 15th, he answered with a ringing defiance, and instantly prepared for a desperate combat. He thought thatto raise the siege. But the heroic officer calculated too largely on the cooperation of the authorities at St. Louis. Price arrived at Warrensburg, thirty-five miles from Lexington, two weeks ago yesterday. Everybody knew that he was marching on Lexington, and that he would make a desperate attempt to take it. But we cannot think that Price himself ever imagined he would be allowed leisurely to march to Lexington, surround the garrison, and beleaguer it for a whole week, without being e steamboats in the State, for the speedy transportation of men and material to any point of danger. But so it is, and Price and Jackson and Parsons, in their exultations over their unlooked — for victory, must feel even more surprise than we do,
and fifty wounded. We regret to know that four of our men were killed and eight wounded. The killed are as follows: George Robinson, Company A; home Amelia, Clermont County, Ohio, Joseph Harvey, Company H; Cincinnati, O., Jeremiah Hullinger, Allen County, O., and Jefferson Black, Cir-cleville, Auglaize County, Ohio; both of Company I. Seriously wounded: John Essex, Isaac Z. Bryant, Henry A. Massey. Slightly: Second Lieut. R. B. Underwood, B. A. Harper, J. G. Young, Jacob Genagi, Henry W. Price, and G. R. Wait. We hope every report from the Thirty-fourth Ohio, Piatt Zouaves, may be better, until rebellion shall be crushed and peace and harmony restored. Cole. The fight of the Piatt Zouaves. The following letter is exclusively devoted to the fight which the Piatt Zouaves had with the rebels near Chapmansville, Va. camp Enyart, Kanawha, Oct. 2. Eds. Com.: The Zouave Thirty-fourth regiment, Ohio, have had a chance to show their metal. This was on Wednesday, on
illiant victories which have crowned the army of Missouri, since its organization, the enthusiastic enlistment of the volunteer force for the defence of the State; the unparalleled magnanimity which has been shown by their Commander-in-Chief, General Price, to those taken in arms against the State of Missouri; the faithful manner in which the proclamation of Gen. Price, made after the battle of Wilson's Creek, has been carried out; all call upon the people of Missouri to remain and share the glGen. Price, made after the battle of Wilson's Creek, has been carried out; all call upon the people of Missouri to remain and share the glory which must speedily crown the triumph of liberty over fraud, rapine, and oppression. We are apt to blend private interest and domestic enjoyments too much with the public good — too ready to sacrifice the latter to the former. Where are all the illustrious sacrifices that history records in all past revolutions? Shall this one, waged upon a principle as sacred as any, pass without them! Shall it be a war merely for wealth, and not for principle? The first duty we owe to our family is